cPTSD is not a mental illness (??)

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johnram

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#1
I listened to a podcast with the above title recently and i really liked it, it explained, how through researching and understanding our cPTSD (and i think PTSD too), we may come to think we have depression, anxiety, other problems....

We own this stuff, but in essense it isnt us, but has become us....which differs to a lot of other mental health problems

i felt it had a lot of truth for me, as i spent years treating depression, treating addiction, treating lack of assertiveness etc etc and doing courses, and books......but now understanding trauma and cPTSD, has been a load off, and makes me feel at ease somewhat

i think i am rambling, but thought i would share to see if it made sense to others

I havent posted the link, as i forget the rules for posting such items

thanks
 
SunnyDaze

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#2
It's my understanding that PTSD is considered a mental illness and why it's listen in the DSM.CPTSD on the other hand,isn't in the DSM yet but I know some professionals do diagnose it,and is considered a mental illness also.

I am interested in the podcast so I can understand what you're saying.You can send me a link in a PM if you like.
 
SunnyDaze

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#4
It's my understanding that PTSD is considered a mental illness and why it's listen in the DSM.CPTSD on the other hand,isn't in the DSM yet but I know some professionals do diagnose it,and is considered a mental illness also.

I am interested in the podcast so I can understand what you're saying.You can send me a link in a PM if you like.
I can't stand the typo I made,it should have said "and why it's listed in the DSM.Dang autocorrect. :)
 
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Catlady07

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#5
Awesome! I've been attending therapy for the first time recently and coming to realise that my issues may be ptsd rather than the depression I've been failing to try to treat. I'm going to listen to this podcast. Thank you
 
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johnram

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#6
have a listen and i would be keen to hear your take CatLady07, also welcome to the forum
 
daffy

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#7
Will have a listen to that. I do think that cPTSD and PTSD are caused by an emotional trauma and not a physiological one. But as time goes on if untreated does it become a mental health issue or still an emotional one.
 
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johnram

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#8
hi Daffy, i find what you say interesting as i have tried to conjure thoughts on the difference, and simplistically, i think PTSD can come from a host of things but singular and not compounded by another event, but cPTSD is a lot of trauma events interlinked, and has developmental trauma as an initial factor. but thats just my pondering

regarding the second point, i have found and read, that treating the behaviour elements doesnt fix the issue, hence the treatment generally encompasses both the trauma and the repercussion, be that depression, addiction or whatever, but the focus or the key element being the trauma being addressed rising in a change or weakening of the symptoms
 
Hopeful313

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#9
I was diagnosed with PTSD in 2004. The traumas that I’ve experienced didn’t debilitate me. It’s the scars that were left behind. Some scars can disappear with time but there are scars that can be permanent. Yes, it’s an injury but not every injury can heal completely and if treatable, it doesn’t mean no effects or no aftermath.

My complaint or suffer wasn’t that “Oh, I’m traumatized. Help me”. My suffering was anxiety to an extent that it was physiologically disabling. I can tell and convince myself that I am not living that event anymore but how can I convince my brain that it isn’t necessary to be anxious? Or how can I get my brain to produce more serotonin???
I agree with some of what she said but she fails to recognize the scars and the damage of trauma on how the brain operates.
 
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johnram

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#10
I was diagnosed with PTSD in 2004. The traumas that I’ve experienced didn’t debilitate me. It’s the scars that were left behind. Some scars can disappear with time but there are scars that can be permanent. Yes, it’s an injury but not every injury can heal completely and if treatable, it doesn’t mean no effects or no aftermath.

My complaint or suffer wasn’t that “Oh, I’m traumatized. Help me”. My suffering was anxiety to an extent that it was physiologically disabling. I can tell and convince myself that I am not living that event anymore but how can I convince my brain that it isn’t necessary to be anxious? Or how can I get my brain to produce more serotonin???
I agree with some of what she said but she fails to recognize the scars and the damage of trauma on how the brain operates.
i agree with that, as i dont know how to e.g. address my flight or fight

what have you used for treatment, what has helped if you mind me asking?
 
Hopeful313

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#11
i agree with that, as i dont know how to e.g. address my flight or fight

what have you used for treatment, what has helped if you mind me asking?
From 2004 until October of 2018, I was dependent on therapy. 2016-17, my son was abducted and someone I knew killed himself and this is when I couldn’t get my brain to function right and I developed POCD. Now, I am on medication (Escitalopram 30 mg daily and diazepam when needed) and therapy twice a month. Even with treatment, I do on edge sometimes. I was doing amazingly well from January until 2 weeks ago. It’s been a roller coaster.
 
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johnram

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#12
Really sorry to hear that, sounds like very challenging circumstances recently.

I would hope that all the good work you have done before is helping you now in some shape
 
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Confusedandanxious

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#13
Cptsd is a normal reaction to an abnormal experience.

I had this discussion just the other day elsewhere as I realised that my anxiety attacks and stuff are reactions to things. It made me question whether I'd still suffer from the anxiety had I not have had those negative experiences.

I think it hits the mental illness section because it affects our day to day living. As with OCD for example, you can have OCD traits but it's not really a cause for concern until it starts having an impact on your life.
 
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#15
i got into trouble for saying the tiredness due to my drugs is like me, some activist decided i was saying me was a mental illlness

i liked that psychiatrist who said you've had these issues for a long time now they're not going to go away suddenly, liked the word issues but i need benefits and the dwp doesn't deal in issues
 
SunnyDaze

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#16
hi Daffy, i find what you say interesting as i have tried to conjure thoughts on the difference, and simplistically, i think PTSD can come from a host of things but singular and not compounded by another event, but cPTSD is a lot of trauma events interlinked, and has developmental trauma as an initial factor. but thats just my pondering
PTSD can be diagnosed even if it's not just a singular event.I went through extreme,prolonged abuse in childhood and was diagnosed with PTSD.I think mainly because cPTSD is not yet in the DSM for professioanls to be able to use it as an "official" diagnosis.

But I think you are right about cPTSD being a lot of trauma events.but it doesnt nercessarily have to be in childhood.It just means repeated trauma.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#17
when people deny they've got a mental illness to me that just shows the stigma attached to mental illness
 
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johnram

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#18
when people deny they've got a mental illness to me that just shows the stigma attached to mental illness
I agree that has a factor, but i think there is a distinction that isnt made clearly between something that is part of you from inception and something that was created due to circumstance.

On the first part - It has taken me a long time to even admit to non close people that i have had depression, addiction was easier to admit. So i agree

On the second - I never had any depressive periods until an event for another family member happened, and given that was an attempted suicide, my reaction was a result of both that event and the lack of emotional intelligence due to a fragmented upbringing and lack of secure attachment

hope that makes sense
 
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ramboghettouk

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#19
that distinction applys to mental illness as well, your showing your prejudices