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bdd

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lilslugger

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I have bdd. In a class there is this girl i really like and someday i would like to be her boyfriend. I think i should try being her friend first as she is very shy. How do you talk to a girl that is so quiet. I've never had a girlfriend because of my looks and i know i'm only setting myself up for failure. I need to feel better about my image or I'll be alone for the rest of my life. Any advice?
 
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schizolanza

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Body dysmorphic disorder
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Jump to: navigation, search
Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 F45.2
ICD-9 300.7
DiseasesDB 33723
eMedicine med/3124
Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) (previously known as Dysmorphophobia[1] and sometimes referred to as Body dysmorphia) (also known as "Dysmorphic syndrome," and "Dysmorphophobia"[2]) is a psychiatric disorder in which the affected person is excessively concerned about and preoccupied by an imagined or minor defect in his or her physical features. The sufferer may complain of several specific features or a single feature, or a vague feature or general appearance, causing psychological distress that impairs occupational and/or social functioning, sometimes to the point of complete social isolation.[3] It is estimated that 1–2% of the world's population meet all the diagnostic criteria for BDD.

Individuals with very obvious and immediately-noticeable defects should not be diagnosed with BDD, however culture and clinician bias may play a significant part in the subjectivity behind determining what physical appearance is considered 'normal' and in whom the disorder is diagnosed.[4] BDD combines obsessive and compulsive aspects, linking it, among psychologists, to the obsessive–compulsive spectrum disorders. The exact cause or causes of BDD is unknown, but most clinicians believe it to be a complex combination of biological, psychological and sociological factors.

Onset of symptoms generally occurs in adolescence or early adulthood, although cases of BDD onset in children and older adults is not unknown. BDD is often misunderstood to affect mostly women, however research shows that it affects men and women equally. The disorder is linked to significantly diminished quality of life and co-morbid major depressive disorder and social phobia. With a completed-suicide rate more than double than that of major depression, and a suicidal ideation rate of around 80%, BDD is considered a major risk factor for suicide. A person with the disorder may be treated with psychotherapy, medication, or both. Research has shown cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to be effective in treating BDD. BDD is a chronic illness and symptoms are likely to persist, or worsen, if left untreated.
 
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ms_P

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I have bdd. In a class there is this girl i really like and someday i would like to be her boyfriend. I think i should try being her friend first as she is very shy. How do you talk to a girl that is so quiet. I've never had a girlfriend because of my looks and i know i'm only setting myself up for failure. I need to feel better about my image or I'll be alone for the rest of my life. Any advice?
Hi Lilslugger,
You say you have a class together. Why don't you start a conversation after class about something you're learning? That should be an easy ice-breaker. The best advice is to be yourself.
I wouldn't think about the future too much, because we don't know what it will bring. One step at a time.
Good luck. :flowers:
 
ms_P

ms_P

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Founding Member
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Body Dysmorphic Disorder I think.
Body dysmorphic disorder
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 F45.2
ICD-9 300.7
DiseasesDB 33723
eMedicine med/3124
Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) (previously known as Dysmorphophobia[1] and sometimes referred to as Body dysmorphia) (also known as "Dysmorphic syndrome," and "Dysmorphophobia"[2]) is a psychiatric disorder in which the affected person is excessively concerned about and preoccupied by an imagined or minor defect in his or her physical features. The sufferer may complain of several specific features or a single feature, or a vague feature or general appearance, causing psychological distress that impairs occupational and/or social functioning, sometimes to the point of complete social isolation.[3] It is estimated that 1–2% of the world's population meet all the diagnostic criteria for BDD.

Individuals with very obvious and immediately-noticeable defects should not be diagnosed with BDD, however culture and clinician bias may play a significant part in the subjectivity behind determining what physical appearance is considered 'normal' and in whom the disorder is diagnosed.[4] BDD combines obsessive and compulsive aspects, linking it, among psychologists, to the obsessive–compulsive spectrum disorders. The exact cause or causes of BDD is unknown, but most clinicians believe it to be a complex combination of biological, psychological and sociological factors.

Onset of symptoms generally occurs in adolescence or early adulthood, although cases of BDD onset in children and older adults is not unknown. BDD is often misunderstood to affect mostly women, however research shows that it affects men and women equally. The disorder is linked to significantly diminished quality of life and co-morbid major depressive disorder and social phobia. With a completed-suicide rate more than double than that of major depression, and a suicidal ideation rate of around 80%, BDD is considered a major risk factor for suicide. A person with the disorder may be treated with psychotherapy, medication, or both. Research has shown cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to be effective in treating BDD. BDD is a chronic illness and symptoms are likely to persist, or worsen, if left untreated.
Thank you both for the explanations. :flowers:
 
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