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Buddhism, mindfulness and wellbeing

oneday

oneday

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I liked watching this documentary yesterday, telling the story, the myths, of the Buddha and something of Buddhist ideas and practice.

 
oneday

oneday

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This thread that I started has reached over 23,000 visits - probably mainly because if you do a Google search (etc) for something like "Buddhism and mental health", or "mindfulness and well-being" you get this page listed. I wonder what all those people have thought of it?



Anyway, some ideas for this morning...


"We must learn to suffer whatever we cannot avoid. Our life is composed, like the harmony of the world, of discords as well as of different tones, sweet and harsh, sharp and flat, soft and loud. If a musician liked only some of them, what could he sing? He has got to know how to use all of them and blend them together. So too must we with good and ill, which are of one substance with our life."

Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592), essayist/philosopher, Essays


"If only we were fruitful fields, we would at bottom let nothing perish unused, and see in every event, thing and man welcome manure."

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900), philosopher, poet, composer


"The lotus is the most beautiful flower, whose petals open one by one. But it will only grow in the mud. In order to grow and gain wisdom, first you must have the mud - the obstacles of life and its suffering. ...The mud speaks of the common ground that humans share, no matter what our stations in life. ...Whether we have it all or we have nothing, we are all faced with the same obstacles: sadness, loss, illness, dying and death. If we are to strive as human beings to gain more wisdom, more kindness and more compassion, we must have the intention to grow as a lotus and open each petal one by one".

Thupten Ngodrup (born 1958), Tibetan Buddhist monk and teacher
 
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oneday

oneday

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Calligraphy by Thich Nhat Hanh, Buddhist
monk, teacher and peace activist
 
oneday

oneday

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Find a place inside where there's joy, and the joy will burn out the pain.

Joseph Campbell
 
megirl

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I have read a couple of books with some aspects of the buddism beliefs its quite inspiring and very grounding.
The mindfulness and well-being aspects are awe-inspiring, just wish I could truly live my life in the moment, let things that have already happened behind you learn but still in that moment.
I probably talking shit atm but yeh I do get a lot out of what info I do have on this faith.

Being a roman catholc and being in a catholic school you are taught basically that the catholics are the ONE and thats how it is.
Fuck when I went to church every now and again with my family all (honestly) I could think about was the roast we were going home to have and thinking why the fuck does it have to be such a cold place. I used to freeze almost to death.
My mother used to glare at me as I didnt join in with the singing.
Number one I cant sing and I didnt know the words so why should I pretend to sing look like a dick.
Even at my dads funeral I didnt sing so why?
All that hell and heaven stuff? Christ(or whoever) knows.

True mindfulness would be the best way to I believe live my life
 
oneday

oneday

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“We think that the point is to pass the test or overcome the problem, but the truth is that things don't really get solved. They come together and they fall apart. Then they come together again and fall apart again. It's just like that. The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen: room for grief, for relief, for misery, for joy. ”

― Pema Chodron, When Things Fall Apart: Heartfelt Advice for Hard Times
 
oneday

oneday

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“Once there was a young warrior.

Her teacher told her that she had to do battle with fear. She didn’t want to do that. It seemed too aggressive; it was scary; it seemed unfriendly.

But the teacher said she had to do it and gave her the instructions for the battle.

The day arrived. The student warrior stood on one side, and fear stood on the other. The warrior was feeling very small, and fear was looking big and wrathful. They both had their weapons.

The young warrior roused herself and went toward fear, prostrated three times, and asked, "May I have permission to go into battle with you?"

Fear said, "Thank you for showing me so much respect that you ask permission."

Then the young warrior said, "How can I defeat you?"

Fear replied, "My weapons are that I talk fast, and I get very close to your face. Then you get completely unnerved, and you do whatever I say. If you don’t do what I tell you, I have no power. You can listen to me, and you can have respect for me. You can even be convinced by me. But if you don’t do what I say, I have no power."

In that way, the student warrior learned how to defeat fear. ”

― Pema Chodron, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice For Difficult Times
 
oneday

oneday

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"In Zen, that which is beyond concepts and words is sometimes called 'suchness' or 'thusness'. It means 'it is so'. It can only be directly experienced.

If you want to know what an orange is like, you have to taste it. If you want to know what the sea is like, you have to see it, or dive in. Then you enter the suchness of an orange or the suchness of the sea.

In Zen, the very beginningness of our life is its suchness. To know that beginningness, you must experience it without concepts."

From 'Sayings and Tales of Zen Buddhism: Reflections for Every Day'
 
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oneday

oneday

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Come sit down beside me I said to myself,
And although it doesn't make sense,
I held my own hand
As a small sign of trust
And together I sat on the fence.

From Short Notes from the Long History of Happiness,
by Michael Leunig
 
oneday

oneday

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“We all go through periods where we feel the wind at our back… when energies are strong, the possibility for confusion goes up.

One of the ways to stay on track is through maintaining equanimity. This does not mean remaining in a state of non-feeling or perpetual placidity. Equanimity is more about what great surfers must possess.

Think about what it must be like to be a world-class surfer. They don’t just set up for the easy waves—their intention is ride all waves with the appropriate combination of focused intensity and easeful letting go. Whether a wave is gentle or roiling, the same degree of focus and release is present. This is the equanimous part. But the wave—now that, no one can predict.

Meditation practice is exactly this—it trains you to meet the whole world, within you and around you, with just such bravery. In meditation, when stressful thoughts arise, you gently let them pass to resume focus on breath. When funny thoughts arise, you do the same, as you do with thoughts that are vicious, confused, trivial, painful. Each time, you let go and come back. The coming back itself is the equanimity, not the thought or its content.

When you can do this on your cushion, you will find that, quite spontaneously, you are better able to come back when your boss is a jerk, your girlfriend is late (again), or your cat pees on your sofa (again). Equanimity on the cushion plants the seeds for equanimity in all things.”

By Susan Piver, Open Heart Project (blog)
 
oneday

oneday

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I haven't posted here for a while. Sometimes - most times - it's about just practicing mindfulness, just sitting in meditation or whatever practice. I like the look of this rug design that I came across...



The practice of Zen is the alarm clock that wakes us up to our lives and enables us to stop sleepwalking through reality. It is the friendly map that says: "Right here is the place. You have always been here. Where else is there? It is the calendar that says: "Right now is the time. Who could want another?"

From 'The Zen of Recovery' by Mel Ash (more at: http://www.melash.com/under_construction.html)
 
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