Are we just a management problem?

BillFish

BillFish

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#1
What prompted me to ask, is a recent campaign for homeless people. Listening to the discussion on radio four, the assistant presenter pointed out that in one particular case a homeless man with addiction mental health issues had cost the NHS 100, 000 pounds a year for several years until he received help to get off the streets, because he was diabetic. Every time he was close to going into a diabetic coma, he would call an ambulance, then after a couple of days care would be sent straight back out to the streets again. She pointed out just how much money the nhs had saved by helping him.

Is there really actually much empathy on the Tory front bench, or back benches for disabled people or are we simply a management problem? At which point does genuine care and empathy for disabled people come into play? With psychiatrists and GP’s probably receiving bonuses for keeping people out of hospital, and over worked cpn’s rushing around to home visits for 5 minute visits, similar to care for the elderly. Are we simply management problems, to be kept out of the NHS beds and the overstretched prison system in order to save cash?
 
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#2
Think it's complex - the monetary system does dictate a lot of it all.

i also think it's a false economy - provide more comprehensive & effective care & support to begin with, & think it would save a lot of money.

People think mass drugging is cheap? i don't think it is, i think it's a very expensive endeavour on many levels - things may change when that is realised more?
 
Mark_01

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#3
The worse kind of homeless people, and the most dangerous, are the ones who want to be homeless and live off of the system and prey on other homeless people. They drink and do drugs and are prone to violence. And when it comes to handouts of food, clothing, and shelter, they are somehow always in the front of the line. I think they make a complex situation almost impossible to solve. They also make people very anti-homeless, and I can't blame them for being hostile and suspicious.

And to give credit where credit is due, the ladies from local churches are responsible for many homeless having a place to shower, get a meal, and some clean clothes.
 
Kerome

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#4
In a way mh is a management problem, true compassion and caring have been outsourced to the health services and professionalised, and after that made mechanical to fit into a system. This is the modern way of business, all invisible wheels and cogs making up process charts and org charts.

Ultimately label and drug is an expensive way of covering up the system enough so that people can live on benefits. But a life on benefits is also not cheap to the state. A cure would be far better.
 
BillFish

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#5
Three great replies, thanks:p " true compassion and caring have been outsourced to the health services and professionalised, and after that made mechanical to fit into a system" I wonder if management of the mad, was ever truly compassionate, I don't think it has been since Bedlam became an institution 300 years ago.
 
Mark_01

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#7
I rather doubt compassion can be mandated by the state. Church ladies have compassion, some doctors have compassion, the state has rigid rules enforced by faceless bureaucrats. Wonder how many of us have our fate decided by some dusty old clerk hidden in a windowless building?
 
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Three great replies, thanks:p " true compassion and caring have been outsourced to the health services and professionalised, and after that made mechanical to fit into a system" I wonder if management of the mad, was ever truly compassionate, I don't think it has been since Bedlam became an institution 300 years ago.
i think the real problem came in with the Enlightenment - it's all covered by Foucault in 'Madness & Civilisation' as pertinent today as when it was written. i do see a lot of the problem with the primary Zeitgeist/Paradigm - That in this Age of reason all Madness is largely seen as nonsense. The paradigm needs to change, which i see only really coming about with an end to Materialism - how/when/if that happens is anyone's guess?

"...the invention of madness as a disease is in fact nothing less then a peculiar disease of our Civilisation."
 

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