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Anxious about Job Search/Interviewing

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Anxious4Days

Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
5
Location
Grand Rapids
The last six months have been a very stressful period in my life due to my current job being drastically influenced by the COVID pandemic. I work in a molecular diagnostics laboratory that has since shifted the majority of its focus to conducting coronavirus testing. The constant reminder of the extent of the pandemic as represented by the number of patient samples we are receiving has been weighing very heavily on me, so I have been applying for new jobs for several months. I've finally gotten a handful of interviews lined up over the next couple of weeks, and initially I was really energized and excited by the opportunity to interview. But now my mood has flip-flopped almost entirely, and I am now finding myself in fits of tears multiple times a day worrying about how devastated I'm going to be if none of these opportunities work out. How should I cope? The job search process is very long and the slowness of everything is only making things more difficult for me. The interviewing process is stressful enough without me feeling that this is a really high-stakes situation based on my current dissatisfaction at work. I'd be very appreciative of any advice.
 
C

Craig85r

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2018
Messages
10
As a fellow sufferer of anxiety I can totally relate. I am a recruiter for a large organisation and my sole role within that organisation is recruiting from the point of advertising to workplace inductions. As a full time recruiter I sit on the other side of the table and carry out the interviews. The best advice I can offer is to really read the job description prior to each interview and have 2 examples prepared for each point and really emphasise that you can relate to the role. Avoid the use of buzzwords such as 'team work, manage effectively' etc without following it up with an example. I can tell you from personal experience that buzzwords without follow up examples are empty answers. Finally, and probably the most important point is to be yourself. If you are nervous don't be scared to tell the interviewer that you feel that way. It makes the interview more personal and if you can build that rapport from the offset the you are 50% there. Ask the interviewer questions about the company and don't be scared to ask about their experiences working there.

There is also a great book that you can read about building up relationships. I read it to improve my skills with rapport building during interviews and would probably class it as the single best book I have ever read. How to Win Friends and Influence People: Amazon.co.uk: Dale Carnegie: 9780091906818: Books
 
A

Anxious4Days

Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
5
Location
Grand Rapids
As a fellow sufferer of anxiety I can totally relate. I am a recruiter for a large organisation and my sole role within that organisation is recruiting from the point of advertising to workplace inductions. As a full time recruiter I sit on the other side of the table and carry out the interviews. The best advice I can offer is to really read the job description prior to each interview and have 2 examples prepared for each point and really emphasise that you can relate to the role. Avoid the use of buzzwords such as 'team work, manage effectively' etc without following it up with an example. I can tell you from personal experience that buzzwords without follow up examples are empty answers. Finally, and probably the most important point is to be yourself. If you are nervous don't be scared to tell the interviewer that you feel that way. It makes the interview more personal and if you can build that rapport from the offset the you are 50% there. Ask the interviewer questions about the company and don't be scared to ask about their experiences working there.

There is also a great book that you can read about building up relationships. I read it to improve my skills with rapport building during interviews and would probably class it as the single best book I have ever read. How to Win Friends and Influence People: Amazon.co.uk: Dale Carnegie: 9780091906818: Books
Thank you so much for the constructive advice. You're definitely coming from an informed perspective working as a recruiter. I feel like I prepare for interviews thoroughly and well, but that I'm just getting in my head about the whole process and fearing disappointment. It really doesn't serve me well to think negatively, but my mind seems to gravitate in that direction. I'll definitely check out your book recommendation.
 
C

Craig85r

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2018
Messages
10
I'm glad that I was able to offer some advice from my experience. Interestingly I've never felt comfortable sitting on the other side of the table being interviewed. If it's any consolation, every person I have interviewed has been nervous. A good interviewer will re-assure you. Please do your homework on the job specs and prepare examples. There is also a fantastic video on YouTube that I will link below. It's about Power Posing and how it can change your whole mindset before going in to a stressful situation. It's just shy of 18 minutes long, but I would highly recommend it.

 
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