dementia research funding

D

dreambuggieII

Guest
#2
ello

Just wanted to say - I tend to veer away from the BBC, however I would like to add - I don't believe that we as a world of historically the most brilliant minds, plus years years of research have not found a means of HALTING - this process.
 
tabbykitten

tabbykitten

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Messages
4,434
Location
cloud cuckoo land (UK)
#3
Hi there.

Tend to veer away from BBC for anything like accuracy but I loathe watching any TV news (too depressing) so tend to grab headlines on the internet and this happened to turn up.

I can't see how the process can be halted either which is why a decent level of support for sufferers and their families is so important. Only truly positive thing at the moment is that people, often by trial and error, are finding complementary therapies that can at least slow the process.

For those of us in our 60s the prospect of an increasingly ageing population is disconcerting. For younger generations, I wonder what sort of situation they will have to face.
 
D

dreambuggieII

Guest
#4
dear Tabby - We differ ....

I lived with a bunch of PHD students in Cambridge - pretty cerebral household and very wholesome.

One chap studied sciences, another worked on the Genome Project as a bioinformatist...(programming the sequence of genes) ---------------

Both indiviudals had breakdowns

One was researching "killer" cell formation (his mad words were often - killer kiler killer)-- and the other left the scientific feild to pursue a career in Politics in Scotland ...

Both were incredibly troubled with the direction of their work

I say in short - Reasearch is fcked. I have not the will to write more, all I can say dear tabby, with a sane head in a mad world

" Something is not right in the state of Denmark"

--------------

It saddens me.
 
calypso

calypso

Well-known member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2011
Messages
40,486
Location
Lancashire
#5
There are some good bits of research going on. A cure for Alzheimers looks as though it might be on the cards. There is a link to diabetes 2 (I have that, so not happy about it), and evidence that meds for diabetes (Metformin) and some anti hypertension meds (Losartan/candesartan) can help too. Luckily, I am both of those!

Dementia is a catch-all phrase for a lot of different types of illness. Alzheimers is the commonest and that is the one people focus in on, but there are small strokes type (multi infarct), and one called Lewey-body which is also one that may be cured.

So its not all doom and gloom.
 
tabbykitten

tabbykitten

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Messages
4,434
Location
cloud cuckoo land (UK)
#6
Good to know there is hopeful news.

So agree with you about dementia being a catch-all phrase. Lots of other conditions may or may not fall under the "umbrella term". I cared for my MIL and my mother for some years and both presented with psychological conditions which were basically dementia. MIL after a series of strokes. Her GP insistent that it was not dementia but GPs are not experts in this field!! My mother had something undefinable that her GP, in the kindest way possible, defined as being "in a world of her own". Said world did not compute with functioning society but she was happy - what more could you ask.
 
calypso

calypso

Well-known member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2011
Messages
40,486
Location
Lancashire
#7
The thing to remember is that if diagnosed accurately, there are meds which can help to keep functions alive for a longer time. In multi infarct, better control of bloody pressure meds, blood thinning meds etc can help a lot. Once a function is lost, its lost and all the memory clinics in the world won't get it back.

I would advocate for everyone, get an expert on the case asap. Don't leave it to GPs. To give you an idea, there is a mini dementia test still being used and its absolutely awful:

* What day is it? ( If you do shifts, or been asleep/nodding off for several days, you won't remember)
* What is the weather like today? (speaks for itself)
* Count down in 7s from 100 ( I still can't do that one and there is a time limit)
* Think of 3 words, say them to me. In 15 minutes I will ask you to repeat them. (I always forget one)
* Here is a picture of a clock, now draw a clock face yourself. (Ok sounds simple, but it doesn't take into account anyone who has arthritis in their hands - ever)
* Who is the Prime Minister? ( if you have switched off watching the news, you may not know)
* What year did the Queen get crowned? ( Can you answer that?)
* Who is president of the USA ( Now, many many people might get that wrong. OK, Barak Obama is distinctive, but many of the others weren't)

All this is often done in a hurry by impatient professionals firing the questions at you. If you get more than one, possibly two, wrong, you have a provisional diagnosis of dementia. When I did it many years ago, I got 4 wrong, as did many of the other nurses. This has not been changed for years and years. Some tests have slightly different questions, but you get the drift.