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Brain fog leads to anxiety and depression?

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Libertynow

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Feb 10, 2017
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I don't even know if I would be considered to have mild, moderate or severe depression. Haven't seen a psychiatrist only a family doctor who prescribed me zoloft. I started 25mg for 1 week than up to 50mg for another 3 weeks than up to 75mg for about a week and a half. I had a period on the 50mg where it felt like it was working, than it went flat than 75mg again a period where it felt like it was working than went flat again and even seemed like I went backwards.

For me I go up and down with my mood. Psychologist and family doctor both believe it's a clinical depression issue. Zoloft worked wonders twice before in the past, but I guess because the two times in the past I was so depressed I couldn't really notice the negative effects of taking an anti-depressant where you sometimes feel worse before getting better. This time around I'm noticing the worse, however I do still have good days on the 75mg.

I sometimes have moments in the morning, during the day, and in the evening where it seems like I just snap out of it. When I say snap out of it I mean out of my head. I have this issue where I I'm overly focused on my inner feelings in my gut and mind. I will often connect everything to depression and anxiety. Even a cold and sinus pressure has my mind linking it to depression and anxiety. Instead of just seeing it for what it is. If I'm doing something very distracting where I'm not living inside my head I actually feel normal for that moment. I even feel the normal when I meditate. But I keep on going back inside my head.

Is it normal to still not have full effect of zoloft after almost 6 weeks on 75mg? I feel like if I didn't have the brain fog I would go inside my head. But the brain fog comes first and than I start analyzing it to death to the point where I get stuck. I've had brain fog my whole life I believe but just now I'm stuck linking it to depression and anxiety so it doesn't just stop at awareness anymore.
 
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BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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Hi, did they test your Vitamin D levels because the brain fog you describe is typical?

Best
BDU
 
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Libertynow

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I don't think they did. If it's not part of a routine blood work than I would say no they have not.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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I don't think they did. If it's not part of a routine blood work than I would say no they have not.
You have to ask for the test specially in Australia.

I would assume you are low, personally, its something like 1 in 4 down here so its got to be even higher in the UK. 1 in 2 are probably low.

You feel bloody awful, I was tired all the time, and what really did it is the breathlessness, and my legs started to feel like jelly, I could barely walk up the stairs. Everything was affected and if youre low all the ADs in the world wont "take" properly because you actually have a physical condition that just gets worse.

Also my eyesight was affected, I became night blind, and I ended up with arthritis in my hip and losing 6 teeth. :(
 
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Alanlow

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Nov 2, 2016
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Well they do say these medication can take up to 2 months to work. Oddly enough, anytime I've stopped a medication for some time and then went back on, I never felt like it works much anymore either. Also I find that anti anxiety medications make my head extra foggy. Maybe it's time to try something else?
 
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Libertynow

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The thing is the brain fog was a recurring issue before the medication. If anything the medication has helped reduce the brain fog somewhat. Although sometimes I have bad days. My anxiety has improved on the medication as well. Just again I get these bad days that make me question the medication. I see the family doctor Monday see what he thinks. My psychologist thinks that I should give it more time. She thinks it's the right medication simply cause it has reduced anxiety.

When I'm distracted doing an activity that takes my attention away from inner focus I feel normal again. Just wish I could stay in that normal feeling when not busy doing something :)
 
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jajingna

jajingna

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I never knew this term "brain fog" before a couple months ago. I think it's also related to a bad diet that is high in carbs and sugars, which is what most people are eating every day with breads, cereals, pasta, rice and sugary junk. I imagine then that most people are in this foggy state most of the time. Maybe it has to do with all the glucose in the bloodstream that gets transported all over the body and perhaps a solid amount of that goes up into the brain.

When I cut back on sugar and starchy foods like potatoes I noticed the fog lifting. It was a sort of clarity that was not usually part of my experience. Fasting really does the trick for increasing mental acuity, and this perhaps to do with lowered glucose (lowered insulin too). You'll notice after a big high carb meal or sugary food or drink, you may feel good for a little while, but your attention span is wayward as glucose needs to be stored with insulin secretion.

I see this in my brother every day. His attention span is poor and he's constantly eating loads of sweet stuffs and carbs. His mood and energy take sharp rises and falls perhaps due to all the hormonal activity this sort of eating routine entails. So he'll be on a sugar or dopamine (dopey mind?) rush and be happy and talkative for a bit, then he'll come down from it, feeling lazy and fatigued, and before long eating again as the roller coaster goes on, day after day. He believes he has ADHD. I just think it's all the damn sugar.
 
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Alexander Ypsilantis

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I never knew this term "brain fog" before a couple months ago. I think it's also related to a bad diet that is high in carbs and sugars, which is what most people are eating every day with breads, cereals, pasta, rice and sugary junk. I imagine then that most people are in this foggy state most of the time. Maybe it has to do with all the glucose in the bloodstream that gets transported all over the body and perhaps a solid amount of that goes up into the brain.

When I cut back on sugar and starchy foods like potatoes I noticed the fog lifting. It was a sort of clarity that was not usually part of my experience. Fasting really does the trick for increasing mental acuity, and this perhaps to do with lowered glucose (lowered insulin too). You'll notice after a big high carb meal or sugary food or drink, you may feel good for a little while, but your attention span is wayward as glucose needs to be stored with insulin secretion.

I see this in my brother every day. His attention span is poor and he's constantly eating loads of sweet stuffs and carbs. His mood and energy take sharp rises and falls perhaps due to all the hormonal activity this sort of eating routine entails. So he'll be on a sugar or dopamine (dopey mind?) rush and be happy and talkative for a bit, then he'll come down from it, feeling lazy and fatigued, and before long eating again as the roller coaster goes on, day after day. He believes he has ADHD. I just think it's all the damn sugar.
You may have a sugar tolerance problem, you need to get a glucose tolerance test performed at your physician. The test takes 4-5 hours, they test you every hour after you consume a glucose beverage.

I had a severe case of hypoglycemia when I was younger and I experienced a lot of the 'brain fog' sensation you noted-especially when my blood sugar was low. The last few years my low blood sugar has moderated (I've become almost diabetic today, at 65) and the 'brain fog' has almost gone away. Hence, I believe it was related to the hypoglycemia.

Low blood sugar can contribute to depression, you need to get it checked out. As for the Zoloft-I have been on Paxil for many decades due to a genetic predisposition to depression. It takes 6-8 weeks for your body to acclimate to the SSRI's, or to adjust to a changed dosage. Give it time, it's not instantaneous. But the blood sugar should be emphasized, the sooner it can be checked out the better.

In general people should avoid processed sugar, our bodies have not evolved to metabolize pure cane or beet sugar-it's too strong. Natural sugars like fructose are much better for you-even when I had hypoglycemia I never had a problem with fruit. Fructose metabolizes much more naturally. But pure sugar had me into wild mood swings within 15 minutes of consuming it, that's how I initially discovered my hypoglycemia.
 
jajingna

jajingna

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Table sugar is half glucose and half fructose. The fructose is hard on the liver. Fruit is different because of the fiber. Robert Lustig is one good source for this kind of information. He specializes in childhood obesity.
 
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