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Are you ready to do regular work?

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natalie

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HI Kerome,

I'm so glad that you have seriously taken the plunge to reconsider, and to re evaluate the demanding roles of the serires of interviews you were undertaking.


It does make sense that certainly for the time being, to look out for as you suggest, for something more simpler, or better still how about volunteering, that way, and if i may quote the expression already used elsewhere on this site, you get to test the water, before jumping in at the deep end.


I wish you well, to look for something more simpler.
 
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Coast2

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You know, after thinking about it for a few days I’ve reconsidered. I’ve basically said to them I withdraw my application for the management level position - it is too much learning, too much responsibility too quickly, too much stress. I’m going to look for something simpler.
I'm glad you've carefully considered all your options thoroughly Kerome. I'm sure this is the best decision for you and I hope that you find something else very soon. It does sound like you're ready to go back to work.

All the best
 
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ramboghettouk

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i've worked and studied whilst on meds, you don't realise it's a problem until you try the tiredness the sleeping long hours when put under stress and then having to make the hours for work

and in employment you have to turn up regularly or lose wages, you can't work irregular hours due to illness
 
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Coast2

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i've worked and studied whilst on meds, you don't realise it's a problem until you try the tiredness the sleeping long hours when put under stress and then having to make the hours for work

and in employment you have to turn up regularly or lose wages, you can't work irregular hours due to illness
I went back to work on a 'bank' contract within the NHS. If I did feel really ropey in the early days, I could just ring in and say I had something else on, although upon saying that I only did it a couple of times. But I started back doing three days a week. I was exhausted after I did my three days and would often sleep prett much for the remaining four. But bit by bit I've gained strength, got my self confidence back and now I'm ready to commit to a full time position.

But when I first went back to work there's no way I could have worked full time, I wasn't well enough. I've been very lucky to make a phased return and to do it at my pace.

Things are going very well for me now. I do still have bad days, and nights where I only get a couple of hours sleep, but they are few and far between now.
 
EddieH

EddieH

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Really admire you guys getting back to work on antipsychotics. I had a lot of trouble personally crashing tractors and many general stuff ups, even sent home for drooling at one point. The medication's better now and maybe I could get back to some work but I'm close to getting a government pension, so it's a bit of a can of worms. I'm so bored and really miss having a purpose and workmates. Good luck everyone.
 
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ramboghettouk

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saw something about them doing away with the disability premium in the guardian with the change to universal credit which is the same amount for everyone, though disability benefits will still exist

asked this mind employment women about work, she didn't want to know referred me to EACH a place below were when i asked they do basic numeracy, literacy and computing courses, think if i'm posting here i'm above that

spoke to the mind guy about voluntary work, he said are you really ready for that, as far as i can see if i was i'd be on benefit levels i couldn't cope on

don't know what to think, deeply worried about benefits and though i'd like to work, in this less than ideal world problems. for a start the no of times in social housing i've had the neighbour from hell keeping me up too 6 in the morning, taking drugs and plating loud music, how would i cope with working in that situation, as it is fitness for work is highly suspect, put pressure on me it's impossible
 
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Yoghurt and nuts

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Good luck with getting back to work. I started back at work last year, but only half time. I have flexible hours, and have been able to do more recently after looking after my nutrition better and having been tapering meds for a long time.
 
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ramboghettouk

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my boss said it's all very well employing disabled people but you've got to give them the support

severe mental illness you need support, theres the tiredness due to powerful drugs, the cognitive effects, the difficulties getting on with people, work is social usually
 
Kerome

Kerome

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I had another interview... the whole thing felt to me a bit toxic, people not so much focussed on happiness as on the burdens they had to carry.

It left me feeling a it depressed. Maybe I’m now too sensitive to work in a normal place.
 
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natalie

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Sorry to hear what you suffered at your interview Kerome.


Maybe just stick to what you are normally doing already, or how about trying out volunteering, or to do part time study coures.
 
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natalie

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I hadn't realised that this point came up, yes i agree, that meds definitely do make one tired, and i prefer now, and i am resuming volunteering, to take my dose early evening, and to keep better well, for the evenings, and also for the daytime, and more alert, after a good nights sleep hopefully and feel refreshed, a day after.


I am on 25ml, which I won't reduce, and I go tired, very very easily, withouit much caffine, intake, and tired quick. So i like to stick, with what I know, volunteering, and these days, I offer longer stints. on a day of volunteering. 25ml, is far and I swear by the best dose for me.
 
naominash

naominash

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At the point where I care little whether I work or not.

I want to be a mom one day and stay home with my baby or babies.

Chasing money can only make you so happy. I will keep my education goals and maybe work full time for a season. But Im really starting to see myself as being a homemaker for a while.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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I agree with you naominash that money only makes so much difference, but one does have to look at the practical side. It’s important to have enough. Here there is no such thing as disability benefits for mental health, only the social assistance benefit for when you’ve been unable to find work and have run out of your money.

For me it’s a difficult situation. If I don’t find work then I’ll eventually run out and be on a minimal support, maybe have to spend some time homeless or with family while I wait for social housing.

Better to go find work that I enjoy while I have control of my situation, I thought. But returning to work is not proving easy.
 
naominash

naominash

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I feel like you'd be good at teaching or tutoring. The wisdom and patience you have may help you there.

Over where I am, there are job agencies specifically for people with mental health issues.

But if you can find a temporary work agency that's good, that might help.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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Here we have a government service called IPS which finds you work when you’re ready to work again. They offer employers certain incentives to take you on, so it can all be done above board and you don’t have to hide that you’ve been ill. It’s part of the care-in-the-community team. Unfortunately I don’t qualify for it at the moment due to where I live, it’s funded by local government.
 
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