Brain changes following cognitive therapy for psychosis.

F

firemonkee57

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Messages
8,201
#1
I've always been impressed by work of the sort done by Schwartz and others that shows behavioral cognitive therapy (BCT), when effective for obsessive-compulsive disorder, causes changes in brain activity similar to those caused by drugs that also alleviate symptoms. (One example of a BCT trick: instruct the patient, when symptoms appear, to think "That's not me, that's a part of my brain that is not working.") The journal BRAIN offers an open access article by Kumari et al. that makes further correlations of BCT with brain activity. They observe that in schizophrenia patients whose normal therapy is supplemented with cognitive behavior therapy there is decreased activation in several areas in response to fearful and angry expressions.

The cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis...showed decreased activation of the inferior frontal, insula, thalamus, putamen and occipital areas to fearful and angry expressions at treatment follow-up compared with baseline. Reduction of functional magnetic resonance imaging response during angry expressions correlated directly with symptom improvement. This study provides the first evidence that cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis attenuates brain responses to threatening stimuli and suggests that cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis may mediate symptom reduction by promoting processing of threats in a less distressing way.

http://mindblog.dericbownds.net/2011/09/brain-changes-following-cognitive.html
 
T

Thinking

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 22, 2011
Messages
65
#2
Cool - the new brain research offering therapy that can change neural networks and brain pattern is fascinating. What I love about it is that the brain is always growing and changing and it can be intentionally changed through practice of specific techniques
 
A

Apollon

Guest
#3
Thank you very much for that link!
My psychologist, a friend from Germany, she claimed that every disorder (MH) can be cured, or at least very helped by use of psychotherapy, and various other techniques, but I never had opportunity to read on that subject before, so thank you :)
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
#4
claimed that every disorder (MH) can be cured, or at least very helped by use of psychotherapy, and various other techniques
& that has been known for over a hundred years...

“I have now, after long practical experience, come to hold the view that the psychogenic causation of the disease is more probable than the toxic [physico-chemical] causation. There are a number of mild and ephemeral but manifestly schizophrenic illnesses - quite apart from the even more common latent psychoses - which begin purely psychogenically, run an equally psychological course (aside from certain presumably toxic nuances) and can be completely cured by a purely psychotherapeutic procedure. I have seen this even in severe cases”.

- Carl Jung
 
A

Apollon

Guest
#5
For me that was discovery and journey into unknown world Apotheosis...
In my country, you'll get drugged, or you won't be treated at all.
There are almost no real psycho therapists, nobody works with EMDR, hypnotherapy, and other kinds of therapy...
The crown of so called psycho therapy here is a process in which doctor convince patient to be normal, literally. Doctor is convincing me to go out, to a party, because that is supposed to be normal behavior for my age. And he calls that conversation "psychotherapy"... Everyone can try to convince you to do some expected to be done things... Rubbish.
I don't even know how psychotherapy looks like. But my German psychologist, she claim that in her 10 year work, she had no failure to cure patients, or to make symptoms much better in bipolar disorder and psychotic disorders.
They (in that German clinic) give anti psychotics only to severely aggressive patients, just for one night, so patient could be able to listen to psychologist next morning... That sounds too surreal to me still... I can't imagine that approach here ever...
 
calypso

calypso

Well-known member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2011
Messages
40,561
Location
Lancashire
#7
Hey Apollon, what started in this country was peer group meetings, where people came together to discuss their experiences and gave each other suport and an informal therapy. Could this be an idea for you? xx
 
A

Apollon

Guest
#8
Hey Apollon, what started in this country was peer group meetings, where people came together to discuss their experiences and gave each other suport and an informal therapy. Could this be an idea for you? xx
Are you talking about "group therapy"?
It is organised in so called "trauma centers" and "safe homes"... Few people attend it.
I find it disturbing a lot, because I can't talk about my feelings openly even via internet, and in personal, with strangers - impossible...
But I think that can be of benefit for majority of people... I can't count myself in that majority because of my social to brain problems with autistic spectrum...
 
calypso

calypso

Well-known member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2011
Messages
40,561
Location
Lancashire
#9
No Apollon, I mean people with same disorders advertise and get together outside the system. We have lots over here and they share info and help they have found. In some cases they can even influence policy by challenging as a group what is done to them. Like you meet on this forum and share problems and aid.
 
A

Apollon

Guest
#10
I like your idea, and this forum. :) In Serbia, we have "Depresija forum", forum dedicated to depressive disorder, but it's not good as this forum, can't compare.
I always thought that British people are distant and cold, but reality proved opposite, there is much more compassion here, on this forum, then in Serbian forums...
Thank you calypso, and everyone for nice posts... :hug: