Buddhism, mindfulness and wellbeing

Parayana

Parayana

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Wow had to do a search for onedays old thread it was so far down in the spirituality section, just been dealing with a bad bout of paranoia, came on about two AM, largely brought on by neighbours loud telly, eventually decided that the only way I was going to deal with it was through meditation, laid on the bed in the reclining Buddha pose and breathed gently labelling the emotion fear, fear Mahasi style and opening to the emotion neither resisting or encouraging it - just let it be, after about forty minutes it passed. Not to bad, there is something to be said for mindfulness.

Years ago I would have gone up the all night Tesco and bought a bottle of Smirnoff to deal with it by drunken oblivion. I'd call that progress.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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I felt this deserved a spot in this thread... And Parayana... the reason you couldn't find the thread in the Spirituality forum is because it's in the Mindfulness forum, lol!

 
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Kerome

Kerome

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"The teachings of Buddhism is about giving up evil
and practising good. Then, when evil is given up and
good is established, we must let go of both good and
evil."
- Ajahn Chah

The collected teachings of Ajahn Chah can be found here:
https://www.abhayagiri.org/media/books/Chah_The_Collected_Teachings_of_Ajahn_Chah.pdf

It's quite a large tome, but a treasury of dharma talks by the renowned monk from the Thai Forest tradition. If you are into Buddhism and have progressed beyond the basics it is well worth checking out, he goes into a lot of quite advanced topics such as good and bad types of samadhi.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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For those who are interested, here is an excellent resource of Buddhist writings. It may be slightly slanted towards the scholastic, but even some new authors are represented such as Stephen Batchelor.

A Handful of Leaves - Library
 
cpuusage

cpuusage

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i find the following a very interesting quote from the book 'The Phoenix' by Manly P. Hall, about the contemplative / spiritual practises & self realisation.

i would wager that it is true that few people attain Enlightenment in this life, for various reasons.

i have copies of some of his other books as well & would recommend them to people interested in the subject.

"In every life there must come that supreme moment when, for the first time, the soul recognizes its kinship with the greatness which lies beyond material conception. The moment of this realization is actually the moment of birth. Previous to this state, there is only an animal existence, but the true self comes into being, conjured up by that realization which recognizes the necessity for that self. In every age a few awake from the troubled sleep of materiality and by awakening discover mortality with all its attendant consequences to be but the figment of a dream.

It is impossible to live well without a rational perspective on life. Life, therefore, seems hopeless and purposeless to the great body of humanity. True knowledge must be that knowledge by which we come to know the reason for the circumstances which make up our mortal span. Realization is the supreme intellectual faculty, for by realization we come to know of the existence of reality. But only through a still superior discipline, which the mystics have come to designate meditation, can one identify himself with those realities which heretofore he has only mentally recognized and accepted.

Metaphysical philosophy divides all mankind into three orders: the first and lowest, those who do not know and cannot see; second, those who know a little and see a little but have very limited understanding; third, that small group of enlightened ones who, knowing and seeing, have identified themselves in consciousness with that which they have known and seen. Only the latter are truly wise, and in them the Law is perfected."

Manly P. Hall
The Phoenix: The Practice of Meditation
 
G

GirasoleL

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I personally consider meditation and mindfulness to be one of my literal lifesavers. I will have to check out all the links shared on here.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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I love returning to this thread every once in a while... it's very calming.

MEDITATION: CALMING THE MIND
By Bob Sharples

Don’t meditate to fix yourself, to improve yourself, to redeem yourself; rather, do it as an act of love, of deep warm friendship to yourself. In this way there is no longer any need for the subtle aggression of self-improvement, for the endless guilt of not doing enough. It offers the possibility of an end to the ceaseless round of trying so hard that wraps so many people’s lives in a knot. Instead there is now meditation as an act of love. How endlessly delightful and encouraging.
 
Teddy Bear

Teddy Bear

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I do mindfulness at home. I was looking at a place in London the other day, I think it was called the London Buddhist Centre. I would feel a bit embarassed going on my own, though.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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There are many great Buddhist resources on the Internet, but this is one of the best, the access to insight page where Thanissaro Bhikkhu’s translations of sutras are stored. It’s Theravada buddhism, but having direct access to the sutra texts is wonderful.

Access to Insight
 
Kerome

Kerome

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I want to know about heaven and hell,” said the samurai. “Do they really exist?” he asked Hakuin.

Hakuin looked at the soldier and asked, “Who are you?”

“I am a samurai,” announced the proud warrior.

“Ha!” exclaimed Hakuin. “What makes you think you can understand such insightful things? You are merely a callous, brutish soldier! Go away and do not waste my time with your foolish questions,” Hakuin said, waving his hand to drive away the samurai.

The enraged samurai couldn’t take Hakuin’s insults. He drew his sword, readied for the kill, when Hakuin calmly retorted, “This is hell.”

The soldier was taken aback. His face softened. Humbled by the wisdom of Hakuin, he put away his sword and bowed before the Zen Master.

“And this is heaven,” Hakuin stated, just as calmly.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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One of my favorite documentaries on the Bardo, the Tibetan Buddhist afterlife and how it is treated in Tibet.

 
Kerome

Kerome

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The Buddha was once asked by a follower to provide a one-sentence summary of his teachings, and he said, “nothing whatsoever should be clung to”. If you think about it, that goes quite deep, because we do a lot of clinging, to life goals, possessions, loved ones, careers and other things. If you can manage to let go of your clinging to all these things, to hold them so lightly that it seemed you were hardly touching them at all, then you might find more freedom than you thought you had.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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I was taking a break from mental health forumming, sometimes I can get a bit tired of that and need to do other things to recharge the batteries :) I see the forum has had a face-lift, very nice.

Nice to see you too Fairy Lu! I see a few of the old crowd are still around /wave
 
burt tomato

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Fairy lu just created a thread about you. Some sort of group synchronicity. :eek:
 
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