CBT vs DBT

FootedPJs

FootedPJs

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#1
Anyone tried both of these? Know where I can get some work sheets? Which one works best with a borderline?
 
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LonelyNights

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#2
Hello,

I have done CBT and about to go into DBT...

DBT is usually used to help people with bpd. I think the CBT works with anxiety issues (well thats what i found) for OCD or social anxiety its very helpful..

Have you tried looking on the DBT self help website??
 
deathandsequins

deathandsequins

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#3
If you don't mind me asking, what is DBT? I've had CBT in the past but personally didn't find it all that helpful. (I'm not borderline tho so it might be different for you.)
 
FootedPJs

FootedPJs

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#4
If you don't mind me asking, what is DBT? I've had CBT in the past but personally didn't find it all that helpful. (I'm not borderline tho so it might be different for you.)
DBT is Dialectical Behavioral Therapy... I'm currently doing CBT and haven't had much improvement. I was doing some research today and there seems to be a lot of positive information about DBT. Just need something to help me. Here's a link to more information about DBT:

http://www.dbtselfhelp.com/
 
FootedPJs

FootedPJs

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#6
Hello,

I have done CBT and about to go into DBT...

DBT is usually used to help people with bpd. I think the CBT works with anxiety issues (well thats what i found) for OCD or social anxiety its very helpful..

Have you tried looking on the DBT self help website??

Yes, I have looked on that site.. Kinda confused about it. Just checked it out today.
 
Girl Interrupted

Girl Interrupted

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#8
I did CBT years ago, although with an unqualified adult social worker, one who knew next to nothing. I also found lots of books, bought them and found online worksheets that were helpful to me. I continued this for 4 years alone. I showed my CBT folder to a CPN and my now previous therapist (who had worked at a DBT TC), who were impressed at the amount of work I had completed as a form of self help. It is good ground work to moving on to DBT, emotion regulation etc.

I have also utilised e-couch & mood gym which are online CBT sites, recommended by GP's.

DBT is the 'treatment of choice for those with BPD' and is recommended in the NICE Guideline. DBT worksheets can be found on this site:


http://www.box.com/shared/lklf27zonx

http://practicegroundprojects.wetpaint.com/page/DBT+Handouts,+Protocols+&+Client+Learning+Activities
 
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FootedPJs

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#9
Thank you so much for this information! I need to aattempt something .. I can't take being like this.
 
FootedPJs

FootedPJs

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#11
I go to therapy once a week. I'm on Effexor too. I have been diagnosed with BPD, major depressive, and with an anxiety disorder.
 
Girl Interrupted

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#12
What modality is the therapist trained in? How are you finding the venlafaxine?

If you have anxiety try googling 'Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercises', do the as part of your daily routine and see if it helps take the edge off, it should as it was recommended to me by an independent specialist p/doc. If you find the exercises hard to begin with do not be discouraged as it proves they're working; if you are consistent you should see some improvement after 2-3 weeks, I certainly did, but you have to keep the exercises up and include them into your daily routine. I ceased doing the breathing exercises thinking I had regulated my breathing pattern, I was very mistaken and have ended up back at square one, starting over.

Diaphragmatic breathing is intended to help you use the diaphragm correctly while breathing to:

Strengthen the diaphragm
Decrease the work of breathing by slowing your breathing rate
Decrease oxygen demand
Use less effort and energy to breathe
Diaphragmatic breathing technique

1. Lie on your back on a flat surface or in bed, with your knees bent and your head supported. You can use a pillow under your knees to support your legs. Place one hand on your upper chest and the other just below your rib cage. This will allow you to feel your diaphragm move as you breathe.

2. Breathe in slowly through your nose so that your stomach moves out against your hand. The hand on your chest should remain as still as possible.
3. Tighten your stomach muscles, letting them fall inward as you exhale through pursed lips (see "Pursed Lip Breathing Technique"). The hand on your upper chest must remain as still as possible.

When you first learn the diaphragmatic breathing technique, it may be easier for you to follow the instructions lying down, as shown on the first page. As you gain more practice, you can try the diaphragmatic breathing technique while sitting in a chair, as shown below.

To perform this exercise while sitting in a chair:

1. Sit comfortably, with your knees bent and your shoulders, head and neck relaxed.

2. Place one hand on your upper chest and the other just below your rib cage. This will allow you to feel your diaphragm move as you breathe.

3. Tighten your stomach muscles, letting them fall inward as you exhale through pursed lips (see "Pursed Lip Breathing Technique"). The hand on your upper chest must remain as still as possible.

Note: You may notice an increased effort will be needed to use the diaphragm correctly. At first, you'll probably get tired while doing this exercise. But keep at it, because with continued practice, diaphragmatic breathing will become easy and automatic.

How often should I practice this exercise?
At first, practice this exercise 5-10 minutes about 3-4 times per day. Gradually increase the amount of time you spend doing this exercise, and perhaps even increase the effort of the exercise by placing a book on your abdomen.
 
FootedPJs

FootedPJs

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#13
You know, now that you asked... I'm not entirely sure! Looks like I need to find that out from her this week. As far as my Effexor goes... I started out on 37.5 then doubled that after two weeks. I felt great the first month and a half. Then my life started going nuts and the depression got worse. The doctor increased me to 112.75 mg a day now and I don't feel any improvement at all. That's why I was considering some work sheets or something.
 
Girl Interrupted

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#16
Is there any possibility of having a CPN or adult social worker assigned to your care. BPD is not something to try go alone, I have had to do so for over a year after having my care pulled by CMHS management and I am struggling more than ever.
 
FootedPJs

FootedPJs

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#17
I'll check to see what I can manage. I def need something.
 
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lostminty

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#18
I haven't been dxed with BPD but i did find DBT and the mindfulness exercises helpful. Mindfulness comes from some types of meditation practice. it is exercising your ability to just observe your thoughts without judgement.

My meditation supporter describes it as remembering
 

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