Do services care?

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ramboghettouk

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#1
do services care? i think some who work for them would claim to care but institutionally they're there to save resources, the only time they care is when it'd cost society more if they didn't, say in terms of a 3k a week hospital admission

like hitler they see people as hungry mouths who the money spent on should be limited as much as possible
 
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ramboghettouk

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#3
i stare into the abyss and the abyss stares back
 
Fairy Lucretia

Fairy Lucretia

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#4
I have had 6 cpn's over 20 years the first 2 were awful
the third was okay 4th and 5th brilliant and now the one I am with I really struggle to talk to
I have never felt as though I am being cared for ,bur rather that I am being 'managed'
I have had a few good experiences since being under MH care as a teenagers but dozens of bad ones
all in all I think care is not that good and certainly needs to be improved upon x
 
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ramboghettouk

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#5
personally i'd sack the lot of them, and put the money saved into introducing a mental illness benefit, then the money might reach the people, i guess society considers them useful in dealing with the non drug compliant lot, seems all the resources go to people who themselves say they don't want it
 
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natalie

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#6
Thinking in terms as a ex outpatient with my name dormant, I think th at if one has very acute problems, t hen t hey do do their very best to help and provide with the best possible asssessments and treatments and or tests.

Now in my experience, and if I can speak from a GP point of view, I ha ve been very balanced and stable for many y ears, since 2007, though i have had problems on lower doseages, before 2007, on this b rand of med, and as I say, since having been very balanced and s tablised, I have been very well, so I can't give a prospective, on a services point of view, staffing wise, they have been brilliant, in my memory bank, from 2006 and 2008 as outpaitent, and can't fault t hem.
 
Muddleduck

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#7
Do people care? Some do, some don't, some can't. I think services are just people with their own personalities and past experiences and current problems in life.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#8
i think a no mean well, it's how that is used by the institution and society for their own ends, they talk about a vocation but a lot become disillusioned and leave, it's the bad workers who stay, who have the ability to appear to be good by picking the easy cases etc
 
Muddleduck

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#9
The people who feel no guilt, think they know we should either pull our socks up or be locked up. The hard ones who they call 'emotionally resilient'. Maybe they are the best ones for the job though? I found the staff i came across very hard to understand and cope with, but that did teach me that i had to rely on myself and that nobody, not even a mental health nurse or psychiatrist, were going to help me more than the basics they are obliged to do, coldly.
 
burt tomato

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#10
Caring is a difficult one. you can always care more. But a care worker has to be professional to excel at their job, and this may come across as cold. You have to be patient and trust them. I work in healthcare, and I can assure we do work hard.
 
daffy

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#11
The trouble is it’s so poorly paid that the ones that are good at their jobs end up having to go into management to get a decent salary and come out of the hands on care
 
midnightphoenix

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#12
my experience is they don't give a flying turd.

Less said about the counsellor I had the better. He cared more about his paycheque than helping. He literally sat there working out his paycheque and not listening to me.
 
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dewey

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#13
Sometimes I genuinely think their way of thinking is:
" Oh that girl over there hasn't committed suicide yet, so her case clearly isn't severe enough to be seen, we'll just put on her a waiting list for 2 years time "

There are definitely a lot of good mental health workers on the NHS, some terrible ones sure, but the main problems are due to :
-austerity - lack of funding where it is severely in demand
-lack of proper training for mental health proffessionals / not checking they are doing their job properly
-lack of education of mental health professionals
-lack of understanding of mental health/lack of empathy
 
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dewey

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#14
It's also an extremely stressful job, I think the people who are best at it probably have struggled with MH themselves but then they end up having problems because they actually have empathy and coping mechanisms, but the job is just so triggering it's hard for them to survive
 
midnightphoenix

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#15
their favourite trick is "watch and wait" and even when something happens "watch and wait some more"
 
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ramboghettouk

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#17
they're just out to park people on meds and leave them, services are only there to check people don't come off meds and do the axe job, theres no care

and there aren't services that help even if you do use them
 
BPDevil

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#18
depends, there isn't a yes or no answer

ive found adult mental health services in my area so far a lot more caring and helpful than the under 18 one because they seem to take you a lot more seriously
 
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nightmare57

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#19
I find the learning disability services caring. What I like is its only a small service so staff stick within the LD service and you often find that you meet the same staff in various different jobs. You have LD nurses who've worked in the ATU's doing day centre work or you seen LD nurses who've done day centre work doing community nursing. Its only a small service.

And unlike mental health services where you get discharged quickly without hardly any support from secondary services in LD services they keep you on within the community learning disability team, its quick to get a psychiatry appointments as they have less patients, I've had the same psychiatrist for 5 years now, he knows me very well and is person centred with my treatment plan. When I have been sectioned its the same psychiatrist in the specialist LD unit, she's good too. Its a very holistic services and within the LD services it's easier to get social services funding. I get 21 hours one to one a week. I also have a great community nurse (this is similar to a CPN) He wrote me a great report (which I helped him write) for my ESA assessment.

When I had my depot at the Wednesday clinic which is done by mental health CPN's I missed a week by mistake as my staff didn't remind me, straight away the CPN had a go at me for not taking responsibility for my own actions, she didn't even know me. The LD service have never had a talk about me taking responsibility. I think in mental health they go on a lot about you taking responsibility, everything is about self responsibility. The LD service isn't like that.