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Council Tax Discount.

Rorschach

Rorschach

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While I was replying to a thread a moment ago, I brought up the detail of council tax reduction for persons suffering from 'serious mental impairment' who are employed (i.e. not getting council tax benefit). People with conditions of a neurochemical or neurodegenerative causation can be considered as suffering from mental impairment. The only argument in this case can be as to what degree; fortunately the comparison is with yourself, not with a mythical 'norm'. Thus if you are functioning below you potential as a result of any neurobiological factor, you are by definition, mentally impaired.

Stress, for instance, causes synapses to shrink, which causes decreased functionality to the brain (i.e. impairment). Thus if you were diagnosed with depression caused by stress, you would be entitled or could at least argue the case for your eligibility to the discount.

If this is true for a symptom as common as stress related illness, then it obviously applies to more chronic and debilitating conditions as covered within these forums.
 
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ramboghettouk

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Think they fobbed tou off with a 25% discount on council tax, thats if your living alone, you can get fulll council tax enullment if you have a GPs letter saying your intellectual or social problems are extreme, when i applyed when i was working the gp refused, that was a long time ago, now as i'm on benefits it's not an issue

I got a degree as well whilst diagnosed schitso, there was a flurry of rediagnosing, then in the tory yrs i found myself on a salvation army estate experiencing harrassment, when i applied for rehousing social services said they had a letter from a psychiatrist saying i wasn't a priority on mental health grounds, a housing commitee said that been schitso in itself did not mean you were entitled to housing, they left me to my health deteriated before rehousing me, at one point i begged the gp and shrink in tears to let me go into hoapital, you don't get in by asking

I don't know maybe things have changed, remember reading somewhere that what happens to labour's back to work schemes and the people if theres a change of goverment or a recession

They warned me on uksurvivors that mentalhealthforum is part of the goverment back to work scheme, i thought they wsere more paranoid than me
 
Rorschach

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It’s not the single person’s discount (as there are 5 of us in this apartment). Oh I don't know I'd say it’s probably not paranoia, tho' from what I can gather there's no political (as in governmental) agenda here to force/coerce people back to work. That said people who have and want to return to work for the myriad of reasons there are, shouldn't have to feel they can't talk about their experience to placate the people who desire staying on benefits. Unfortunately I foresee their paranoia getting worse rather than better, as more people with illness are going to strive for normalisation of their lifestyle, and while we could have a discourse about dialectic materialism and the inherent evil of the bourgeois capitalist class and system, working for material gain (your own and others) has been a feature of human culture since we became sedentary and produced a surplus...

I'd imagine if anything annoys people who say they can't 'get on their bike' because of x, y, and z, it's people who are managing to ride despite the same obstacles. Easiest way to dismiss those other people's experience and efforts is to dismiss them as part of a government conspiracy I suppose :rolleyes:


I found the link for the discount a way down the page if anyone is interested...

 
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ramboghettouk

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I looked at the link to the goverment website about council tax, in fact i'm right, we're both in effect right, we're just in different circumstances.

If theres a disabled person living alone in a property and they have a gps note to socially reduced abilities they don't have to pay council tax, if the person is sharing their contribution to the total council tax is waived, also a disabled person living in a property drops the property down one band, so if your sharing, it's only a share of the council tax that is stopped

Since you brought up sharing thats a whole different ball game to me living alone, and using the word ghetto, it may be me, but it's a struggle living alone before job comes in

What Job are you doing, theres jobs then theres jobs

I think generalising is dangerous, some work may be an idea others not as mind said when the new benefit proposols were introduced paranoid schitsoprenia can vary and vary between people, thats recently been my diagnosis before it was hebephrenic scitsoprenia, whats your diagnosis, past present etc
 
Rorschach

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My diagnosis has varied depending on which Shrink you ask. The usual one is Schizophrenia, but the more insightful shrinks has designated me as having Schizoaffective Disorder, which is a two for one deal combining Schizophrenia and Affective Disorder (Bi-Polar, Manic Depression).

When I returned to work, it was via New Deal, where I worked as an admin assistant for the local borough to gain experience while receiving JSA (and some allowances for clothes, travel etc.), that lead to working at the BBC on a disabled scheme (it’s called Extend if you look at the BBC website) again in an admin role. From there I had real problems getting further work, ending up on JSA again. I then temped for a while, and ended up getting my current position as a part time facilities assistant three years ago. Originally I worked for 20 hours a week, but then my hours were upped to 25, as well as a 10% wage increase last year :) . This year as well as doing my regular job (i.e. the 25 hours in the afternoon/evening) I am also taking up a voluntary research assistant position with a Medical School about 5 minutes from my job. That will mean I will be gaining experience in the field of mental health research on this project (which is funded for two years) alongside the MSc (part time over 2 years) I am due to begin in September (I graduate 2:1 in my BSc in July). At the end I should be Rorschach BSc, MSc, with two years (via the voluntary work) real experience of research in a health environment. Then I will have, I hope, made up for lost time, and wheareas I can acquire academic skills and experience, not many academics gain near 20 years experience of being an insider in the mental health system. Sure you don’t get certificates for it, but the knowledge it grants can be turned to being invaluable....
 
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ramboghettouk

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"his exact diagnosis is uncertain but is possibly in the schitzoaffective range" thats how it was running when i was harrassed in that salvation army area and social services said they had a letter from a psychiatrist saying i wasn't a priority on mental health grounds, i think it was the above letter the gp sent it them when i applied for a bus pass

Can you ubderstand why i feel the way i do, i understand your views, the diagnosis solidified into paranoid schitsoprenia, i'd seen the mp with the people from the disability centre, they were saying that if people were forced into work orientated activities, disabled people get picked on on the bus, so i told the psychiatrist i get picked on on the bus.

These people with physical disabilities have taken on the cripple role, beleive the disability movement tells people in wheelchairs to accept it
 
Rorschach

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I don't think people with physical disabilities take on the concept of cripple, I'd say exactly the opposite. There's no point arguing that you are able bodied if you are in a wheel chair, however, the argument is that it is not the predominate feature of their lives. I'd imagine that the disabled, while acknowledging disability issues, want to be judged as sentient individuals with opinions, ideas, beliefs that fall beyond the parameters of their physical condition. Being a 'cripple' is being confined by your condition, where both you and wider society see it as a defining feature of your existence rather than a reality to be accepted and integrated allowing you to move on beyond its boundaries. Surely that is exactly what stigma does; it puts you in a box, seals the box, and puts an easy label on the box. The 'sick role' is an interesting concept developed by a sociologist called Talcott Parsons, I'll see if I can find a link. It posits that sickness, and thus being sick, is an economic construct as much as a biomedical reality...
 
Rorschach

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Found a link that outlines the theory

Sick Role
 
Rorschach

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Actually Schizoaffective disorder isn't a half way house. That idea comes from half educated shrinks who still hold to the idea that you are either Schizophrenic or Affective. The old theory is that you are one or t'other. Actually Schizoaffective isn't some kind of limbo until the shrink can decide on a diagnosis, it is a diagnosis; it means you have both illnesses.
 
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ramboghettouk

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I know labelling theory, i went through a period when i took it very seriously indeed, i said to one friend, isn't the final step when you take on the label yourself, she got really angry

She pointed out that medication may control the worse excesses but isn't cure

I don't know about you but i'm finding this argument stressfull, your not me, i'm not you, horses for courses
 
Rorschach

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I'd tend to see it as a first step, not a last. Not sure why she got angry. You see it's who takes ownership of the label, and what their agenda is. Accepting a label doesn't necessarily mean you've become subjugated, it can be a vital role in moving on and redefining yourself. For instance I've been called 'crazy' for years, but given the calibre of the people saying it, I've always taken it as a veiled compliment. After all if they are the measure of normality, they're right, I don't figure on their scale; crazy will do very nicely.

Not sure why this conversation is stressing you out but I can guess. If you manage to reconcile the internal debate you may have (or may refuse to have), then when it appears objectively in external reality it will cease to be a problem. A feature of my periods of sickness was when the boundaries between internal and external realities seemed to blur, always made me feel wobbly...
 
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ramboghettouk

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I'm 50 this year, did apply for a job with the bbc in the past, distant past before the bbc claimed any disability friendly claim, same with a lot of jobs.

Whatever the situation now, i'm too old and in past days i've been through so much as a result of the disability/label, bit of an old queen if yoy'll forgive the gay analogy.

I don't have family support, ironiocally it was this psychiatrist calling my parents in and saying i could lead an independent life, i've got to thank, it allowed them to cut the ties.

The time to talk about work recovery was years ago, when they did it was the thatcher years, no one got work

Comments about Scargill, well he was proved right about the plans for the mines, the way his name is now an insult, thats the media in it's true colours
 
Rorschach

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There was another thread where we were discussing work, and one of the members was saying he found work a bit daunting, especially the age thing when filling in CVs. To be honest I don't think work is crucial to recovery, but I definitely think pushing the boundaries of the label is. It’s great you have your own space, just so long as it doesn't become akin to a cell. I have no idea what your interests are outside of mental health issues, but if you are not able or it's not realistic for you to take up employment, then there are many other activities that will bring fulfilment and are also social pursuits. I'm assuming of course that you don't do such things (only because you haven't mentioned them), but there could be looking into a subject that you have had a long standing interest in, or an art or craft. For me the crucial factor is to break out of the confines that come with being mentally ill or living with a condition. I think by default it includes leaving a comfort zone and mixing with people beyond mental health institutions, be they formal, informal, governmental or charity. The whole experience of living through a mental illness includes large chips appearing on the surface of an ego, for me getting out into the world and reclaiming a sense of wholeness, a sense of what YOU consider normal is crucial in feeling improved mental health. At the end of the day you owe it to yourself (as I've said and I'm sorry if you think it’s messianic, like I said call me Brian) to have the best possible life you can have, not some pale imitation.
 
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ramboghettouk

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I was due to restart a digital photography course but i've had to call the police to my neighbour, don't see me capable of it tommorrow, the first sessions are important as the group is forming

Maybe i'll move to other social housing exavtly the same, a high proportion of MI neighbours who if i moan about i'll be told i'm one myself
 
Rorschach

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No mate you can't let things pull you down!!! If you've made an intention to go, then drag yourself out. It sounds as if your housing thing is a bit crazy (hell has no fury...), so anything that gets you out and about will do you good.
 
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