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Chooses on anti-psychotic - struggling

raven

raven

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Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
761
Location
Bristol
Well I've just got home from my appointment with the psychiatrist. I'm not really sure how it went. He, it seems, is quite willing to put me on any anti-psychotic that I care to suggest. A flexibility that I find unnerving. I showed him the spreadsheet I'd found which compares the different anti-psychotics and he asked to keep it! http://meds.queensu.ca/~clpsych/orientation/Antipsychotics%20Comparison%20Chart.pdf

He wanted me to make a decision but I really felt so self concious and unable to make a decision so he suggested that I reduce the risperidone and see if that gets rid of the restless legs. He saw I was worried about doing that and I eventually admitted that I was worried the anxiety would increase which I'm having trouble with anyway. He suggested then, if it did that I increase the risperidone back up until I see him again in 5 weeks time. We continue to talk about different medication options. I suggested the cholopromine and he told me about how it was discovered by accident by people drinking fuel!? It is a old drug and so has very many side effects. In the end he suggested that in 5 weeks time if the anxiety hasn't improved that I try seroquel. That's the one that Julia is on and it doesn't seem to help with her restlessness. But I am willing to try it. He suggested that I do some research on NICE for the drugs.

I then plunked up some courage and asking him what my diagnosis is. He glanced though my notes and said most likely anxiety mixed with inability to handle emotions. There is no label in there. He said that I could see my notes at any time. I said "yes please" and so for next session he is going to arrange for me to have a copy of them. Wow, I'll find out stuff that people have written about me. He also said I'm not depressed. Maybe thats true, I don't know.

Feel absolutely awful at the moment. Wind down from the meeting with him probably. If I had something that would knock me out I'd take it.

Feel like butterflys in my stomach. What on earth have I got to be anxious about?

Temptation to OD is high, as usual. Mostly as a distraction rather than to kill myself.

Anyone know an anti-pschotic that is good at reducing anxiety?


raven
 
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NrLondonGuy

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As my own doctor said - you can read about each one and the 'general effects' it does but at the end of the day each individual is differetn and teh Dr and you will only know the effect it will have until after you have tried it as our barins are all different. What may be one persons miracle cure no sideffects may be another person nightmare althogh most of us fit somehwere imbetween.
 
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NrLondonGuy

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best to discuss this in more detail with your dr and any sideffects that may concern you.
 
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staples

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they a drug for side effects restless legs, canna mide whit its calleed right enough. i stopped resperidone for serequel twice first time i fell asleep at work second time i ended up in hosp fur months (although in fairness to serequel i had alot more besides going on)
 
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rasselas

Guest
Anyone know an anti-pschotic that is good at reducing anxiety?
Sadly, no. This is off-label use. Not that the on-label use is without controversy. But that's another story. Neuroleptics dampen overall brain function. Like turning the volume dial down on major brain regions, particularly reducing emotions and the sense of now. Long-term, though, you are running a very high risk of adding a lot more to the cart than you started out with.

Have you tried psychotherapy?
 
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skyblue

Guest
Long-term, though, you are running a very high risk of adding a lot more to the cart than you started out with.
Mark - If you don't mind, could you explain to me your understanding in what anti-p's like Quetiapine/Seroquel do to harm you ?

It's just that Quetiapine really helped me with my anxiety and depression. I also had no side effects at all, I felt more confident and content in myself. But, I have constantly worried over some horror stories of possible brian damage caused by these drugs to which I have now decided to discontinue with them completely.
The thing is; the real me has come back - overly sensitive so it seems and I cry about most things. I know this is me, but I don't like this part of me, it disrupts my life and sends me into depression.

The thing is, if I were to carry on taking Quetiapine, I know I would need it for life because how it helps my overly sensitive emotions.

I have to weigh things up and get some honest views from people other than the doctors, I find it hard to sometimes trust their views.

Thanks for your time and Raven, I hope you don't mind me asking these questions on your thread.

:flowers:
 
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rasselas

Guest
...

First off, this is the age of the paranoid general disclaimer, so:

I neither support people in their choice to take drugs or in their choice not to take drugs. Anything I write here is intended for information purposes only.

Seroquel.

(1) How does it work? Simple answer: no one really knows.

(2) Is it better than placebo? Probably not.

(3) Is it addicting? Yes.

(4) Any physical complications associated with this drug?

Yes.

Weight gain. Average about 2kg per year.
Diabetes.
Increased Cholesterol.
Heart disease (average reduced lifespan for longterm use - 25-30 years)... this is the number one killer from these drugs.
NMS. Neuro-malignant syndrome. A what? Basically a sudden and fatal reaction to the drug - the body gets confused and attacks the brain as a foreign invader.
Kidney disease.
Liver disease.
Increased risk of all cancers.
Increased risk of eye diseases.
Tardive dyskinesia - basically drug-induced parkinsons disease.
Increased blood pressure, cholesteral.
Reduced orgasm and sexual response.

That's the physical malarkey.

Now the psychological:

Anxiety
Psychosis
Depression
Anger
Irritability
Depression
Mania
Violence

These drugs can potentially land a person in a lot of trouble...

Advantages - will switch you off emotionally. For a while. But after a few months, these drugs stop 'working'. Whatever unknown way they work on the brain, they stop being able to do it. This is because the brain fights against the drug and tries to restore its natural balance.

Drugs do not cure symptoms, remember, they mask them. The biggest risk is that you are damaging your brain so that you are adding to your problems.

Psychiatrists don't mind this as you will be a good customer. You'll be going back to them for years.

Has this been biased? Maybe a little bit at the end. All the factual info is out there. They don't make it so easy for you to find the truth though...

You have to decide what's best for you.

one last one - skin problems, very common. the brain tissue and the dermis form from the same cells during early developmennt. its why psychological stress and skin conditions are often so linked. and why these brain drugs often cause skin reactions like rashes (and much worse but im not going to talk about that, its a bit too hammer horror.)
 
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raven

raven

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
761
Location
Bristol
Sadly, no. This is off-label use. Not that the on-label use is without controversy. But that's another story. Neuroleptics dampen overall brain function. Like turning the volume dial down on major brain regions, particularly reducing emotions and the sense of now. Long-term, though, you are running a very high risk of adding a lot more to the cart than you started out with.

Have you tried psychotherapy?
I'm currently having psychotherapy and its helping. I'm still suffering from anxiety though. Your post on anti-psychotics is an eye opener.

raven
 
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rasselas

Guest
...

if I was you, I would (if you havent already)...

- consult with a dietician
- take daily rigorous excercise - get that heart beating fast
- cut out all caffeine products and stimulants - chocolate, fizzy drinks, tea, coffee etc
- drink lots of water
- eat healthy snacks throughout the day to maintain blood-sugar

I'm glad you have managed to secure psychotherapy. it's never an easy choice but I hope you get something out of it.

good luck.

btw the patents on many antipsychotics are running out soon, so there is a big push to maximise profits. thats why we are witnessing so much off-label use... the supporting science for these off-label uses is utterly futile and largely corrupt. but again, thats another story.

i wish you the best. :)
 
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skyblue

Guest
I've taken so many different types of medication in the past 17yrs and although they initially worked well for me, after sometime they stopped working, and I've ended up being physically hooked.

I can't see Quetiapine being no different from the rest, which is why I decided to stop taking it now rather than later. I was on this drug for 8 months.

I wish so much that I could turn back time and wish that I found alternative ways to deal with my illness, whatever that might be. I sometimes think to myself that I do not have Bipolar as they say I do - afterall, it affects everybody differently and it's a huge spectrum of a Label.

I know I have emotional problems - I become upset far too easily and I have to find a good alternative way to approach these difficulties.

Many alternative therapies seem to be quite expensive, unfortuately I'm unable to try these out right now, but I'm hoping to in the near future.
 
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skyblue

Guest
Well, it seems my anxiety came back with a vengeance. I had to go straight back on Quetiapine and thank goodness it gave me an immediate sense of calm. I wasn't expecting the anxiety to suddenly hit me in the face like that - it was awful.

I need to be more prepared for next time, I've recently spoken to my partner who has got in touch with an Accupuncturist. I hope to work with him when next coming off my medication by having Accupuncture Therapy at the same time.

Raven - Have you thought anymore about medication, or are you trying to stay medication free ?

I suppose after hearing so much negative info about anti-p's your most probably entirely put off.

How are you feeling now ?

:flowers:
 
raven

raven

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Joined
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Messages
761
Location
Bristol
Raven - Have you thought anymore about medication, or are you trying to stay medication free ?

I suppose after hearing so much negative info about anti-p's your most probably entirely put off.

How are you feeling now ?

:flowers:
Hi there Skyblue. There was a lot of negative information but I'm still wanting to be on something to remove my anxiety. I'm going to see my GP tomorrow to discuss things with him. My brain wave is to slowly reduce the risperidone down and then swap onto seroquel. I'm hoping, infact praying, that the restlessness and anxiety I'm currently feeling will reduce.

I'm still feeling very restless and since starting to reduce the rispierodone down by a just 0.5 mg I'm now also anxious.

Life is a bit like hell at the moment.

On another thread it was suggested that I should reduce caffine, and exercise loads. I'm doing that also but so far to no avail.

*hugs*

raven
 
S

skyblue

Guest
Hi Raven,

Yes eating healthily, regular exercise, cutting out caffeine and alcohol (i'm pretty much tee-total now) helps a great deal.

I exercise regulary and I find it's the best therapy ever. It's just unfortunate that the calm feelings only last a couple of hours afterwards, this is where I could then do more, but with a family and home to look after, we can't always be down the gym.

Exercise in combination with other things will help. I'm currently looking back into Aromatherapy and have ordered some oils online, I drink herbal teas and eat healthy meals.

I would love to go medication free, but It's proving extremely difficult. I have Bipolar which I can manage, but the anxiety I find more upsetting than anything else.

I'm looking into Accupuncture at the moment, I'm hoping he will help me come off my medication.

I'm also booking up a Yoga course, this should help too.

Good luck with your appointment tomorrow, let us know how you get on.

:flowers:
 
raven

raven

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Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
761
Location
Bristol
Tell me how the accupunture goes, I've always been tempted by that but I've never had the courage.

The appointment with the GP didn't go as I had planned. He suggested I increase the risperidone back up until I see the pdoc. I couldn't resist the suggestion so agreed to do that and handle the restlessness for the next 4 weeks. :(

raven
 
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skyblue

Guest
Tell me how the accupunture goes, I've always been tempted by that but I've never had the courage.

The appointment with the GP didn't go as I had planned. He suggested I increase the risperidone back up until I see the pdoc. I couldn't resist the suggestion so agreed to do that and handle the restlessness for the next 4 weeks. :(

raven
Oh that's ashame, I thought you were seeing the PDoc. If you're really struggling though Raven, you could try and get your appointment moved forward, I've done this many times.

Do you suffer with another illness too ? Was just wondering why they prescribed you Risperidone in the first place. Still doc knows much better than I do. Maybe the increase of Risperidone will work for you.

Hope you feel much better soon. :hug:

Once i've got my Acupuncture sessions sorted, I'll let you know how I get on with it.

Look after yourself Raven. :flowers:
 
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