• Welcome! It’s great to see you. Our forum members are people, maybe like yourself, who experience mental health difficulties or who have had them at some point in their life.

    If you'd like to talk with people who know what it's like

Can Borderline Personality Disorder be treated without drugs?

D

Duchess

Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Messages
16
Location
Essex
Hi, I have been diagnosed with BPD four years ago now, having had the symptoms since I was around 11, maybe earlier. I am now 36. I am not on any meds but have been on them a few times since 1997. Mainly prozac and citalopram and only for very short periods at a time. I am not feeling great right now and having read a few things on the forum am unsure whether to go back on meds as am scared I wont get off them again. I do feel that my symptoms are getting worse with each passing year and I am struggling to hold down my job sometimes. I work full time but its a struggle. I work for the NHS so its been kind of hard to lie about my illness but I have somehow managed to keep it pretty quiet. What I am asking is, does this just continually get worse or can I be treated and keep it under control? I have no issues taking medication but do not want to lose my driving license because of medication and MH issues. Duchess.:confused:
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
Hi. It is your choice as to whether to take meds or not. I am of the camp, that given the right support & help, the majority of people can recover from even the most severe of mental illness; med free. Finding such help & support is another matter.

In my own opinion, there are a few whose best option is meds. But at the exclusion of available, viable & effective "non med" treatments - it seems in 99.9% of cases - that the choice is meds or nothing; in the UK anyway.

I think it is a decision to be weighed up careful; as to what is best for your self. I do not think it is anyone's right to tell you either way to not take; or to take meds. The majority of people here, however will recommend meds.
 
intelgal

intelgal

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2008
Messages
1,413
Location
Yorkshire
Was going to say as Ms P could you go down the therepy route. I work for the NHS and have found occupational health very helpful they cannot tell your manager and all access to service is confidential. They have access to therepies and other support and is done confidentially
 
ellamental

ellamental

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
May 31, 2008
Messages
70
Location
midlands
mentalisation

dialectical behavoural therapy (books by marsha lineham) and mentalisation as well
take care:grouphug:
 
D

Dollit

Guest
DBT is available on the NHS - is your son/daughter already in the system? If so then their psychiatrist/psychologist is the person to make a referral. If you search for dialectical nhs uk [region] then you will bring something up for your area.
 
Merlin

Merlin

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2008
Messages
73
DBT is available on the NHS - is your son/daughter already in the system? If so then their psychiatrist/psychologist is the person to make a referral. If you search for dialectical nhs uk [region] then you will bring something up for your area.
Thanks ....... I've had a look through, and fingers crossed, I have her booked in with a Clinical psychologist next week.
 
Merlin

Merlin

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2008
Messages
73
Thanks ....... I've had a look through, and fingers crossed, I have her booked in with a Clinical psychologist next week.
Does anyone have any views on Clinical Psychologists?
 
D

Dollit

Guest
Clinical psychologists are like anyone else - there's good ones and not so good ones. A lot of it is down to chemistry between them and the client but then that's true for most interactions.

The psychologist should do an assessment and make a plan, ask your daughter what she'd like out of the sessions or a target to aim for and then the work begins.
 
Merlin

Merlin

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2008
Messages
73
Clinical psychologists are like anyone else - there's good ones and not so good ones. A lot of it is down to chemistry between them and the client but then that's true for most interactions.

The psychologist should do an assessment and make a plan, ask your daughter what she'd like out of the sessions or a target to aim for and then the work begins.

Thank you Dollit, The NHS in our area isn't great, and she hasn't got much confidence in them, so we're going to try this guy privately. But typical mother here..... was hoping lots of you would post saying, "yeah all Clinical Psychologists are really Magicians and she'll be fine in a fortnight"
 
D

Dollit

Guest
Psychology sessions take a long time. Psychology is about changing thinking and changing behaviour and that doesn't come quickly. But once you do learn to change your thinking you do become more open to other positive influences. Having had the experience myself twice I am glad I did both courses though the second wasn't really successful. But I tried and that's all that counts. Hope it works out for you.
 
T

Trish

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 4, 2009
Messages
52
I am BPD and applied for CBT but was refused on the NHS ( all the abbriviations lmao)

They had cut the criteria to thoughs who hit a target of 10 points (what they mean is they had very little funding and pick and choose people who they think will gain the most out of it) I have heard and read a fair bit about it and in truth without knowing it I have been using many of the ways they say for a few years myself lol.

Good luck hope the funding is good in your areas.
 
Top