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Does anyone recall the day their brain officially broke and OCD took over?

Faith198

Faith198

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 30, 2020
Messages
656
Location
Ohio
I think physical abuse has a lot to do with ocd. I was too being beaten by my father out of the blue, I was constantly scared and I now realize that ocd was a coping mechanism, gave me a sense of safety and control
I’m so sorry you dealt with that too :hug: I’m glad we can both relate to each other in a way though. That’s exactly how I felt
 
M

MissPink

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2019
Messages
112
Location
London
Was it a distinct moment or a slow build. I had traits and some small compulsions but they didn't provoke much anxiety and I wasn't even sure what they were at the time. It definitely didn't eat up my time like it did after it hit full-on.
It all happened when I was recovering from stress from a ex relationship. I moved down South and I had a lot of negative thoughts and my mind was going over board and it was focused on a bad thought that I could not stop thinking about and it tormented me for 3 years. Then my mum had a accident and then it started from there, the trigger came in and now it has lessened as I am much calmer, though. What I went through gave me a lot of stress mentally and took a toll on my life, I don't think I will be 100% better but I am 80% there... I manage every day without any pills
 
F

fightthegoodfight

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2019
Messages
92
Location
Florida
I wasn't even aware it was building. All I knew was that my life seemed a lot scarier and there was no explanation. I developed OCD sometime around the age of 8. My grandmother had died very suddenly. She went into the hospital for a stroke, then had a freak accident while in intensive care and died shortly afterwards. She had barely made it into her sixties.

Completely messed me up, as I had adored her. I became extremely depressed, and very, very angry at the world.

Over time, I began having a lot of issues with obsessive and compulsive behaviors, especially some of the more stereotypical things like handwashing. I developed absolutely bizarre obsessions about germs and cancer being on literally everything. In one of my more lighthearted moments, I even obssessed that I was actually Darth Vader.

Yes. Darth Vader. Because that makes sense, you know?

Fortunately my father, who is a psychiatrist, had been seeing these things in me and brought in a close family friend who was a child psychiatrist to talk about it with me. I will never forget him coming to our house and sitting down with me and explaining OCD. He was this towering giant of a man, six foot nine, with a big old salt n pepper santa beard. But he was a big old softie. He explained the OCD so carefully, and gently, and in a way that made total sense to a kid. I felt so much better after, because finally there was some explanation to the hellish nightmare I had been experiencing in my head. Before him I was constantly terrified. I thought I was a freak.

I will be forever grateful to both him and to my dad for spotting it. I consider myself very lucky to have found out so soon as I know it often takes years of trial and error.
 
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