Can we ever escape the clutches of depression permanantly?

Inthedepths

Inthedepths

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Hi All,

I have been free of medication since June this year and I have been coping relatively well, with the odd couple of bad days but nothing really terrible.

In the last few weeks I have however been contacted by one of the people who was part of the reason I was depressed in the first place.

She contacted me to tell me that their is a job at the company she works for that I would be good for. I have no idea why she would want me to work with her, because she left the company I work at currently because of my depression.

The job itself is over twice as much money as I am currently on, but I don't honestly know that I could work in the same place as her without dropping back into depression. I am already feeling down just thinking about her. After a day or so consideration, I have decided that I will not apply for the job, despite the fact I have been told I could have it if I put an official application in.

The annoying thing is that I thought I was fine. I have been slowly contacting people from before I was depressed, and she was one of the last ones I decided to talk to.

I am guessing this is fairly common, you think you are free, then it comes back and bites you.
 
amathus

amathus

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Hi, have a read of the following: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_depressive_disorder,
you will find that no one person suffers depression in the same way.

I am 58 and have been suffering with major depressive episodes since my twenties....
Obviously one can't predict the future, so asking if depression is life-long is difficult to ascertain.
Some people are more prone to depression than others, variables such as environmental, societal can affect
your predisposition towards having depression.
I was fortunate to work for twenty years before ill-health forced me into early retirement, I wasn't one of the lucky ones tho' as I have never received any therapy.

qf.
 
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ally41

ally41

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It may help if you realise that depression is not a disease. Scientists may claim to have found chemical changes in some people with depression but research is usually carried out by drug companies and are very subjective - there are just as many studies who have found no changes at all. In any case, if changes ARE present, there is no evidence that is is chemical changes that CAUSE depression in the first place. There is no evidence to show that being on a course of anti-depressants 'cures' people, either in the short term or better still, long-term and some studies show them to be no better than a placebo. There ARE many studies however that show that psychodynamic therapy IS effective long term.

The reason for this, many believe, is that depression is a symptom - not a disease. Depression is the mind's natural defence response either to protect you from further trauma, or from being stuck with life situations or interpersonal relationships that are harmful and that we don't know how to change. When one has withdrawn to keep safe from perceived harm (existing or not) and when one is repeatedly 'stuck', hopelessness and ultimately depression follow.

Psychodynamic therapy can help you to unpick the puzzle of why you react to life with depression. There is no use trying to ignore it, or to try to deny the deep rooted problems with denial or 'positive thinking exercises'. Once you have got to the root of the problem that you have with this woman and others like her, you can start to learn how to avoid them and seek out healthier relationships and your internal intrapsychic processes will change. Part of you already knows how to do this - hence the hesitation to take up the job offer.

It may also help you to think of yourself as as parts rather than one whole, these parts may often feel different emotions about the same person or event - this explains why sometimes you struggle to make decisions and why some decisions may seem right at the time and then a mistake later on. Psychodynamic therapy helps you to identify and communicate with the different parts and to gain internal harmony.

Yes, you can solve depression, but only by getting to root of what causes it and learning how to make a better world for yourself. I would advise you to avoid CBT, it just tries to force you to 'put a happy face on' and that doesn't change you in the long term. Good luck.
 
ally41

ally41

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I think major depression is very serious and not something that someone who is currently able to work is likely to have. Just my opinion...
 
Inthedepths

Inthedepths

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I was diagnosed with moderate psychotic depression. I have no idea how anyone copes with major depression as I had enough problems with mine being moderate.

I was on medication for around two years before I was transferred away from a specialist mental hospital where I was an out-patient, back to my GP because my condition had stopped getting worse. However within two months my GP had decided I was better!

I was never offered therapy either. I dont know if it would do me any good. I "recovered" by accepting my situation. I dont beleive I am cured, or that anything that was causing me to be depressed has gone, because it hasn't. I just accept that unlike other people, I am not going to be happy.
 
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amathus

amathus

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I think major depression is very serious and not something that someone who is currently able to work is likely to have. Just my opinion...
Indeed, I fought it so many times...
In the end it got the better of me, so to speak, I was hospitalised and consequently lost my job..

I agree major depression is very serious having felt the different levels of it...
as in all other problems there are varying 'shades' of major depression, and of course there a variety of ways in
which we react to and cope with it....IMO....
qf.
 
A

Ainsworth

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I think major depression is very serious and not something that someone who is currently able to work is likely to have. Just my opinion...
i agree, ive suffered from depression since i was a 12 and thought up until 2 years ago that i had bad depression when it was moderate, i cant describe the severe depression i had. i lost my job and everything. it took along time for it to lift. it was a longer battle then before. moderate depression (though it bad) doesnt scare me anymore. another mental breakdown does. :(
 
L

lozza

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I think that what you put is pretty common. I mean take me for example i am fine but if i am driving past my local a&e i can get down and feel awful as i remember all the times i was in there for sh. I was diagnosed with servere depression by CAMHS in 2009. I too struggle explaining how bad my depression was... in the ' long story' I nearly didn't make it onto the second year of my college course as my grades and attendence was so poor, i was getting phone calls from the attendence officer person at college so much i put her in my contacts! I was crying every night for hours on end, suicidal most days. I got very little sleep, doing about 21 hour days with 3 hours sleep for .. about 5 months i ended up with a very weak immune system and would spend up to a week at a time of college with some bug, i nearly lost my job. I was nearly stopped from leaving A&E after self harm as a nurse thought i wouldn't be able to keep myself safe. In short.. depression nearly killed me 13 times. The darkest memory i have to date was when i ended up in hospital and it was a wake up call , big time. If i had been completely honest with the crisis team assessing my the next day i would have ended up on a psych unit for sure, i lied as i couldn't have my horse taken away ( that is what would have happened if i did). The last... 2 years i have been in a very very dark place.
 
C

clarabow

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Hi Ally.
I have had CRB and for me it felt far too clinical, did not help me at all though I know of others it has. But the psychodymamic approach sounds much more useful, thanks for this useful post.
 
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