Are you ready to do regular work?

Kerome

Kerome

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
12,749
Location
Europe
#1
Here’s a question for you all: how do you know whether you are ready to go back to work, and whether you are able to do a certain job? I’m finding it difficult to answer this one.

Currently I’m doing a series of job interviews, and its for quite a demanding job, involving difficult technical questions, some performance pressure, responsibility for the work of others. So I’m finding it difficult to assess whether I’m ready to take it on, and I realise it’s the kind of job that would be challenging for a fully healthy person.

I’ve tried to do some tests and assessments, and they show that as a logical thinker I’m still quite sharp, and I have a lot of experience. But also that my ability to concentrate for sustained periods of time is not there yet - this could be rust or medication effects - and that my memory is not as sharp as I would like it to be.

It’s quite a serious question because if you do it and you break down due to stress or another episode, you may well end up being worse off than you were before.

So it’s a quandary... how would you approach something like this? How have you in the past made a choice for what kind of job to go for?
 
Last edited:
Not_Crazy_Yet

Not_Crazy_Yet

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 19, 2015
Messages
3,486
Location
USA
#2
That's a hard one bro. When I was on haldol I lost a job because I wasn't able to function properly. But that was just a job at Mcdonalds flipping burger's so no big loss. This spring I took on a job washing dishes in a small café. I found I was able to do that job because I was left to my own devices and not micromanaged. I positively LOATHE micromanagement. In fact during my time at mickey D's I had a meltdown on a supervisor. I had been working there for a month or more and she decided that she would re teach me how to flip burgers. She made me serve up burger patties that not only were still bloody but still raw on the outside. I basically gave her the finger and kept on cooking them fully. She never had another word for me as I told her I didn't need her F****** job. As most bosses do she felt she held some sort of power over me, and didn't know what to do when faced with someone who literally had nothing to lose. Sorry for rambling. The ball is in your court but I wouldn't sacrifice my MH just for a job. After all if you find it too challenging you may leave their employ worse off.

You're a smart guy and very wise. I trust you'll make a decision that is the most beneficial for you.
 
C

Coast2

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
1,235
Location
UK
#3
Hi Kerome,

As you probably know I returned to work at the beginning of the year and was presented with the same problem. In all honesty, I was still very unwell. I was only sleeping for two hours a night, if that, and as I was very heavily medicated I felt doped up and very slow.
My concentration was poor as was my short term memory.

In my previous job I worked as a PA for a regional manager and had to be able to juggle several balls In the air at the same time. I needed to be sharp. I knew I couldn't return to this kind of role immediately so I took a junior PA position at my local hospital on a part-time basis.

I did the right thing. I really struggled when I first returned to work. My concentration was poor, I couldn't remember things and I just felt zoned out. However, as the weeks and months went by my cognitive functions began to improve and the work got easier.

As a result of returning to work my mental health has improved. I needed to get into a routine and work provided this. Consequently I stopped napping in the day and I established a sensible routine again. Work provided social opportunities as well as i had become quite isolated and introverted.

I couldn't have returned to work in a job at my previous level, but I knew i was able to do some sort of work.

I guess it comes down to how you feel. Are you sleeping ok? What are your energy levels like during the day? It sounds like your cognitive functions have recovered enough to return to work, but it does sound like your confidence has taken a knock. It's a shame you can't do a staged return to the workplace, that way you could test the water before committing yourself fully.

You're bound to be apprehensive about the situation, but the longer you put off returning to work the more difficult it will become. I think you should go for it.
 
N

natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
10,985
#4
Hi Kerome,

I notiiced this earlier I couldn't manage to post.


For a number of a few years, I had previously worked in data entry and admin, in a full time role, and earning.


Then my mental health from years before i had the job, and always then onwards, got in the way, so I couldn't participate in paid work in any shape or form, I still can't today, owing to the fact, I have benefits in the way, and so to medication. I do get tired, from the effects of my meds, however to counteract that, I have intakes of caffeine, throughout the day, to keep me alert. Though presently, I have a plan I wish to come away from caffeine again, and stick with energiseing supplements to help see through the day, I have a feeling though that this isn't enough. So caffeine may have a part to play still.


Now, it has been voluntary work, I have been involved with, since 2004, i always had done, a couple of hours a day, nowadays, I offer, virtually all through the day, hours basis, from 10-3.30pm. 3pm at the earliest.


In terms of paid work though, I know from benefits, in which dad confirmed via their reporting confirmation, voluntary work I can do, paid- no. So there we have it, I am happily stuck with voluntary work.


I know I am stable via medication for pshycosis, and hearing voices, and paranoia, on high dose, not too high though, these days, so I have a feeling that when I'll be in surgery for GP appointment, on Friday, I'mm going to mention this aspect, whether if i can venture in to paid work, and I'll note his comments. He might just say and feel, that the med is keeping me stable for mental health purposes, and that work, shouldn't be interefering on that side, of things, well, that's the chance of answers I'll take, when I'm in the appointment.


Now in 2017, I certainly feel i am ready for work, thoiugh, I havne't got round to broaching the subject, with my mother and dad.


So I also do feel, that if you feel you can cope with a heavy demanding role, and bearing in mind the hours, and or overtime side of things to watch out for, I would say go for it , too.
 
write

write

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Messages
1,550
Location
stuck
#5
Kerome, it is a difficult question. Think confidence has huge impact, but this can hopefully grow in the job if you feel capable of doing the tasks asked of you in the job.
I know for definite that I can't work currently, am stuck in the dark, but this is different to previous times when I've had years off due to my mh and then gone back into work, never to the same job or employer.
The years of turmoil do take their toll.
I had 4 years off after losing my NHS job, then got back into part time work in mh, they wanted someone with experience of using mh services so that took pressure off having to negotiate explaining my time "off". I really wanted to work again, and felt I could cope with part (half time). I did for a couple of years but my mh struggle continued. (I had times of being under IHTT while also working in mh and contacting them as a patient and as a member of staff was very difficult). This job helped me get back into work but didn't help my mental health and again I lost it.
I have currently not worked for almost 9 years - so you could say am useless to reply to your thread - sorry x - and can't see a future in work as I'm worse than I was. I have not been able to manage voluntary work for the last few years either. My social skills have gone, and the social demands of work crushed me, but think that is me as well as my mh. It sounds as though you are in a very different place but only you will know - probably once you've taken the leap into work - whether you are ready, which is really hard to anticipate as you say...
If I had any advice it would be to suggest to do part time - initially at least - and build up if that works out. But if like me I found was constantly anxious whether at work or not...I wasn't well though and feel you have to feel pretty robust to feel ready "enough" to cope with all that work involves.
Phased starts are helpful.
I have had to be open about my mh for my own mh, with employers, feel that takes pressure off personally.
Ask for regular reviews so you can get feedback and keep communication open re how you are getting on and identifying any support you need, managing workload. I got very stressed not knowing levels of expectation and talking about this regularly helped.
Can you identify a mentor or buddy who you could meet to share how things are going with work but with someone who isn't part of your employer/work.
Sorry to go on, if any of this is useful I'd be surprised. I wish you well with what you decide to do, try not to put too much pressure on yourself xx
 
Prairie Sky

Prairie Sky

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2017
Messages
708
Location
Canada
#6
It's so hard to know, isn't it? On one hand it could do so much good (and the income is nice too) but on the other if you attempt too much it could bring you down again.

You're the only one who knows how you're doing and what you can handle. I know that you're going into this with both eyes open, and from the little I know of you on here, you're smart and level-headed enough to accomplish what you set out to do.

The only question I'd have for you is do you necessarily have to jump right into the job you're aiming for/used to have, or is it possible to work your way up to it, even by taking a part-time position for awhile just to get your mind and body used to what's expected of them?

Either way, I wish you all the best!
 
Boring

Boring

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 29, 2017
Messages
1,879
#7
"Are you ready to do regular work?"

are employers ready to accept me?
 
Kerome

Kerome

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
12,749
Location
Europe
#8
"Are you ready to do regular work?"

are employers ready to accept me?
This is true, and well said, but it’s an asymmetrical power relationship. For example my niece has a congenital defect with her ears, and some days that means her balance is really bad, and she literally can hardly stand, and so can’t work. This leads to her taking perhaps 7 sick days per year. For her most recent employers this was too much, and they fired her.

So you see a lot of employers insist on healthy, well-turned out staff with no disabilities, and can afford to do so. In a way English disability law is quite favourable, it at least forces them to make some adjustments, over here it is not well codified, there is just law for illness.
 
Kerome

Kerome

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
12,749
Location
Europe
#9
Thank you everybody for your thoughtful replies. I suspect if I get that far I will take the chance and try it. I’m only wondering how much skill I have forgotten in the last six years.

I really think the trick is not to accept too much stress from people or situations. To just hand back the stress, saying “this stress is not mine, I just do the best I can, and for the rest it is as existence wills it”. In most cases the only stress you experience is the stress you put on yourself, and if you look after that properly then it should be ok.

Of course that’s fine in theory, it’s the practice where things get tricky. But a lot of Buddhists manage these kinds of things, staying in their equanimity even in difficult circumstances, so it is possible. Just an exercise in staying mindful of your reactions to situations.
 
naominash

naominash

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 26, 2016
Messages
2,602
Location
North Carolina
#10
Here’s a question for you all: how do you know whether you are ready to go back to work, and whether you are able to do a certain job? I’m finding it difficult to answer this one.

Currently I’m doing a series of job interviews, and its for quite a demanding job, involving difficult technical questions, some performance pressure, responsibility for the work of others. So I’m finding it difficult to assess whether I’m ready to take it on, and I realise it’s the kind of job that would be challenging for a fully healthy person.

I’ve tried to do some tests and assessments, and they show that as a logical thinker I’m still quite sharp, and I have a lot of experience. But also that my ability to concentrate for sustained periods of time is not there yet - this could be rust or medication effects - and that my memory is not as sharp as I would like it to be.

It’s quite a serious question because if you do it and you break down due to stress or another episode, you may well end up being worse off than you were before.

So it’s a quandary... how would you approach something like this? How have you in the past made a choice for what kind of job to go for?
I'm beyond ready but that's just me.

I am high functioning and believe I have a good purpose. Every day I move forward. I believe I will be able to help a lot of people one day. Work is just a way to prepare me for that.

I don't think you would end up worse. I believe the only failure is in not trying. What would you accomplish if you knew you could not fail? Probably a lot. So go ahead.
 
burt tomato

burt tomato

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2013
Messages
29,837
Location
Mordor
#11
Earlier this year I got a job offer for full-time work, but it put me into a spiral of anxiety. I don't think I was really ready, and they withdrew the offer eventually.

I would like to remain on benefits and explore the possibility of permitted work. I could see this lasting for 2 years, or perhaps it could lead to something else in a natural sense.

One option is to work in Mental Health. I have not explored this, but it would be refreshing to be me, and not have to hide anything.

The other option is to work in Tech and just to do some study until I am ready.

I live near London which is an area with a wealth of jobs. I would consider working in the charity sector, as they would value my volunteer work and perhaps be less discriminatory about the my dx.
 
N

natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
10,985
#12
Hi Burt,

I enjoyed reading your post just now.


What a good idea, I hadn't thought even voluntary wise of that, to help or work in the mental health sector, i can see the point where you are coming from.


Off course you could work in Tech, though I can't decide for you, that's your own decision at the end of the day, however, this would mean that your tech skills wouldn't become rusty over time, so you would be keeping those updated, how about maybe, considering getting voluntary work going aside, rather than study, that way, you'll gain knowledge, how can I put it, me, personally, as I can't don't work, I am always fascinated to learn via commercial companies and shops establishments, how they get about their skils, during the working week, that's just my viewpoint.


Now some years back, I had wondered about permitted work, for me, realising since, and having been on medical benefits since 2004, right away, from becoming ill, i doubt, that would for me, be very pracitical it is however always a nice thouight, though for me to consider, and consult, with financial back up support father, if there ever came a time, for that opportunity to come up.

I have to take into account as well, I tire easily and quick, within a couple of hours, although depending on how much these days volunteering tasks there is to do, I offer a longer stint, as I am nowadays very well and stablised through meds, overall, though, i do become tired easily and quick, so i couldn't entertain an all or most of all day part time paid work, diagressing, apologies for that, once I'll start complimentary laughing, there's n o stopping me putting on my debate hat regarding work, benefits, volunteering.


Anyway it's nice to see that you do have a few realistic contingucency plans in place, I am sorry that your metnal health affected you regarding the job offer from earleir this year.


Best Regards,


Natalie.
 
burt tomato

burt tomato

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2013
Messages
29,837
Location
Mordor
#13
Thanks, Natalie, I would say you are quite an inspiration with your volunteer work and other activities.

Thanks to the thread I have just been looking at jobs.
 
N

natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
10,985
#14
Hi Burt,

Thanks.

I have been complimented in the past before via other posters in some form, of a previous former, fourm site, and possibly including here, i can't remember, from the earlier years, dating back to 2014, and I happen to be feeling a bit embarrassed, that I appear to be an inspiration, regarding my volunteer work, and other actiivities.

Anyway, i was embarrased in the past, I have now become more settled from the embarrassment side of things, accepting compliments, that I appear to be an inspiration. I just had never r ealised, that I was an inspiration! So I do greatly appreciate that.


I would take things stead in terms of jobs, Burt, because with you suggesting, that earlier in the year, your anxiety was in the way of the job offer, and that set you back, I would personally if it were me, think long and hard about jobs, certainly paid ones, and think long and hard about hours that you may have to be devoted to, and if required to be and on your part unwillingly you might feel, so don't go too over above board, with jobs please, I realise myself, I understand, year ago, I was looking for work, inadvertantly put down mental health on the application form, I then couldn't get very far! So that has always been a lesson to be learned from that.


Also I would act with caution because of your hearing voices, should you happen to have become unwell, in a day at work, a what if example, and or become suffering with hearing voices, eventually after a day at work, paid, they would expect you to be well enough to cope with such depending what the work was, demanding roles if at all, so I would carefully act with caution on that front, I've judged from your posts in hearing voices, how your voices do become, and we wouldn't want you to be suffering on the hearing voices unwell very acute front either. Just a couple of advice tips, there.


I am thrilled that the owner of this thread has inspired you to look at work, but please be careful, and try to test the waters first maybe with voluntary, before you jump in at the deep end.


Best Regards,


Natalie.
 
Kerome

Kerome

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
12,749
Location
Europe
#15
I suspect if I get that far I will take the chance and try it.
You know, after thinking about it for a few days I’ve reconsidered. I’ve basically said to them I withdraw my application for the management level position - it is too much learning, too much responsibility too quickly, too much stress. I’m going to look for something simpler.
 
N

natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
10,985
#16
HI Kerome,

I'm so glad that you have seriously taken the plunge to reconsider, and to re evaluate the demanding roles of the serires of interviews you were undertaking.


It does make sense that certainly for the time being, to look out for as you suggest, for something more simpler, or better still how about volunteering, that way, and if i may quote the expression already used elsewhere on this site, you get to test the water, before jumping in at the deep end.


I wish you well, to look for something more simpler.
 
C

Coast2

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
1,235
Location
UK
#17
You know, after thinking about it for a few days I’ve reconsidered. I’ve basically said to them I withdraw my application for the management level position - it is too much learning, too much responsibility too quickly, too much stress. I’m going to look for something simpler.
I'm glad you've carefully considered all your options thoroughly Kerome. I'm sure this is the best decision for you and I hope that you find something else very soon. It does sound like you're ready to go back to work.

All the best
 
R

ramboghettouk

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2008
Messages
14,801
Location
london
#18
i've worked and studied whilst on meds, you don't realise it's a problem until you try the tiredness the sleeping long hours when put under stress and then having to make the hours for work

and in employment you have to turn up regularly or lose wages, you can't work irregular hours due to illness
 
C

Coast2

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
1,235
Location
UK
#19
i've worked and studied whilst on meds, you don't realise it's a problem until you try the tiredness the sleeping long hours when put under stress and then having to make the hours for work

and in employment you have to turn up regularly or lose wages, you can't work irregular hours due to illness
I went back to work on a 'bank' contract within the NHS. If I did feel really ropey in the early days, I could just ring in and say I had something else on, although upon saying that I only did it a couple of times. But I started back doing three days a week. I was exhausted after I did my three days and would often sleep prett much for the remaining four. But bit by bit I've gained strength, got my self confidence back and now I'm ready to commit to a full time position.

But when I first went back to work there's no way I could have worked full time, I wasn't well enough. I've been very lucky to make a phased return and to do it at my pace.

Things are going very well for me now. I do still have bad days, and nights where I only get a couple of hours sleep, but they are few and far between now.
 
EddieH

EddieH

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 29, 2017
Messages
594
Location
Melbourne, Australia
#20
Really admire you guys getting back to work on antipsychotics. I had a lot of trouble personally crashing tractors and many general stuff ups, even sent home for drooling at one point. The medication's better now and maybe I could get back to some work but I'm close to getting a government pension, so it's a bit of a can of worms. I'm so bored and really miss having a purpose and workmates. Good luck everyone.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
T Getting Your Life Back! 5

Similar threads