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Do crisis teams put you in crisis?

Tawny

Tawny

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Is it called helpers fatigue or something like that? I think if they hear the same thing over and over, they can become irritated and want to scream GET A GRIP.

I think many of them are in the wrong job. I actually think many of them were unwell at one point and so still have that irritability and inability to cope with much.

The ones who are the best at their job are emotionally detatched but still kind in a professional way rather than an emotional way. They don't get as tired or irritated and their lives are easier, organised, more support at home. They are from that different world where they can thrive in their career because they have no baggage, money worries, have good genes for mental and physical health.

That's my thought.

There are some cold bitches though. Those ones who think they know everything and every one because they did a course in your diagnosis so they know how it feels and it isn't all that bad, what's the fuss, do x, y, z and go away. You think you are ill? many people deal with much more than you blah blah.

I think now, if i need something, i will ask for it. I will be robotic,

i cannot sleep i need a sleeping tablet - thanks
i cannot cope anymore, death would be great right now, give me more medication or a sleeping tablet - thanks
 
jajingna

jajingna

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Is it called helpers fatigue or something like that?
Yes, I have heard it called compassion fatigue, something that affects health care workers faced with the task of dealing with people going through trauma. It can affect them deeply, and after enough time may make them appear indifferent or uncaring towards those they are meant to help. Now, we say, well, it is their job to help and care, but also we are not in their shoes.

I believe it is comparable to what soldiers might experience, and to what many people live with in their own family. For example, there was much sorrow in my family with troubled parents casting that shadow over their children, and now those children are somewhat troubled middle aged men. We have trouble accepting that yet more emotional or mental suffering is in the wind, and sometimes we cannot respond to it, or communicate properly about it. A certain burnout is in place.

Perhaps this is all part of the reason mental health issues are difficult to discuss. It can make us uncomfortable as empathy makes us vulnerable, and can wear us down. We are also reluctant to put others at discomfort, or admit things are not going well.

Anyway, I'm sure most of the health care workers start out caring, and have good intentions, but maybe such work needs proper breaks, sort of like a teacher getting the summer off.
 
B

bluntbanana

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Yes, I have heard it called compassion fatigue, something that affects health care workers faced with the task of dealing with people going through trauma. It can affect them deeply, and after enough time may make them appear indifferent or uncaring towards those they are meant to help. Now, we say, well, it is their job to help and care, but also we are not in their shoes.

I believe it is comparable to what soldiers might experience, and to what many people live with in their own family. For example, there was much sorrow in my family with troubled parents casting that shadow over their children, and now those children are somewhat troubled middle aged men. We have trouble accepting that yet more emotional or mental suffering is in the wind, and sometimes we cannot respond to it, or communicate properly about it. A certain burnout is in place.

Perhaps this is all part of the reason mental health issues are difficult to discuss. It can make us uncomfortable as empathy makes us vulnerable, and can wear us down. We are also reluctant to put others at discomfort, or admit things are not going well.

Anyway, I'm sure most of the health care workers start out caring, and have good intentions, but maybe such work needs proper breaks, sort of like a teacher getting the summer off.
Makes alot of sense.

I do believe that most health care workers start with good intentions, perhaps in future their 'apathy' as to call it will have a more accurate term as it is definitely a thing. I've even spoken to volunteers before that have it, but I'm not sure it would be quite the same thing if it were a volunteer, as theres no real benefit for them to remain in the position since payroll is removed from the equation. I believe most healthcare workers start of with good intentions, develop a degree of apathy and then remain in the occupation due to it being their field of study and they've already dedicated a portion of their life towards it.

I've also noticed alot of vacancies in these job roles, they seem to move around alot, not sure why. When explained to me that a why a member of staff was leaving, it was usually that they were moving into another role elsewhere, perhaps into something a little less 'depressing' or intense. But anyway In my few years working with mental health services I've had 4 psychiatrists, 4 assigned CPN's (Nurses) and 2 support workers. That's quite a high staff turnover rate if you ask me.
 
Ladyfair

Ladyfair

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Yes, I have heard it called compassion fatigue, something that affects health care workers faced with the task of dealing with people going through trauma. It can affect them deeply, and after enough time may make them appear indifferent or uncaring towards those they are meant to help. Now, we say, well, it is their job to help and care, but also we are not in their shoes.

I believe it is comparable to what soldiers might experience, and to what many people live with in their own family. For example, there was much sorrow in my family with troubled parents casting that shadow over their children, and now those children are somewhat troubled middle aged men. We have trouble accepting that yet more emotional or mental suffering is in the wind, and sometimes we cannot respond to it, or communicate properly about it. A certain burnout is in place.

Perhaps this is all part of the reason mental health issues are difficult to discuss. It can make us uncomfortable as empathy makes us vulnerable, and can wear us down. We are also reluctant to put others at discomfort, or admit things are not going well.

Anyway, I'm sure most of the health care workers start out caring, and have good intentions, but maybe such work needs proper breaks, sort of like a teacher getting the summer off. Comparable to what soldiers might experience ? I don't think so
They are also NOT in our shoes if they don't like the job or can't handle it they need to find another job. These people who were suppose to help were cruel even one staff member said to me It's just a job to some people. I'm so angry right now that I'm not going to say anymore.
 
Lunar Lady

Lunar Lady

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Just phoned the crisis team and got another worker with piss poor english and interpersonal skills who when I told her I hadn't seen anyone for two weeks except my CPN and shop assistants said well you saw some one for a depot the other day! I called them bloody useless and hung up and no they didn't phone back despite me telling them I was suicidal. I swear as soon as the travel restrictions are over I am off somewhere to become a smackhead at least I might get away from this zoo of a rock permanently.

@Lone_wanderer: I've only just caught up with this thread as I've been taking a break this week.

Really concerned you were feeling suicidal. How are you now?

Please phone The Samaritans if you get that low again. Sometimes, we just need a human voice and a little kindness. You're welcome to PM me, my old friend. :hug:

Don't forget...phone 116 123 day or night. x

 
Lone_wanderer

Lone_wanderer

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@Lunar Lady, crisis passed awesome sauce, back to my chipper disposition, but thanks honey. XXX.
 
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