Does Schizoaffective Disorder sound serious and am I alienating people when I mention I have it?

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nightmare57

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#1
Does Schizoaffective Disorder sound serious and am I alienating people when I mention I have it?

I know people have heard of Schizophrenia and the stigma that diagnosis attaches. Do you think Schizoaffective Disorder has a stronger stigma because it sounds more aliening to people than Schizophrenia does because hardy anybody hears about it in everyday conversations. Do you think being open about having Schizoaffective Disorder people aren't going to understand the condition really well and think the worst about that person? Does it sound more serious when in reality it is less serious than Schizophrenia. I know for me I become very anxious revealing I have SZA to people, instead I tell them I have Bipolar because I feel its less stigmatising and don't have too explain to them what SZA really means...
 
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#2
I think less people have heard of schizoaffective, it's one of my husband's possible diagnoses along with schizophrenia and substance related psychosis. A lot of people have asked me what it is. But because they sound similar I think that they share a similar stigma. I think though that people have more preconceived ideas about schizophrenia from the media and assume they know what it is and are more willing to ask and find out what it really means with schizoaffective.
 
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nightmare57

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#3
I think I am projecting my own thoughts and feelings on it because I did something seriously stupid and harmed myself back in 2016 and I think my support staff hold it against me and didn't want me to come back here, some of them turned my housemates against me because they got told them I might hurt them next time (when I have no history of violence towards other people) I feel sensitive about my perceived risk and that people think I'm a psychopath.
 
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nightmare57

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#4
I live in supported living and I'm concerned because I think people have it against me here, the staff especially! I think my supported living manager is security making my life hell. She is giving me secret messages to make me paranoid and undermine me. I only want people to like me and be a good friends to them but no matter how much I put the negativity behind me I think the staff here are dissing me behind my back and speaking negatively about me turning everybody against me.
 
Cazcat

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That sounds really horrible, feeling that way about where you live. I think there are still a lot of people who don't really understand mental illnesses and are frightened by it particularly schizophrenia and schizoaffective. Something that I have realised with my husband is that his behaviour always makes sense given his beliefs at the time.

Something that we have realised is that when my husband starts feeling suspicious about the people around him it is often a sign that he is starting to get a little unwell. I don't know if this is something that happens for you too?
 
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ramboghettouk

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#6
i've got a friend with a schitzoafffective diagnosis whose working or was to recently, i think it's a more acceptable diagnosis in the workplace than schitzoprenia

i had that schitzoaffective diagnosis at one point, coincided with me been seriously harrassed with social services leaving me on the grounds we are in possession of a letter from a psychiatrist saying he isn't a priority on mental health grounds, they left me to become a priority
 
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Paleofirst

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Schizoaffective disorder is less serious than Schizophrenia in general yet it has a more alien sounding name. Remember people do not have a RIGHT To know your mental healthcare status unless your a in a very few situations like officer of the court or airline pilot. Other than that people can be in the dark if your uncomfortable with them knowing about your mental healthcare status.
 
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Twokiwisandabanana

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#8
It's up to you whether or not you disclose to people that you are schizo affective
But I make a point of telling people because I want for people to see a person who has it who is not in the news for killing someone.
That the only reference point a lot of people have or they think it's split personality.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#9
certain diagnoseses don't impress the women, at that i'm in a queue at the bus stop and this women is smiling at me, i show my disability pass to the driver and see the smile disapear

and according to freud it all comes down to sex
 
burt tomato

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#10
Does Schizoaffective Disorder sound serious and am I alienating people when I mention I have it?

a bit para pal
 
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nightmare57

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#11
I mostly people I have Bipolar, it goes down better.
 
daffy

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#12
I have schitzoaffective disorder but only the closest of people know it. I haven't had an episode in eight years although I still have anxiety and depression. I don't see why you should tell anyone unless you are in a long term relationship. You wouldn't tell someone you had liver disease unless they needed to know. If I'm having an anxiety attack I will say I suffer social anxiety . If I'm depressed I would rarely go out anyway so that wouldn't happen . I do agree tho that schitzoaffective does have more of a stigma to it. Bipolar seems to have been the tag that a lot of famous people use as an excuse for bad behaviour. Which is an insult to genuine sufferers.
 
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#13
I have schitzoaffective disorder but only the closest of people know it. I haven't had an episode in eight years although I still have anxiety and depression. I don't see why you should tell anyone unless you are in a long term relationship. You wouldn't tell someone you had liver disease unless they needed to know. If I'm having an anxiety attack I will say I suffer social anxiety . If I'm depressed I would rarely go out anyway so that wouldn't happen . I do agree tho that schitzoaffective does have more of a stigma to it. Bipolar seems to have been the tag that a lot of famous people use as an excuse for bad behaviour. Which is an insult to genuine sufferers.
Thank you so much. Your post puts everything we should consider about disclosing our mental health/health issues in a nutshell!!
 
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nicole_alexandra

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#14
still trying to understand

Hey everyone! I am still trying to understand what schizoaffective disorder is. My psychiatrist recently diagnosed me with it. I have severe ongoing anxiety and take something which lowers blood pressure and prozac for depression. I am on 2 mg of of an atypical antipsychotic (was on 6). I had a period of about a year and a half to two years of severe psychosis when in college and wasn't taking anything. I was delusional, alienated, and when people spoke my brain would tell me that they are saying mean things about me in particular. I was also catatonic and would spend hours trying to complete a single task. Since the medication I have been doing very well and have not had too many side effects. I don't feel any symptoms of a schizophrenic nature anymore and the prozac really keeps my depression in check. I am not sure if the propanol is working for my anxiety which is the main problem during this time. Overall the medication really helped me live life. It was difficult to take at first because I didn't think anything was wrong with me but then I finally understood that it was the only way. :)
 
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ramboghettouk

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#15
as far as i know you've never had a freedom pass so how do you know, i was coming back from the dental hospital were i had my wisdom teeth out and this old women saw my pass and asked me what i was doing with it, i knew if i told her to mind her own business i'd be glared at by the other passengers the entire journey for been rude to an
oap

you may yet find out you've seen my posts on benefits
 
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Aurelius

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#16
Hey everyone! I am still trying to understand what schizoaffective disorder is. My psychiatrist recently diagnosed me with it. I have severe ongoing anxiety and take something which lowers blood pressure and prozac for depression. I am on 2 mg of of an atypical antipsychotic (was on 6). I had a period of about a year and a half to two years of severe psychosis when in college and wasn't taking anything. I was delusional, alienated, and when people spoke my brain would tell me that they are saying mean things about me in particular. I was also catatonic and would spend hours trying to complete a single task. Since the medication I have been doing very well and have not had too many side effects. I don't feel any symptoms of a schizophrenic nature anymore and the prozac really keeps my depression in check. I am not sure if the propanol is working for my anxiety which is the main problem during this time. Overall the medication really helped me live life. It was difficult to take at first because I didn't think anything was wrong with me but then I finally understood that it was the only way. :)

Nicole, as the disorder is a complex one where different people may show quite different patterns of symptoms, I have attached a copy of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP) Leaflet on Schizoaffective Disorder.

Please do not be put off by by the fact that it comes from the RCP - it is easy to read and very clearly laid out. The leaflet states right at the beginning:

This leaflet is designed to help understand schizoaffective disorder. It may be useful if:

  • you have a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder
  • you are worried that you may have this condition
  • someone close to you has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder
  • you would like to know more about the disorder.


It covers:

  • what is it like having schizoaffective disorder
  • what causes it
  • who and what can help
  • self-help
  • important information for people who know or look after someone with a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder.


I think it does these things in a more understandable way than many other resources. However, if you are not from the UK you might need to look at how the disorder is viewed and treated in your part of the world.
 

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ramboghettouk

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#17
his exact diagnosis is uncertain but is possibly in the schitzoaffective range, that was the diagnosis when i went through a sucess stage came to london

then when i found myself in the ghetto harrassed i went to social services for help, we are in possession of a letter from a psychiatrist saying he isn't a priority on mental health grounds, same letter i think, remember the gp sending it them when i asked for help
 
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nightmare57

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#18
I rather have no support from the LD team then be forced to take injections against my will and have all the pleasure sucked out my life from it.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#19
i ended up begging the gp in tears to section, turned up with a bag packed all ready, when he refused i went to the local police station to try there, they were closed

do you really want no support in modern times that could mean homelessness and even the homeless get support
 
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Deathcrush

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#20
In regards to when you said one is more serious then the other: I also thought that for a while but I’ve come to realize is that no person is the same and just because you have schizoaffective disorder dosent make it less important than someone with schizophrenia! They are very alike as well, I’m schizoaffective right now but my doctor had been considering changing it to schizophrenia because my depression is seemed to be caused by my hallucinations and delusions.
All the best - deathcrush
 

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