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Attachment Disorder Vs PDs/Borderline

A

Ainsworth

Guest
Ive spent the morning having a very interesting chat with someone about emotional attachment and its lead me to think..... is attachment disorder just another way of saying someone is borderline or is on the spectrum for PD (?)

emotional attachment is never usually sexual in anyway because the feelings tend to be deeper or more on the comfort side and how the person makes us feel but at the same time are very intense and overwhelming. On the flip side they can also be destructive.

I have had both said to me by P-docs, leading to no dx on either but how do we get the point of being able to seperate the two disorders? (are they seperate?)

In the past children who were adopted were classed or dx with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) but how much do they signs of RAD merge into PD especially Borderline? is it because they are children they get dx with attachment disorder and not PD/borderline?

I suppose in a way im just thinking out loud, but am interested in what others think about it.
 
M

mad as a hatter

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what if it,s not ne type of disorder and we r just bein normal human beings what,s wrong with having feelings for people and it,s not always about sex they just mk u smile or happy it,s always the one,s u can never have either does that mean i,ve got a pd cause off it i don,t think so
 
A

Ainsworth

Guest
what if it,s not ne type of disorder and we r just bein normal human beings what,s wrong with having feelings for people and it,s not always about sex they just mk u smile or happy it,s always the one,s u can never have either does that mean i,ve got a pd cause off it i don,t think so
hmm i think it depends on the reaction or behaviour we express in these types of situations which (may/could) set us apart from others.

i know as a child i didnt understand what love was, its taken me to this point to know if im emotionally attached to someone and yes i could use the word love but its not 'inlove'...yet i know its not sexual.

i remember as a child being completely confused with sexuality because the attachment could be towards females as well (though am straight) so remember staying away from most people male and female, so probably confused attachment with being inlove.

hmm im going to end up with even more questions at this rate on this subject :LOL:
 
A

Ainsworth

Guest
this bit is interesting

thanks for the link, taken this bit from it

Common signs and symptoms of reactive attachment disorder

* An aversion to touch and physical affection. Children with reactive attachment disorder often flinch, laugh, or even say “Ouch” when touched. Rather than producing positive feelings, touch and affection are perceived as a threat.
* Control issues. Most children with reactive attachment disorder go to great lengths to prevent feeling helpless and remain in control. They are often disobedient, defiant, and argumentative.
* Anger problems. Anger may be expressed directly, in tantrums or acting out, or through manipulative, passive-aggressive behavior. Children with reactive attachment disorder may hide their anger in socially acceptable actions, like giving a high five that hurts or hugging someone too hard.
* Difficulty showing genuine care and affection. For example, children with reactive attachment disorder may act inappropriately affectionate with strangers while displaying little or no affection towards their parents.
* An underdeveloped conscience. Children with reactive attachment disorder may act like they don’t have a conscience and fail to show guilt, regret, or remorse after behaving badly.

Inhibited reactive attachment disorder vs. disinhibited reactive attachment disorder

As children with reactive attachment disorder grow older, they often develop either an inhibited or a disinhibited pattern of symptoms:

* Inhibited symptoms of reactive attachment disorder. The child is extremely withdrawn, emotionally detached, and resistant to comforting. The child is aware of what’s going on around him or her—hypervigilant even—but doesn’t react or respond. He or she may push others away, ignore them, or even act out in aggression when others try to get close.
* Disinhibited symptoms of reactive attachment disorder. The child doesn’t seem to prefer his or her parents over other people, even strangers. The child seeks comfort and attention from virtually anyone, without distinction. He or she is extremely dependent, acts much younger than his or her age, and may appear chronically anxious.
 
A

Ainsworth

Guest
hmm

http://counsellingresource.com/ask-...ty-disorder-and-reactive-attachment-disorder/

Q:

As my therapist and I have discussed my husband’s behavior because of its effect on me, she has hazarded a guess that he is dealing with reactive attachment disorder. The things I’ve noticed about him seem to indicate he’s got borderline PD tendencies. (He himself agrees to this.) I did some searching to find information about reactive attachment disorder, but all the information seems focused on children, not adults. My question is this: What happens to a child with reactive attachment disorder when he grows up, especially if the problem goes unrecognized and untreated? Do you call it reactive attachment for an adult, or does it get a new name, such as borderline? How much do these conditions overlap? It seems to me that there is a fair deal of similarity, but the focus on children with RAD makes it hard to tell. Thanks.

Our Clinical Psychologist’s Reply
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By Dr Joseph M Carver, PhD | 26 February 2008
A:

Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) is considered a disorder of childhood and many of the criteria for the disorder begin before the age of five years. I would consider a diagnosis of RAD in an adult to be inappropriate. However, many professionals believe, as you suspect, that RAD often serves as a starting-point or precursor for the development of a personality disorder in adulthood. In this theory, RAD-Inhibited Type (severe social impairment) is seen as the precursor for Schizoid Personality Disorder, while RAD-Uninhibited Type (inappropriate social attachments and behavior) may be a foundation for Histrionic Personality Disorder and Borderline Personality Disorder.

From a practical standpoint, I wouldn’t focus on RAD except as a possible starting-point for your husband’s difficulties. I’d concentrate on the current personality-disorder symptoms, especially if he has borderline traits. You’ll need a concentration on his current behavior and symptoms, not his childhood. When your house is flooding and you’re trying to survive, it’s ineffective to think about the dam that broke 100 miles upstream.
 
A

Ainsworth

Guest
but attachment disorder is an 'adult' disorder too

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attachment_in_adults

Attachment styles

Adults have four attachment styles: secure, anxious-preoccupied, dismissive avoidant, and fearful avoidant. The secure attachment style in adults corresponds to the secure attachment style in children. The anxious-preoccupied attachment style in adults corresponds to the anxious/ambivalent attachment style in children. However, the dismissive avoidant attachment style and the fearful avoidant attachment style, which are distinct in adults, correspond to a single avoidant attachment style in children. The descriptions of adult attachment styles offered below are based on the relationship questionnaire devised by Bartholomew and Horowitz[6] and on a review of studies by Pietromonaco and Barrett.[7]

There are several attachment-based treatment approaches that can be used with adults.[8] In addition, there is an approach to treating couples based on attachment theory.[9]
[edit]

Secure attachment

Securely attached people tend to agree with the following statements: "It is relatively easy for me to become emotionally close to others. I am comfortable depending on others and having others depend on me. I don't worry about being alone or having others not accept me." This style of attachment usually results from a history of warm and responsive interactions with relationship partners. Securely attached people tend to have positive views of themselves and their partners. They also tend to have positive views of their relationships. Often they report greater satisfaction and adjustment in their relationships than people with other attachment styles. Securely attached people feel comfortable both with intimacy and with independence. Many seek to balance intimacy and independence in their relationships.
[edit]

Insecure attachment
[edit] Anxious-preoccupied attachment

People who are anxious or preoccupied with attachment tend to agree with the following statements: "I want to be completely emotionally intimate with others, but I often find that others are reluctant to get as close as I would like. I am uncomfortable being without close relationships, but I sometimes worry that others don't value me as much as I value them." People with this style of attachment seek high levels of intimacy, approval, and responsiveness from their partners. They sometimes value intimacy to such an extent that they become overly dependent on their partners—a condition colloquially termed clinginess. Compared to securely attached people, people who are anxious or preoccupied with attachment tend to have less positive views about themselves. They often doubt their worth as a partner and blame themselves for their partners' lack of responsiveness. People who are anxious or preoccupied with attachment may exhibit high levels of emotional expressiveness, worry, and impulsiveness in their relationships.
[edit]

Dismissive-avoidant attachment

People with a dismissive style of avoidant attachment tend to agree with these statements: "I am comfortable without close emotional relationships. It is very important to me to feel independent and self-sufficient, and I prefer not to depend on others or have others depend on me." People with this attachment style desire a high level of independence. The desire for independence often appears as an attempt to avoid attachment altogether. They view themselves as self-sufficient and invulnerable to feelings associated with being closely attached to others. They often deny needing close relationships. Some may even view close relationships as relatively unimportant. Not surprisingly, they seek less intimacy with relationship partners, whom they often view less positively than they view themselves. Investigators commonly note the defensive character of this attachment style. People with a dismissive-avoidant attachment tend to suppress and hide their feelings, and they tend to deal with rejection by distancing themselves from the sources of rejection (i.e., their relationship partners).
[edit]

Fearful-avoidant attachment

People with a fearful style of avoidant attachment tend to agree with the following statements: "I am somewhat uncomfortable getting close to others. I want emotionally close relationships, but I find it difficult to trust others completely, or to depend on them. I sometimes worry that I will be hurt if I allow myself to become too close to others." People with this attachment style have mixed feelings about close relationships. On the one hand, they desire to have emotionally close relationships. On the other hand, they tend to feel uncomfortable with emotional closeness. These mixed feelings are combined with negative views about themselves and their partners. They commonly view themselves as unworthy of responsiveness from their partners, and they don't trust the intentions of their partners. Similarly to the dismissive-avoidant attachment style, people with a fearful-avoidant attachment style seek less intimacy from partners and frequently suppress and hide their feelings.
 
dib4uk

dib4uk

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Hey guys thanks for the links, it was extremely useful i do associate myself with one of them i think... good reading.!!
 
A

Ainsworth

Guest
well i found it, after some searching.

yesterday i had my label of borderline PD taken away and given attachment disorder.

i now have to start re-reading this. some of it doesnt make sense to what i was like when i was young, i was a passive child and had no behavioural problems or acting out in anger. in fact my mum told me i wasnt an angry child until 13/14 and i was very nice. i didnt make attachments to anyone between the ages of 4 (the age i can recall) and 12. (?)
 
maxitab

maxitab

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I refer to you question in your original post.......which makes the point about the uselessness of labels.

I think this is another description for the same thing. But hold on to your hat. A psychotherapist I know is on the consulting board for the new DSM classifications and - all of the PD's are being re classified as we speak. In three months it could change again!


I think if anything I would say that any PD is a condition based on attachment disorder or issues.
 
A

Ainsworth

Guest
thats interesting about the change to PD, i look forward to seeing that.

im just getting to the point of nothing makes sense, nothing is sense, so im fine lol

my hubby said last night that if he could change anything about any of my behaviours/illness he would just remove the depression. the rest is just a juggling game.
 
deedle141

deedle141

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Hi, not really sure technically the answer to your question, but I have BPD and dependant personality disorder, but before these got diagnosed my family and I thought I had attachment disorder... if that's helpful...
 
Girl Interrupted

Girl Interrupted

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I refer to you question in your original post.......which makes the point about the uselessness of labels.

I think this is another description for the same thing. But hold on to your hat. A psychotherapist I know is on the consulting board for the new DSM classifications and - all of the PD's are being re classified as we speak. In three months it could change again!

I think if anything I would say that any PD is a condition based on attachment disorder or issues.


Dr John Oldham on DSM board says BPD is not being reclassified as a mood disorder and will remain a PD as it is a serious mental illness, albeit that is how it is viewed in America. Sadly (and I have had many a debate with registrar's here) we use the ICD-10. I have however noted that a clinician or mh professional will utilise either depending on their political aim at that given time.

Getting back to the original post, some BPD's have endured disrupted attachements throughout out their lives with significant people, but that does not mean they had an attachment disorder as a child, or even do have one now as an adult. Maxitab is correct BPD is created by attachment issues in early childhood.

I would errr on caution reading all that stuff as one can attribute any manner of spurious symptoms/behaviours to one's self. Self diagnosis is a dangeorus sport.
 
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