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Aspergers/autism test

monopod

monopod

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I've often wondered if I would be diagnosed with Aspergers. I took the following test and got 37, which suggests autism is likely. It seems to me that a lot of the questions would get positive responses from someone with social anxiety though. I'd be interested to see how other people score.

Autism / Asperger's Quiz

NB. This thread was inspired by this other one.
 
SomersetScorpio

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28 - No autism according to the test.

I think with all of these tests though, that most people have at least a few traits of all kinds of psychological disorders.
 
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lovagemuffin

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I got 30 strange you should post this cause my neice just got diagnosed with mild autism and the characteristic shes displaying is a mirror image of how I was as a child.
I don't think having it changes a person that much the only good thing I could see is the school she goes to will be aware of her learning needs.
 
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lovagemuffin

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I got 30 strange you should post this cause my neice just got diagnosed with mild autism and the characteristic shes displaying is a mirror image of how I was as a child.
I don't think having it changes a person that much the only good thing I could see is the school she goes to will be aware of her learning needs.
 
Mayfair

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I've done this test (or similar) a number of times over some years. Almost always in the mid 30s, but 39 on this one.

Some of the wording/choices though I find to be ambiguous.

This one for example: I find social situations easy. It is far too vague.

I think you would only be diagnosed as such if you were in situations that caused you (or someone else) to bring it to the attention of someone in this field, if you/ or they thought that it was causing a quite severe negative impact in one's life.

Obviously other things would have to be discounted too, as many people fall into the 'high' category who have no other more obvious signs of it. In other words, scoring highly in it doesn't necessarily mean you are Autistic, but if you are Autistic you are likely to score highly in it.
 
Passionflower

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I always get high scores on autism tests but I think it has more to do with my schizophrenia symptoms as I don't think I would be diagnosed with autism otherwise.
 
monopod

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Obviously other things would have to be discounted too, as many people fall into the 'high' category who have no other more obvious signs of it. In other words, scoring highly in it doesn't necessarily mean you are Autistic, but if you are Autistic you are likely to score highly in it.
Yeah, it's always sensible to take these tests with a pinch of salt, but a well devised test should minimise false positives.
 
Mayfair

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Yeah, it's always sensible to take these tests with a pinch of salt, but a well devised test should minimise false positives.
Yes, I think it's one of the better types of 'tests' that I've seen compiled for other things/conditions/whatever one calls them. I've not seen the scoring algorithms of this one, but I think there are several key questions that are quite specific, and they perhaps make up more of the score. I think Baron-Cohen wrote this one/similar, and I quite like/respect the bloke from what I've seen of him.

The only other type of 'test' that I like is Myers-Briggs. Might have to dig that old thread up :)
 
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I scored 14... no surprise to me - autism is one of the few things I haven't been suspected of at some point.

I think with all of these tests though, that most people have at least a few traits of all kinds of psychological disorders.
From what I can gather, everyone is on the autistic spectrum to some degree. I once had a friend claim she'd seen somewhere that all men have mild autism =/

Some of the wording/choices though I find to be ambiguous.

This one for example: I find social situations easy. It is far too vague.
I completely agree, and I think this is a major problem with the whole questionnaire methodology. The term 'social situations' encompasses a heck of a lot of very different scenarios... personally speaking, I can think of social contexts in which I'm very comfortable, and even quite extroverted (e.g. playing football, where I'm usually one of the more vocal players), but then there are others in which I'm more hapless than literally anyone I've ever known (I used to have panic attacks on dates, and these days even thinking about going on a date terrifies me in a way which has a physiological effect), so how do you accurately average all of that out and reduce it to a single score on a four point scale?

The only other type of 'test' that I like is Myers-Briggs. Might have to dig that old thread up :)
Yeah, I like the Myers-Briggs test... I'm either an INFP or an ENFP depending on the individual questionnaire, which I think is an accurate reflection of how I'm difficult to pigeonhole as either introverted or extroverted.

I also find the so-called 'Big Five' personality traits to be an interesting measure... this scores people on their levels of Openness (to new experiences... open-mindedness would probably be a better, albeit less concise, title), Conscientiousness (this relates to self-discipline and organisation), Extroversion, Agreeableness (how well we relate to others), and Neuroticism (emotional stability and vulnerability). I've done a few big-five tests, and tend to score highly for Openness, low-average for Conscientiousness, average for Extroversion, average for Agreeableness, and very high for Neuroticism.
 
Darkred

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I have Aspergers and went through numerous tests that the professionals actually use to give a diagnosis. I can tell you those silly questions won't be asked. So I hope no one takes it seriously
 
Mayfair

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I scored 14... no surprise to me - autism is one of the few things I haven't been suspected of at some point.
14? I'll try it again and see how that is done :)

If I answer the exact opposite of what I think, I can see how the scale works :D (and perhaps see if you are the opposite to me :D

From what I can gather, everyone is on the autistic spectrum to some degree.
I've heard this too, but it doesn't make much sense unless I know exactly how it is scaled. For example, what is the opposite of 'high' Autism ratings? (as I joked about us, in the last bit above)

I once had a friend claim she'd seen somewhere that all men have mild autism =/
This kind of conflicts with the above though doesn't it? If what we've heard is true, then this scale is done differently to others. (meaning the bold and how averages work in most scales)

I completely agree, and I think this is a major problem with the whole questionnaire methodology. The term 'social situations' encompasses a heck of a lot of very different scenarios... personally speaking, I can think of social contexts in which I'm very comfortable, and even quite extroverted (e.g. playing football, where I'm usually one of the more vocal players), but then there are others in which I'm more hapless than literally anyone I've ever known (I used to have panic attacks on dates, and these days even thinking about going on a date terrifies me in a way which has a physiological effect), so how do you accurately average all of that out and reduce it to a single score on a four point scale?
Bold: absolutely. That's why I can't answer it on those things.

I think in modern terms it means: Agree/Disagree 'you go out on the piss with your mates/colleagues after work/party on friday and think fuck it and ya have a reight laugh!!:drunk:'

Yeah, I like the Myers-Briggs test... I'm either an INFP or an ENFP depending on the individual questionnaire, which I think is an accurate reflection of how I'm difficult to pigeonhole as either introverted or extroverted.
ha, I switch between the E and I too, the question is similar to this one in most cases. It's quite a complex question though, so not easy to quantify. The only thing in this scale that is always high percentage for me, is your third letter, to which I'm normally 90%+ T :LOL:

I also find the so-called 'Big Five' personality traits to be an interesting measure... this scores people on their levels of Openness (to new experiences... open-mindedness would probably be a better, albeit less concise, title), Conscientiousness (this relates to self-discipline and organisation), Extroversion, Agreeableness (how well we relate to others), and Neuroticism (emotional stability and vulnerability). I've done a few big-five tests, and tend to score highly for Openness, low-average for Conscientiousness, average for Extroversion, average for Agreeableness, and very high for Neuroticism.
I read some stuff on that and in particular Cattell. I think sneaked into one, or the other or perhaps both. It would be difficult to do, but it would be interesting to see a partnership of these two. They both have good and bad points.
 
Darkred

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The tests I did in hospital hardly related around anxiety at all. You had to do timed puzzles, memory tests, this thing where they test how much tiny detail you can notice.. There were tests where you had to look at peoples faces and say their expression then another where all you got were their eyes and had to say what expression you think the eyes portrayed. The WAIS was used to.
 
Mayfair

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I have Aspergers and went through numerous tests that the professionals actually use to give a diagnosis. I can tell you those silly questions won't be asked. So I hope no one takes it seriously
Sorry red, I hope my post doesn't seem I am joking about this topic.

-

I think most of these type things are generally quite ridiculous. However, on the scale of questionnaires for consistency, Baron-Cohen and Mbriggs are consistent (for me).

Like I said, it doesn't suggest people are Autistic, it is showing what Autistic people score highly on in large numbers. That how I see it anyway.

Incidentally, as nonsense as it is, have you done it this one out of curiosity, and if so, what did you score?
 
Mayfair

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sorry, cross posted again!

The tests I did in hospital hardly related around anxiety at all. You had to do timed puzzles, memory tests, this thing where they test how much tiny detail you can notice.. There were tests where you had to look at peoples faces and say their expression then another where all you got were their eyes and had to say what expression you think the eyes portrayed. The WAIS was used to.
All nonsense tests really aren't they?

If these are the tests, then they are as nonsense as this questionnaire really.

What can some random test tell us about our memory?

/puzzles!
 
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