Biology versus story - Family lineage risk

J

johnram

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2018
Messages
239
#1
Hi all,

i am trying to get a sense of schizophrenia from a lineage point of view. My mother is on Depixol (Flupentixol), and has been for a long time as she is Schizophrenic.

I am trying to gauge my own risk factor to it, and from speaking to my therapist (I have complex PTSD - including depression, addictions), trying to establish if my mothers circumstances gave rise to her Schizophrenia or its biological, or assuming maybe both.

Context - my mother moved overseas to marry my father (arranged marriage), had never left her country, and was not overly wanted / welcomed as time progressed, however she stuck with it, had me, had post natal depression and then later has schizophrenia (and through my youth was hospitalized a few times). Now until this point, she had not had any known issues i understand (my family is ruptured, so i cant ask these questions). Also i understand her own family has not had any mental health issues, and are fairly robust people.

I think its something i wont get an answer for directly, but wanted to put it out there to hear others views for my own understanding.

thank you kindly
 
J

johnram

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2018
Messages
239
#3
There is some relation with migrants and schizophrenia.. I guess it mattered a lot.
thank you for posting, can you clarify what you mean

assume you mean the process of moving country can be mentally straining to the point of schizophrenia?
 
L

linus

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Mar 27, 2019
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333
Location
Eastern Europe
#4
Yes, when I was looking for various statistics to explain what could be the cause of my son’s psychosis I found a guideline from Australia that covers this part (migrants) and they found this relation.
 
boudreauj4

boudreauj4

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Joined
Jan 6, 2017
Messages
800
#7
I read that the chances of getting schizophrenia in the general population is about 0.5 to 1 percent. If one of your parents or one brother or sister has schizophrenia, your chances of getting it go up to 10 percent. If both of your parents have it your risk is 40 percent. And if you have an identical twin who has it your risk is 50 percent.

So there is a genetic quality to schizophrenia. The closer you are related to a person with schizophrenia, or the closer your DNA matches a person with schizophrenia, the higher your chances are of getting it. But you have to look at it the other way too. Since identical twins supposedly have the same DNA and both twins get schizophrenia only half the time, then there must be other reasons other than genetics why people get or don't get schizophrenia. I believe the medical world thinks there are also physical, environmental, and psychological reasons that contribute to a person's odds of getting schizophrenia. There have been researched other reasons that might contribute, like living in cities, the mother being malnourished or getting a virus while pregnant with the person that eventually gets schizophrenia, stress, or the father being an older age. There are more which I can't remember right now.