Disabled people are to be warehoused. We should be livid

cpuusage

cpuusage

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#1
Disabled people are to be ‘warehoused’. We should be livid | Mark Brown | Opinion | The Guardian

"The inescapable logic of austerity is looking likely, once again, to reduce people with disabilities to objects – and in doing so to reduce their independence, options and enjoyment of life. According to the Health Service Journal, Freedom of Information (FOI) requests from campaign group Disability United found that 37 NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England were introducing rules about ongoing care that could force up to 13,000 people with health conditions into care homes. The CCGs will essentially begin saying to people with disabilities and long-term health needs: if you haven’t got the cash for homecare, then it’s off to a care home for you.

Imagine you have been living in your home for years. It might be where your kids were born. Being at home, having your stuff around you, having the greatest possible measure of independence, obviously means a lot to everyone, whether you’re well, ill or disabled. Then one day someone comes and tells you, “Nope, you’re too expensive here. We’re moving you to a care home unless you cough up the money to pay for what you need.”

This sounds innocuous to many people. Disabled people and care homes go together in the public mind as easily as “peak-time train service” and “cancellation”. The FOI requests found CCGs were setting limits on how much they were prepared to pay for supporting people in their homes compared to an “alternative option”, which is usually a care home. They were willing to pay between 10% and 40% above the care home option, which will often not be enough to keep someone in their own home.

Anita Bellows, a member of campaigning group Disabled People Against the Cuts is emphatic about what this means: “Institutionalisation is the logical conclusion of cutting the funds for maintaining people at home.”

As Fleur Perry of Disability United says: “Somebody who has never met the person in question can sign a bit of paper and change everything about a person’s way of life.”"

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dlzoidberg

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#2
Frightening, but hardly surprising. 'Warehousing' is one thing, it seems we are also to be 'workhoused'.
 
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TheRedStar

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#3
Frightening, but hardly surprising. 'Warehousing' is one thing, it seems we are also to be 'workhoused'.
To my mind, if you follow the ethos that's been pursued by the Tories ever since they came to power in 2010, workhouses - no doubt dressed up with an alternative, positive sounding name via use of doublespeak, as per all of this government's myriad welfare-related cruelties - are an obvious future step given how pretty much everything else they've done and are doing harks back to the Victorian mentality.

Increasingly, inexorably, Britain is turning into a Dickens novel with iPads.

Espousing greater private responsibility for charity and care (thereby creating the right environment for successfully dismantling the Welfare State and NHS)? Check!

Facilitating, and then perpetuating, a return to the 19th century concept of 'deserving' and 'undeserving' poor (which oiled the cogs of 'welfare reform', and allowed the Tories to get away with both the Spanish Inquisition of the WCA, and the 'starvation as incentivisation' brutality of 'sanctions')? Check!

It isn't just in the context of welfare that it's happening. Brexit - and the (highly uncomfortable) nationalistic triumphalism that's ensued as a result of it - has recreated the isolationist, superior, empire mentality of the Victorian era (except we no longer have an empire to back it up with *facepalm*).

People - not just the very poor, either - are increasingly being crammed into housing that's too small for the amount of folk living in it, while slum landlords get rich from this misery.

The least well off in society are disenfranchised, thanks to the effective gentrification of the party which was originally created to represent the poor, but which now seems more interested in kowtowing to the interests of the same socio-economic group as its middle class infiltrators (who - incredibly - had the cheek to accuse their intra-party opponents of such Trotskyite machinations when their own two-decade long hijacking of Labour finally came into question).

Employment conditions - and the trade unions created to improve and defend workers' rights - are under perpetual attack, while big business gets more and more power to act like the American 'robber barons' of the late 19th century.

The sad - and frightening - thing is that the wider public seems happy with all of this; the first five years of it went down so well that the Tories got back into power without having to share it anymore, while Labour's attempt to offer something genuinely different seems doomed to fail because more people appear to support the 'Red Tory' side of the party, which - paradoxically - believes that 'proper' opposition involves promising to be slightly less nasty than the government, rather than actually offering a genuine alternative to the current political-economic system. A system that far too many people moan about, but then vote for anyway come election time.
 
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TheRedStar

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#5
This is what fucks me off. Are the vast majority of people that blind to actual reality, that heartless, that brainwashed / conditioned - it seems that they are.
The thing is, if you criticise Tory voters for being stupid and/or cruel you in turn are criticised for 'looking down' on those people, but given what this government are doing, and have been doing for a long time - and it's not as though they put any great effort into hiding it - it's really fucking hard to not see people who vote for the status quo as, if not stupid and/or cruel, then definitely selfish and/or ignorant.

I'm not saying I refuse to believe that a Tory can be a good person - I'm not quite at that stage (yet...) - but I'm inclined to think that the politicians and voters of such persuasion who actually possess some basic human decency must be very misguided, and somewhat out of touch with social reality.

I do find that many people who lean to the political right seem to believe that everyone can - and should - be basically the same; they can be somewhat hypocritical in that many of them promote individual freedom, but only within the confines of their belief system (ironically, this makes them not too dissimilar to the far-left communists they generally despise. Circle of politics and all that, eh?). It's why the likes of us are fucked whenever right-wing parties are in charge - they don't like us for being different, they think it's our duty to stop being difficult and conform like everyone else (thereby displaying their fascist tendencies), and they truly believe we can so - and will be happy (it's always dangerous when people take it upon themselves to define happiness on the behalf of others...) - if only we 'try hard enough'. They simply can't accept us for who we are, and so they'll always try to fuck with us in some way... the only difference is the manner, and vehemence, of the persuasion/bullying/torture.
 
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Kerome

Kerome

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#6
Yeah I think it's an affront too. Here in Holland it's not yet that bad, but housing is a big problem.
 
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nightmare57

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#7
They are already doing that in County Durham. People with severe learning disabilities who previously got 24/7 care hours to support them to live in their own homes in the community are now being moved to residential homes because it's cheaper for the council to pay 2.1 staff instead of 1.1. It's going back to the times when people were forced to live in victorian mental institutions.