DBT. Works?

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Whereisthehope333

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Joined
Dec 28, 2016
Messages
8
#1
I'm diving head first into DBT after BPD diagnosis. In my iop I can't stand it. It's like daycare. I tell my clinician that I would rather do the exercises on my own. I feel like he agrees that that's a good idea. New to it. Seems like it would be helpful. Especially one on one with my clinician. I like him and he teaches me helpful things. But I've heard that people talk sh*t about DBT. Have I set my hopes too high????
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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Joined
Nov 23, 2015
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17,146
#2
Dbt does apparently work BUT

I was describing my own experiences in a Dbt group to my psych and she rolled her eyes when I was describing it.

it was All Wrong, what they were doing. I suspect they were students or first year grads running it or something.

anyway I left after 3 sessions as I felt it was Utter Tripe but

1. its the only available treatment for BPD currently
2. they say it does help, at some level
3. I would say it does also, at some level

you can get a lot of dbt stuff on YouTube.

I'm mixed about it - I think probably a lot of folk can benefit but I personally am not one of them.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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Nov 23, 2015
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17,146
#4
Yes, I hear that a lot. There's plenty of half-baked DBT stuff around but it's not real DBT and it doesn't work.
I personally don't think a group setting is viable.

What happens: the dominant ones float to the top and hog up all the time. I spent the session listening to some girl go on, and on, and on about her fights with her husband and how she became present by running a hot bath

I'm too sick to have a husband, or a bath.

I was the only one in the group without a life at all so all I got to do was listen to them moan and bitch about the ppl who loved them or the jobs they hated or the cars they couldn't drive without ranting.

I'm sorry I sound kind of bitter.

I think I am. it was horrid.

Add in the facilitators who had a bell they rang everytime someone made a judgement statement, like you couldn't even say, the weather is terrible without them ringing it.

It was ridiculous, traumatizing and hilarious in equal measure. :shrug: But apparently some folk do get something out of it.

on the other hand, after my experience I did some googling and found the Drop Out Rate is 75% which is insanely high. It implies a good % of those who finish the course either are too polite to drop out, or have some sort of narcissistic/hypochondriac disorder.
 
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loopylou27

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
10
#5
I had two years of both group and individual dbt therapy and it was somewhat helpful. At least it helped me quit self-harm and other unhealthy behaviours , but that's it.

I hate mindfulness - I cannot sit with it and it never worked for me. Don't even get me started on radical acceptance. That doesn't work for me either.

It's the only treatment I can get. I finished it over a year ago. I try using the skills and practicing them but I get no where. I don't even feel like i have bpd. I don't agree with the label at all.
 
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Clandestine Rob

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Joined
Sep 21, 2016
Messages
356
#6
It only works if you believe in it

Mindfulness is difficult but works for me although I'm far from a master of it, the trick is you don't have to be though. I'm doing ECS for the second time and then hopefully on to DBT, and radical acceptance truly is the only way out of hell. If you don't believe in it though, it's unlikely to work as your subconscious is allready saying it won't, open up to it and you might well be amazed.

Peace