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CAMHS and ADHD assessment

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connersmummy

New member
Joined
May 12, 2014
Messages
2
Anyone taken their young child to CAMHS and had them assessed for ADHD etc?

I would like to know more about everyones experience, what they do and what they ask?

What are the best ways to prepare yourself for your intial assessment visit other than filling in the strengths and difficulties questionnaire.
 
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Rose19602

Guest
Hmmm....I didn't get as far as CAMHS because I decided to deal with it myself. Not sure if that was a good decision or not tbh.

You can't get help or treatment without an assessment, but you need to be very sure that the help and treatment on offer is the right kind.

Amphetamines are a concern IMO - particularly for young children. Behavioural support is helpful however, although the labelling has implications for school and stigma. However, if severe, school will be better equipped to deal with your child and you will have fewer scrapes with authority.

I saw a paediatrician. My kids ran under the doctor's table, swung from the cubicle curtains, wouldn't sit down, giggled uncontrollably and delved in all the drawers and generally stressed me out! She asked me about co-morbid conditions - dyslexia, dyspraxia, autistic tendencies, OCD, tourettes/tics - then suggested that she was pretty sure it was ADHD/ADD and offered a referral to CAMHS.

I didn't like it one bit - a referral to mental health services at 7 yrs - so I refused to go.

Still not sure I did the right thing....the ensuing years were difficult, but I decided to treat the high jinx as normal, gave them loads of outdoor activity and exercise, was a stay at home mum and worked with them through the procrastination and inattention at school and supported the dyslexia diagnosis. The tics worried the sh*t out of me tbh....but they peaked at 11 then disappeared in mid teens. The dyslexia is mild and has not hampered them too much.

Mental health has now come up as a hereditary condition (undefined diagnosis atm) within the family, although anxiety/depression has been filed for me and anxiety for the children. Was it nature or nurture? No idea....I worried about them a lot and perhaps passed my anxieties on. It certainly made me unwell.

Advice: Go in with an open mind. I would reject the drugs personally for a young child, and I would accept anything that is supportive and helpful. Look for support for yourself too. If you can cope your child will do better. Try to think of the condition as a cluster of symptoms in childhood that will wax and wane and that are not for ever. Many people dx'd with ADHD do incredibly well in life as they are often fearless, enterprising and entrepreneurial....they also have their difficulties due to carelessness and inattention.

I tend to treat it as a personality type and think coping strategies to deal with lively behaviour and inattention are key. I like kids who are lively....they are interesting and proper kids! Try to think positive and fit life around your child, rather than trying to make your child fit into life - sitting still, being attentive for long periods, thinking in a way that the educational system imposes. Be relaxed about the small stuff, but keep him/her out of danger and away from too much criticism.

Apart from that....wait and see what transpires. Labelling and drugging when that young is harmful IMO.
 
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connersmummy

New member
Joined
May 12, 2014
Messages
2
Hiya, I won't be interested in medication, I think aged 6 is way to young for him to have such strong meds.
Also I home educate him, so because he is not in a school setting I think that helps abit, it means he can be more impulsive and active at home without any major issues, like teachers don't have the time or patience to deal with .
 
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