• Welcome! It’s great to see you. Our forum members are people, maybe like yourself, who experience mental health difficulties or who have had them at some point in their life.

    If you'd like to talk with people who know what it's like

Borderline Personality Disorder: New Perspectives on a Stigmatizing and Overused Diagnosis

F

firemonkee57

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Messages
8,224
Borderline Personality Disorder: New Perspectives on a Stigmatizing and Overused Diagnosis

In this post, Jacqueline Gunn and Brent Potter present their recent book Borderline Personality Disorder: New Perspectives on a Stigmatizing and Overused Diagnosis (Praeger Publishers Inc). Dr Gunn is a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice in New York, specializing in Eating Disorders, Trauma, Interpersonal Problems as well as a variety of other psychological disorders. Dr. Brent Potter is a psychotherapist and wellness specialist with 20 years of direct clinical service. He is the Director for the Society for Laingian Studies, based in Thousand Oaks, California.


Imperfect Cognitions: Borderline Personality Disorder: New Perspectives on a Stigmatizing and Overused Diagnosis
 
Toasted Crumpet

Toasted Crumpet

ACCOUNT CLOSED
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
8,424
Location
under the Forum Troll bridge
sounds interesting, I dunno if I am brave enough to read another book about BPD though, I have read so much crap it just sets me off on more self hate etc
 
SomersetScorpio

SomersetScorpio

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 17, 2012
Messages
13,531
Location
The West Country
‘Borderline’ is to psychiatry as psychiatry is to medicine. Psychiatry’s multiple functional failures—scientistic, misogynistic, literalistic, moralistic, personalistic, pathologizing, Eurocentric, etc.—have sparked interest in what actually works. Most people, these days, have had or know someone who has had a horrible, if not outrightly dehumanizing, experience with the mental health system. Upon this ground of failures, new approaches are emerging, such as the recovery movement. This thorough and unconventional book is part of this movement. We offer an alternative way of understanding so-called ‘borderline personality disorder,’ and with it shred the stigma, while offering a new sense of hope and possibility for those suffering.
Well, that sounds pretty interesting.
I've got my own opinions on the whole "recovery movement" thing, but still, it sounds like this is worth a read.
Oh and I certainly agree that BPD is stigmatising and overused.

Personally, I think that every couple of years a trendy diagnosis comes along - not trendy as in 'cool' but literally, there is a trend that sees psychiatrists diagnosing lots of people with it.
A few years back, it seemed everybody was bipolar and now it seems everybody is BPD.:(
 
E

earthbound_misfit

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2013
Messages
90
Personally, I think that every couple of years a trendy diagnosis comes along - not trendy as in 'cool' but literally, there is a trend that sees psychiatrists diagnosing lots of people with it.
A few years back, it seemed everybody was bipolar and now it seems everybody is BPD.:(
I was thinking about this earlier - or rather, I was wondering if BPD diagnoses would be skyrocketing. I was thinking about how services have been cut, whilst more people are trying to get help. In short, this means services have to find ways to send people away, and individual staff have to square their inability to help in their own heads. Viewing behaviours as attention seeking, manipulative, not 'taking responsibility' etc. is the easiest way to do this (Im sure a lot happens subconsciously). Also, as people can't get help their symptoms may worsen, quite possibly in a help-seeking, even 'acting out' way eg. repeatedly asking for help, expressing suicide ideation, getting cross with frustration when they can't get help (because they will not understand why the system won't help and assume it's cos the professionals don't realise how bad it is!)

In addition, the increase in referrals to secondary services has been blamed on the recession and subsequent job losses and benefit cuts. Which means a lot of the extra demand will be people with situational depression, or perhaps more likely, people with difficulty coping who have been pushed over the edge by financial/occupational circumstances. Poor coping with life events - BPD (mis)diagnosis!

Also perhaps the people now seeking help are of the touchy-feely, politically correct type generation, growing up influenced by teachers and others who had studenty, socialist ideas (coming to the end of that now, perhaps...). On top of that, there's this myth that if you work hard in school, go to uni etc. you'll automatically have a fulfilling career, as well as an individualistic tendency. So encountering the blunt, relatively un-psychologically minded mental health system, which 'clusters' people and has no time for individuality, is a bit of a shock! Which I'd guess would result in difficulties with professionals due to daring to complain or speak out, and generally an attitude that would be labelled 'non-compliance' whilst still the person is crying out for help! - all adds up to a BPD diagnosis!

Perhaps that's just my theory of my experiences, haha. Oops another accidental mini-essay! :clap:

EM
 
SomersetScorpio

SomersetScorpio

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 17, 2012
Messages
13,531
Location
The West Country
It's a good mini-essay and I agree with what you're saying.

I saw a new(ish) doctor recently. We talked about my diagnosis and me saying I no longer believe I fit the bill for BPD.
She pretty much agreed, then gave me information to take away on all types of personality disorders.
She then suggested that I put a tick by each symptom I identify with, and that maybe it'll turn out i'd fit in with a more anxious personality disorder.
I felt like asking why I had to have a diagnosis of any personality disorder... :confused:

I do think it's a convenient way to turn people away from the services and a good excuse not to offer any real support.
 
Top