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DLA - is it worth it?

yakuza

yakuza

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It's been good chatting with you too Dollit.
I hope it goes well for you,good luck :hug:
 
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Dollit

Guest
I'll put it on my blog how I get on so come over and have a look. :)
 
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Starbright

Guest
Hi, I don't want to butt into your conversation, but I have a question.

When I was in hospital I got the advocate to fill in my DLA form for me. She said I have to say what I would be like on my worst day. I always assume 'my worst day' to mean what I would be like without my medication. So my DLA form says things like I'm unable to go out unaided or without someone to keep me safe and things because without medication I'm totally psychotic, away with the fairies, and intent on killing myself.

When I go back to work, they will know that I'm not like that or I wouldn't be able to work.

So my questions to all of you are:

- Am I right to fill in my DLA forms like that?
- Are they likely to take it off me when I tell them I'm working?

Thanks folks.:)
 
yakuza

yakuza

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Hi Starbright

I was working and still recieving the same amount of DLA,it's really about what you can't do in and around the home.

I would also say that when they look at your form,they take into account that you are answering from the worst point of view so I would always put down how badly you are restricted at your worst times.

I think it also helps to use a separate piece of paper to add how your illness affects you on a daily basis as you don't get an awful lot of room on the forms.

Hope that helps a little :)
 
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ramboghettouk

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Interesting discussion, that word insight funny word, it's a 2 edged sword, they tell me i've got it one shrink using the DSM3 rediagnosed me at one point for that reason, don't know if i've got it some things are too painful to think about
 
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Dollit

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I don't think a patient having insight should affect a diagnosis. Insight just means that you are aware of your condition and your state of mind. Insight doesn't have any effect on recovery or how you cope with things it just means you're acutely aware of what's going on.
 
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ramboghettouk

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Under the DSM3 lack of insight is one of the main symptoms of schitsoprenia, therefore insight effects diagnosis

Remember MIND wanting to hear from anyone who was diagnosed schitsoprenic under the DSM3.

It was a well meaning attempt to avoid a schitsoprenia diagnosis for anyone, unfortunately it coincided with the end of the tory yrs when social services were looking for excuses to leave people and the benefits started been targetted at the most needy, a DSM diagnosis would be used as a reason to leave people
 
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Dollit

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DSM III was replaced by DSM IV at least a decade ago and there is nothing in DSM IV about lack of insight being one of the criteria for a diagnosis of schizophrenia.
 
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ramboghettouk

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Never the less insight has been included in diagnosis and psychiatrists probably still consider it

It's like that thing hearing voices ask a psychiatrist to define it
 
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Dollit

Guest
A psychiatrist once told me that a voice came from outside your head and if you heard something inside your head it was a thought.
 
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Starbright

Guest
Hmm. What about the voices inside your head that sound like someone you know and talk to you as if you're telepathic? Or the thoughts that answer your own so that you think you're telepathic? I've had both of these, and also the voices outside my head. Lots of all of them, all at once. It was pretty impossible to figure out what I should do as they were all telling me to do different things. It was a total nightmare. I did, however, know that I shouldn't be hearing them and that if I admitted it, others would tell me I was ill and I thought I was well, only telepathic and beset by demons.

I'd like to know what a psychiatrist makes of that.
 
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Dollit

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I don't know Starbright. Like everyone else on hear I can only speak from the experiences that I have and from what has been said to me. Also not every psychiatrist has the same opinions, their views and attitudes can be shaped by the experiences they have in clinical practice.
 
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ramboghettouk

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Guess by that definition i don't hear voices, i hear some very unpleasent things when i'm in public places but it's quiet when nobodys around

There was a programme "The Buddha Of Suburbia" years ago and in one episode the indian guy is standing in a square in London with his bike, you see figures passing slightly out of focus and words you hear, racist etc, thats my experience though i'm white, i don't know whether it's hearing voices, i never folowed the programme to see if the guy got diagnosed
 
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Dollit

Guest
I think if it helps your understanding of yourself and how to cope with what's going on you call it hearing voices, if it doesn't you don't. I think that a diagnosis is the ball park in which you sit but how you see yourself and how you feel the diagnosis should be handled gives you the right to pick the seat. If that's not too obscure as an analogy.
 
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