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BPD - how to get diagnosed

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silentlybrokenangel

Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2009
Messages
14
Location
England
Hey, I'm new here.

I'm just wondering how does one go about getting diagnosed with BPD or some other disorder. Do you just go to your GP?

See, I've recently started to wonder whether or not I could have BPD. I've noticed that I seem to slip between two different versions of myself.

One version is really giggly and girly, always laughing and seeming really nice and friendly, willing to help anyone. This version sees herself as nice, friendly, and approachable.

The other version is silent and secluded, constantly scowling and trying to ignore everyone, walking with a 'don't you even look at me' glare, and can't see much point in doing anything. This version sees herself as selfish, shallow, superficial, bitter, and twisted.

I was curious about this because my thought processes seem to completely change depending on which 'version' seems stronger. When I'm in one persona I'm optimistic and energetic. When I'm in the other one I just hate everyone and want to cut everyone out of my life. I kept wondering 'how can my thought processes change so drastically, and quite often so suddenly? I can slip into the second version in the blink of an eye, but slipping back to the first takes hours.

I was thinking about this when I posted it as a question somewhere and was told it could be BPD. I did some research and it certainly fits, and I have some of the classic 'symptoms' such as anxiety, self-harming, fluctuating personal relationships (such as admiring my best friend and the next hating her to death), sudden anger which I can barely control.

So I was just wondering what I would need to do to find out whether it is BPD, or if I'm just overreacting and worrying over nothing. I'm reluctant to go to my GP. I went once when I thought I was depressed, and all he did was give me antidepressants - didn't even ask me anything to confirm it. And when I last went about my self-harming, he just treated me like I was stupid, so I turned down the counselling he offerred.

Also, if it is BPD, what techniques can I use to, I dunno... merge the two identities?
 
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*Sapphire*

Guest
Are you talking about Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) or BiPolar (BP)?
 
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silentlybrokenangel

Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2009
Messages
14
Location
England
Borderline Personality Disorder.
 
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*Sapphire*

Guest
Ok, just thought i'd check!

I have BPD, I was diagnosed after I had developed a pattern of behaviors and symptoms. They question marked it when I was seventeen but was then formerly diagnosed when i was in my 20s when the pattern continued. This is the most common way to be diagnosed with BPD.

Unfortunately no one can diagnose you here, but the best thing to do is to see your GP. Even though he/she may not have been sympathetic you should experience a different response from a counsellor. if he/she refers you to one.
Elements of BPD can affect a great range of people, I think to a certain degree most people are on the spectrum, however it depends on how much it is harming or limiting your life. Mine was life threatening and damaging.

I think rather than go to your GP self diagnosing it is best to describe your experiences and see what he/she suggests.

I have had treatment for BPD called DBT. There is alot about it on the web. I think the techniques highlighted there are good for a variety of mental health issues, so may be of some help to you.
 
ms_P

ms_P

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2008
Messages
3,067
Location
BeNeLux
I got the dx BPD after first being called a "difficult patient".
I think this dx is given out too freely when the profs don't know what else to do with you. IMO.
 
Condottiere

Condottiere

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2009
Messages
18
Why should you have to seek a diagnosis? One gets diagnosed. Does it ? Even then, I would not recommend you saying anything about any personality disorder or anything, but instead just follow the path that your treatment will be given. You are not a professional, the person who mentioned it is neither, and websites will not be sufficient.

Besides, almost everybody could be diagnosed with BPD if one plays with the criterias.

I find your attitude useless, or even dangerous, to your overall situation.
 
S

*Sapphire*

Guest
I can actually see your point Condottiere.
My diagnosis felt like a life sentence to me, when they first mentioned it I burst into tears and fell into a deep depression. It was worse when one psyche told me I would be like this forever and nothing could change it or me. Also when I was in hospital and they discovered my diagnosis I was often neglected because there is a general lack of understanding and apathy from professionals dealing with persons with BPD. The only time it has been useful is when I got referred for DBT, however if I didn't have it would have I had needed DBT? Now I don't really meet the criteria for BPD anymore, so there is a question mark whether I still have it.

However if you feel you are suffering, some people do find comfort in having a diagnosis to understand and comprehend their issues, putting the pieces of the jigsaw together as it were.

I did say earlier and do agree with you that self diagnosing is rarely the way forward, but openly letting the GP know what your symptoms are, and see what they say.
 
Condottiere

Condottiere

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2009
Messages
18
I have no problem with seeing any professional because one feels bad and needs help : it is amongst the best things that can be done to get help and feel better, short or long term alike. I have a problem with doing the same thing only to know if some random tag could be applied to one's situation.

Besides, before getting diagnosed with any mental health trouble (or, actually, before being diagnosed with anything remotely serious), many other possibilities will be evaluated : only seeing BPD or no BPD as the only options will not help in any way. I do not know what this situation could mean, or could not, but then again, I haven't any formation in this area, merely some experience with psychiatry (or psychiatrist), and some Wikipedia readings.
 
Q

quality factor

Guest
This is where the use of the Internet for self-diagnosis can be a dangerous route to follow. One can sometimes talk oneself in to having the symptoms mentioned, thus formulating in your mind a mis -leading conclusion of diagnosis.

It is more sensible to seek help from a professional , it can be the local Community Mental Health Team or your GP.

If and when a diagnosis is reached, and this can sometimes take years, then I don't see any problem with researching your diagnosis, to gain insight and maybe practice some self-help techniques.

QF.
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
One version is really giggly and girly, always laughing and seeming really nice and friendly, willing to help anyone. This version sees herself as nice, friendly, and approachable.

The other version is silent and secluded, constantly scowling and trying to ignore everyone, walking with a 'don't you even look at me' glare, and can't see much point in doing anything. This version sees herself as selfish, shallow, superficial, bitter, and twisted.
Probably quite normal & describes the vast majority of people.
 
dib4uk

dib4uk

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
Messages
2,182
Location
south london,england
Having borderline personality is sometimes misslooked by health care professionals, and the only real way to know one way or another is to get a full diagnosis from the mental health provider.

I have no idea what is wrong with me, but i started out by going to the doctors saying i cant cope anymore and having bouts of crying. I was refered to the Priory and then they refered me to the south london and maudsley mental health provission... its a slow and painfull wait.

Good luck silentlybrokenangel - and remember that its quiet common to have bipola, unipola, anxiety as well as having Borderline personality disorder.

:welcome:
 
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