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Deaths in Mental Health Detention: An investigation framework fit for purpose?

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Deaths in Mental Health Detention: An investigation framework fit for purpose?

Note: About one person per day dies while being incarcerated in so-called mental health hospitals, this has been the ballpark figure for many years ... for example "There were 3,628 deaths in mental health detention (501 self-inflicted) between 2000 and 2010, accounting for 61% of all deaths in state custody. The proportion of deaths recorded from "natural causes" is also exceptionally high".


Ground breaking report launches

On Wednesday 11 February a ground breaking evidence based report was launched in Parliament. The report is based on INQUEST’s work with families of those who have died in mental health settings.

INQUEST provides specialist advice and a complex casework service to people bereaved by a death in custody/state detention.

The report identifies 3 key themes:
- The number of deaths and issues relating to their reporting and monitoring.
- The lack of an independent system of pre-inquest investigation as compared to other deaths in detention.
- The lack of a robust mechanism for ensuring post-death accountability and learning.

The report documents concerns about the lack of a properly independent investigation system, unlike deaths in prison and police custody which are independently investigated. It also informs us about the consistent failure by most Trusts to ensure the meaningful involvement of families in investigations.
Ultimately, it highlights the lack of effective public scrutiny of deaths in mental health detention.

Michael Antoniou, husband of Janey Antoniou (pictured) who died in mental health detention said: 'I could never have gone through the investigation and inquest process on my own without the support of INQUEST. The trust was more concerned about deflecting criticism than establishing the truth. My experience since Janey's death has made it crystal clear that there is an absolute need to have independent investigations.' ...
 
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firemonkee57

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Deaths in detention are obviously a tragedy and measures should be taken to prevent them , but how many people have died because they needed to be hospitalised but due to bed shortages were left in the community with poor support?
 
SomersetScorpio

SomersetScorpio

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Deaths in detention are obviously a tragedy and measures should be taken to prevent them , but how many people have died because they needed to be hospitalised but due to bed shortages were left in the community with poor support?
Absolutely.
I'd really like to know this!
 
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Deaths in detention are obviously a tragedy and measures should be taken to prevent them , but how many people have died because they needed to be hospitalised but due to bed shortages were left in the community with poor support?
It's interesting how your slant is that they "need" to be hospitalised. Maybe they just needed some help, and that help can be much better provided in other places.

The fact that they lock the doors of secure units to keep people in rather than out is a bit of a clue as to how helpful most people find them. The existence of sectioning and forced treatment is, rather than the answer, a part of the problem and is partly responsible for many deaths outside them ... as it leaves people unable to ask for help when they feel they want to end their own life as the prospect of being kidnapped, incarcerated and tortured leaves them too scared to sask for the help they need at that point in their lives.


Still, maybe we could actually have one thread where we agree on the crucial point ... those the state has deprived of their rights and decided to take over responsibility for deserve a full inquiry, the same as prisoners in other prisons get, when they then go on to die under those circumstances.
 
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firemonkee57

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It's interesting how your slant is that they "need" to be hospitalised. Maybe they just needed some help, and that help can be much better provided in other places.

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Of course hospitalisation should be an action of last resort and options should be explored to avoid that if possible. However realistically there will always be some people for whom hospitalisation is the only viable option, and how to treat those people in a humane manner ,while being hospitalised, is of paramount importance .
 
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firemonkee57

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Still, maybe we could actually have one thread where we agree on the crucial point ... those the state has deprived of their rights and decided to take over responsibility for deserve a full inquiry, the same as prisoners in other prisons get, when they then go on to die under those circumstances.
You asking for agreement given your posting record is a bit rich. However of course there should be a comprehensive inquiry that leads to improvements in the treatment of those that need to be hospitalised, and the minimisation of hospitalisation.
 
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Of course hospitalisation should be an action of last resort and options should be explored to avoid that if possible. However realistically there will always be some people for whom hospitalisation is the only viable option, and how to treat those people in a humane manner ,while being hospitalised, is of paramount importance .
Go on firemonkee ... agree with me for once ... if this issue can't unite us nothing will ... bring yourself to do it ... repeat after me ...

PEOPLE INCARCERATED IN PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTIONS, PEOPLE FOR WHOM THE STATE HAS ASSUMED RESPONSIBILITY, DESERVE THE SAME FULL ENQUIRY INTO THE REASON THEY DIED WHILE IN CUSTODY OF THE STATE THAT OTHER PEOPLE WHO ARE IN THE CUSTODY OF THE STATE (LIKE THOSE SENT TO PRISON) GET!

That they don't already have that same right automatically is a fucking outrage.
 
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you asking for agreement given your posting record is a bit rich. However of course there should be a comprehensive inquiry that leads to improvements in the treatment of those that need to be hospitalised, and the minimisation of hospitalisation.
:dance::dance::dance::dance: WOOOOHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! :dance::dance::dance::dance:
 
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firemonkee57

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ME- The only difference between you and I on this issue is over whether hospitalisation is sometimes needed.
I believe we both want better treatment of the distressed/mentally ill .
 
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ramboghettouk

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Go on firemonkee ... agree with me for once ... if this issue can't unite us nothing will ... bring yourself to do it ... repeat after me ...

PEOPLE INCARCERATED IN PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTIONS, PEOPLE FOR WHOM THE STATE HAS ASSUMED RESPONSIBILITY, DESERVE THE SAME FULL ENQUIRY INTO THE REASON THEY DIED WHILE IN CUSTODY OF THE STATE THAT OTHER PEOPLE WHO ARE IN THE CUSTODY OF THE STATE (LIKE THOSE SENT TO PRISON) GET!

That they don't already have that same right automatically is a fucking outrage.
and incidentally so do those who die in the community due to lack of care, those who've died due to benefit cuts for example
 
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