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  • Safety Notice: This section on Psychiatric Drugs/Medications enables people to share their personal experiences of using such drugs/medications. Always seek the advice of your doctor, psychiatrist or other qualified health professional before making any changes to your medications or with any questions you may have regarding drugs/medications. In considering coming off psychiatric drugs it is very important that you are aware that most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should only be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision.

Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk factors and events associated with second-generation antipsychotic compared to antidepressant use in a non-eld

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firemonkee57

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Mar 23, 2009
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Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk factors and events associated with second-generation antipsychotic compared to antidepressant use in a non-elderly adult sample: results from a claims-based inception cohort study

Keywords:

Second-generation antipsychotics;
essential hypertension;
diabetes mellitus;
hypertensive heart disease;
stroke;
coronary heart disease;
hyperlipidemia

Abstract

This is a study of the metabolic and distal cardiovascular/cerebrovascular outcomes associated with the use of second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) compared to antidepressants (ADs) in adults aged 18-65 years, based on data from Thomson Reuters MarketScan® Research Databases 2006-2010, a commercial U.S. claims database. Interventions included clinicians' choice treatment with SGAs (allowing any comedications) versus ADs (not allowing SGAs). The primary outcomes of interest were time to inpatient or outpatient claims for the following diagnoses within one year of SGA or AD discontinuation: hypertension, ischemic and hypertensive heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Secondary outcomes included the same diagnoses at last follow-up time point, i.e., not censoring observations at 365 days after SGA or AD discontinuation. Cox regression models, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis of schizophrenia and mood disorders, and number of medical comorbidities, were run. Among 284,234 individuals, those within one year of exposure to SGAs versus ADs showed a higher risk of essential hypertension (adjusted hazard ratio, AHR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.12-1.21, p<0.0001), diabetes mellitus (AHR=1.43, CI: 1.33-1.53, p<0.0001), hypertensive heart disease (AHR=1.34, CI: 1.10-1.63, p<0.01), stroke (AHR=1.46, CI: 1.22-1.75, p<0.0001), coronary artery disease (AHR=1.17, CI: 1.05-1.30, p<0.01), and hyperlipidemia (AHR=1.12, CI: 1.07-1.17, p<0.0001). Unrestricted follow-up results were consistent with within one-year post-exposure results. Increased risk for stroke with SGAs has previously only been demonstrated in elderly patients, usually with dementia. This study documents, for the first time, a significantly increased risk for stroke and coronary artery disease in a non-elderly adult sample with SGA use. We also confirm a significant risk for adverse metabolic outcomes. These findings raise concerns about the longer-term safety of SGAs, given their widespread and chronic use.


Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk factors and events associated with second‐generation antipsychotic compared to antidepressant use in a non‐elderly adult sample: results from a claims‐based inception cohort study - Correll
 
SomersetScorpio

SomersetScorpio

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It's important to be informed of these risks.
My GP is pretty good though and I get ECGs every six months.

If people are taking these kinds of meds and don't get regular ECGs, it may be worth mentioning it to the doctors.
It's important that we look after our mental health, sometimes for me that's had to take priority over physical health, but it's definitely worth doing your bit to make sure you're physically safe and sound.
 

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