Are my problems serious enough to take care of them?

I

IvyAzalea

New member
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
1
Location
Germany
Hey there,
I decided to create an account and share my experience with mental health problems with the ulterior motive that someone here can actually answer my main topic question of are my problems valued and do I need help or not (even though I'm gonna be the one who answers this question in the end).
I also really wanna apologize for any mistakes grammatically wise or what so ever (English is my third language, but I try my best to explain to you what bother me).
In short: I feel mentally unstable for about 2 years now. I suffer from a rather extreme winter depression with symptoms that go as far as suicidal thoughts (I do not want to kill myself actively, rather I just don't want to exist). It sometimes happens (especially when I'm on my one having a lot of time to overthink literally everything in my life) that I get bouts of anxiety and OCD relapses (mostly sexual OCD). In addition, I imagine stuttering and believe I can't articulate correctly. As a result of that, I totally go crazy and don't dare to talk to anyone anymore.
Besides that, I'm very self-conscious and really afraid of the opinions of others. (Even though I'm well aware that this mindset is really stupid, it, unfortunately, doesn't change anything about the fact that there is a great fear of failure in me.) This fear forces me to procrastination. I can barely concentrate on learning or doing my homework for high school for fear of not being well enough (quite contradictory and stupid, I know).
I don't even feel like I'm able to fall in love with someone, even though I really would like to have someone by my side for whom I mean at least more than nothing.
I do also indulge in nostalgia and sincerely wish me back to my childhood in which everything was still easy and simple. (I even re-watch films and series that I saw and read the books I read back then just to get back into this weightless feeling).
As you can see, I do know very well about my problems and I also did have tried for a very long time to self-medicate, but so far without much success.
Nearly everybody with whom I've kinda talked about my problems said to me that everyone's struggling with such things and that my problems are not important enough to see a psychiatrist. I would take the space away from other patients who are worse off than me and that I should just get over it.
That honestly really hurt me. Living like that for me is like torture no one seems to want to understand it.

If you've made it this far, I really want to thank you with all my heart for taking the time to read about and deal with my problems. No, that is not self-evident to me. Thank you, and have a nice day!
 
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CharlieAB

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
8
Location
London
Hi there.

All I can say is, if you feel you are struggling enough to seek help, then that is enough reason for you to get help!
Seeking some therapy may be good for you?

A lot of what you are saying resonates with me, I feel so anxious about the opinions of others that it affects what I do, I limit myself and I hide away, I procrastinate and then I feel so guilty.
I also am very nostalgic and I re watch things from my childhood too! And I day dream about school and college wishing I could go back. I really understand this.

Im going back to therapy next week, I'm looking forward to getting a little help and I think you shouldn't feel bad for seeking help too!
When I first went to therapy I said 'I feel so stupid and selfish for being here as I don't have big problems' - she said - if you feel like your thoughts are affecting your way of life thats enough reason for you to be here.

Your feelings are valid!

Hope this helps x
 
A

Aurelius

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 14, 2018
Messages
316
Welcome to the forum IvyAzalea. Mental health is just like physical health - if we have a problem we cannot manage ourselves, we need to seek help. Here are a few reasons why you should seek support as soon as possible and not feel guilty about doing so:

Early intervention often provides the best opportunity to address issues without recourse to treatments that can have a significant impact on the quality of some of our daily life.

Early intervention is also far more cost and time effective for services than dealing with problems that have become too severe and chronic for short term therapy or so acute that they require specialist resources.

Early interventions can often be provided through primary care (i.e., not necessarily directly from a psychiatrist - but from other heath professionals they may refer you to) and this protects "the space available for other patients" who may require emergency or longer term access to specialist services.

Early interventions allow professionals to explore and decide with you how to move forward in managing problems with strategies that support your well-being and daily life.

Finally, it is good to have someone you can check out your progress, your concerns and your aspirations with and who knows the challenges you face.
 

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