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does being bipolar effect your work?

thing fish

thing fish

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
150
Location
ohio
it sure does effect mine.
i miss a lot of work due to the depression and/or the anxiety. i feel like i am going to lose my job because of it.
what about you?
 
I

Issy

New member
Joined
Oct 5, 2009
Messages
1
Yes it has affected my work quite a bit. I graduated with my degree in 2008 but struggled from my very first year. I almost quit about 3 times, deferred 2 sets of exams and spent a lot of time in tears in the year groups advisors room. However, when I got to the end of it I was on such a high when I got a first class honours.

After that I was quite manic for some time (my highs aren't nearly as extreme as my lows). I managed to hold down a temperary contract for 6 months while I lived at my parents working in a molecular genetics lab. However after that I decided to go back to the same uni (Stirling) to do a PhD. This appears to have been a big mistake. I now believe this decision was clouded by my period of mania making me think this would be a good idea, and yes, for 6 months I actually coped quite well. However 2 months ago I started to find a few health problems getting on top of me and started to feel really lonely away from family. In addition to this I started to really dislike the area (weather, culture e.t.c) and get anxiety when trying to socialise to try and pull myself out of the way I was feeling. It got to the point where I couldn't get out of bed to leave the flat in the morning and when I did manage to get in I would get half way through the day before becoming debilitated by a cloud of gloom. It got to the point where I had to tell my supervisor that I just had to go home back to Dorset to get my head straight and that I might not be back depending on whether I can get things sorted out.

Unfortunately I chose a bad time to come home as my parents went on holiday 2 days after I returned and I'm now on my own for a week. This is probably partially a good thing as it gives me time to think about things but also makes getting things to do with my general health hard to work on because I find that when I am experiencing a low mood I find it very hard to motivate myself, even to try and make myself feel better. I'm now left in a bit of a limbo as the PhD in Scotland is the only opportunity I have (and a very good one at that). It kind of makes me feel guilty thinking about the prospect of turning it down (I haven't officially started yet as I was doing 6 months of data collection lab work for my supervisor). Especially as my supervisor invested so much time in backing my application for funding. I just don't think I'd be able to cope for 3 years in that environment. The problem is, with the recession, I might not find anything else, especially anything that will keep me interested and emotionally stable enough to be a viable long-term option.

Sorry about the extensive post and kinda hijacking your thread thing fish! lol just started to feel good to try and put everything down into words. So in response to your question, yes, very much so. I know i'm intelligent enough to do many things quite well. It doesn't seem to take very long for me to get bored or discontent with job I try, especially when I haven't got family around to keep me bouyant when a period of depression hits hard. Saying that, my dad has been kept on by IBM through long periods of his depression so hopefully I'll eventually find something I really like doing with people that are supportive of people with a mental illness.

P.s I haven't officially been diagnosed with bipolar disorder but it is definately the closest pattern of behaviour I can relate myself to. I once tried medication for depression but had several side-effects and didn't like how emotionally numb they made me feel. I'm not registered with a doctor down here so if anyone can give me advise on where my first point of call should be to getting some help that would be greatly appreciated.

Look after yourselves, Issy
 
T

teddybear2067

Active member
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Messages
30
Location
UK
Ugh

I do Ann Summers parties which means an awful lot of customer contact. A few customers were very rude to me, but I couldn't lose it because I was at work so I had a VEEEEERY long cigarette break.
I am currently avoiding my boss.
It's definately affecting my work.
 
Ruby Tuesday

Ruby Tuesday

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2009
Messages
136
I work full time and my bi-polar has effected my job big time. It was particularly bad before I began taking the anti-pysch meds. I have argued with everyone I work with including the boss. I've walked out of work on numerous occasions because I can't cope. Luckily, I am a bit more stable at the moment but I have to watch my stress levels. Lots of stress = manic moments for me. Luckily I have a good manager, who although he dosent know I am bi-polar, is very understanding.

It is very hard balancing work with bipolar but I just try and take each day as it comes and take my meds.









(y)
 
thing fish

thing fish

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
150
Location
ohio
my bosses know that i am bipolar and they are very understanding but i imagine one of these days it's just gonna be too much. i miss a lot of work and go home early often. i can't imagine they're gonna put up with that for very long.
cross my fingers
 
K

Katie84

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 11, 2009
Messages
68
Location
Sheffield
Its effected my working, i have never been able to hold down a job for more than a few months, i either get really down and dont want to go in, or really high and walk out! im on meds now and not worked for 10 months so hopefully next year i will be able to go back to work once things settle down.
 
F

flamehairedlunatic

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2009
Messages
21
Location
East Sussex
It affects my work a lot. I used to work full-time but after being hospitalised for 11 weeks I moved to working part-time. However, I still sometimes can't go into work because of the depressions. My employer is quite sympathetic and occupational health have supported me a lot.

My main problem is that I am a teacher and kids can be incredibly cruel at times, as well as having a brilliant sense of what mood I am in. Therefore I can be in my classroom feeling awful but putting a smiley face on and the kids can tell I feel c**p and so wind me up something terrible.

I would be totally lost without my job though, it's the one thing which gives me stability and responsibility and something to have to get out of bed every morning for.
 
Sugar Coated Owl

Sugar Coated Owl

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2009
Messages
203
Location
Surrey
It affects my work a lot. I used to work full-time but after being hospitalised for 11 weeks I moved to working part-time. However, I still sometimes can't go into work because of the depressions. My employer is quite sympathetic and occupational health have supported me a lot.

My main problem is that I am a teacher and kids can be incredibly cruel at times, as well as having a brilliant sense of what mood I am in. Therefore I can be in my classroom feeling awful but putting a smiley face on and the kids can tell I feel c**p and so wind me up something terrible.

I would be totally lost without my job though, it's the one thing which gives me stability and responsibility and something to have to get out of bed every morning for.
Totally agree. If I didn't have my job I think I'd just give up completely. A job definitely keeps me battling on.
 
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