• Welcome! It’s great to see you. Our forum members are people, maybe like yourself, who experience mental health difficulties or who have had them at some point in their life.

    If you'd like to talk with people who know what it's like

And we’re back to rage..

firestorm

firestorm

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 14, 2013
Messages
200
Location
Johannesburg, South Africa
Not yet because my doctor wouldn't listen to me, but I am pretty certain I have it because several members of my family do and I show a lot of signs. I am hoping to see a doctor about it asap
It is a bit of a catch 22.

The employed and lower middle classes in South Africa have no access to medical care at all. Private is too expensive and the government won’t assist you if you are employed. I don’t know if that is the case in the UK, but I need to share the below with you as a cautionary tale.

14 years ago, I had a florid psychosis that sprang out of a very severe untreated manic episode. I left work at 24 hours notice and then had no access to healthcare. The psychosis lasted for 6 months until I started hurting myself badly. There is still a bit of my tongue missing (yes it is true; bitten off and you may laugh; I do). I gracefully have virtually no memory of the period, except for a very kind policeman who handle my transferral as a ward of the state to a state hospital.

My point is. You need medication now. The job can follow. It will also be difficult to function appropriately in an interview.

I have realised over the years that we think we are great pretenders, especially when manic. The sad reality is that this is not true. People do notice that something is ”off”. I am normally considered “eccentric“ when controlled, but part of the management of my BD is that a few people close to me would insist and sometimes take me to my psychiatrist when things start slipping. I certainly never think anything is wrong, because I off course am the most intelligent, great, and charming person (etc., etc.,...) in the universe (according to me) when manic. Thsee episodes happens very often with me because I have rapid cycling BD often with mixed episodes.

If I had to try an interview and hit bottom during the interview, the interviewers will be faced with someone who struggles to remember his own name, never mind psychomotor and balance issues. I don’t think I would even be able to complete the application because of cognitive effect caused by the rapid switch to the depressive phases.

My best school friend emigrated to the UK to practice psychiatry and still is as far as I know. His sister was sectioned in the UK as a South African with a visitors visa, when she had a schizophrenic breakdown. So the state took care of her until it was safe to move her back to SA.

The people/moderators on this form from the UK will be better able to help you with organisations. The only group I know of is The Samaritans, but I don’t think they deal with access to healthcare.

Get to a doctor and get on treatment.

Lots of Love and Support
 
GhostOfLenin

GhostOfLenin

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 16, 2020
Messages
2,550
Location
Glasgow
It is a bit of a catch 22.

The employed and lower middle classes in South Africa have no access to medical care at all. Private is too expensive and the government won’t assist you if you are employed. I don’t know if that is the case in the UK, but I need to share the below with you as a cautionary tale.

14 years ago, I had a florid psychosis that sprang out of a very severe untreated manic episode. I left work at 24 hours notice and then had no access to healthcare. The psychosis lasted for 6 months until I started hurting myself badly. There is still a bit of my tongue missing (yes it is true; bitten off and you may laugh; I do). I gracefully have virtually no memory of the period, except for a very kind policeman who handle my transferral as a ward of the state to a state hospital.

My point is. You need medication now. The job can follow. It will also be difficult to function appropriately in an interview.

I have realised over the years that we think we are great pretenders, especially when manic. The sad reality is that this is not true. People do notice that something is ”off”. I am normally considered “eccentric“ when controlled, but part of the management of my BD is that a few people close to me would insist and sometimes take me to my psychiatrist when things start slipping. I certainly never think anything is wrong, because I off course am the most intelligent, great, and charming person (etc., etc.,...) in the universe (according to me) when manic. Thsee episodes happens very often with me because I have rapid cycling BD often with mixed episodes.

If I had to try an interview and hit bottom during the interview, the interviewers will be faced with someone who struggles to remember his own name, never mind psychomotor and balance issues. I don’t think I would even be able to complete the application because of cognitive effect caused by the rapid switch to the depressive phases.

My best school friend emigrated to the UK to practice psychiatry and still is as far as I know. His sister was sectioned in the UK as a South African with a visitors visa, when she had a schizophrenic breakdown. So the state took care of her until it was safe to move her back to SA.

The people/moderators on this form from the UK will be better able to help you with organisations. The only group I know of is The Samaritans, but I don’t think they deal with access to healthcare.

Get to a doctor and get on treatment.

Lots of Love and Support
That really upsets me. Suerly healthcare should be a human right for all no matter where you are or what you do for a living.
 
M

Murasakibee

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 25, 2020
Messages
239
Location
Midwest USA
It is a bit of a catch 22.

The employed and lower middle classes in South Africa have no access to medical care at all. Private is too expensive and the government won’t assist you if you are employed. I don’t know if that is the case in the UK, but I need to share the below with you as a cautionary tale.

14 years ago, I had a florid psychosis that sprang out of a very severe untreated manic episode. I left work at 24 hours notice and then had no access to healthcare. The psychosis lasted for 6 months until I started hurting myself badly. There is still a bit of my tongue missing (yes it is true; bitten off and you may laugh; I do). I gracefully have virtually no memory of the period, except for a very kind policeman who handle my transferral as a ward of the state to a state hospital.

My point is. You need medication now. The job can follow. It will also be difficult to function appropriately in an interview.

I have realised over the years that we think we are great pretenders, especially when manic. The sad reality is that this is not true. People do notice that something is ”off”. I am normally considered “eccentric“ when controlled, but part of the management of my BD is that a few people close to me would insist and sometimes take me to my psychiatrist when things start slipping. I certainly never think anything is wrong, because I off course am the most intelligent, great, and charming person (etc., etc.,...) in the universe (according to me) when manic. Thsee episodes happens very often with me because I have rapid cycling BD often with mixed episodes.

If I had to try an interview and hit bottom during the interview, the interviewers will be faced with someone who struggles to remember his own name, never mind psychomotor and balance issues. I don’t think I would even be able to complete the application because of cognitive effect caused by the rapid switch to the depressive phases.

My best school friend emigrated to the UK to practice psychiatry and still is as far as I know. His sister was sectioned in the UK as a South African with a visitors visa, when she had a schizophrenic breakdown. So the state took care of her until it was safe to move her back to SA.

The people/moderators on this form from the UK will be better able to help you with organisations. The only group I know of is The Samaritans, but I don’t think they deal with access to healthcare.

Get to a doctor and get on treatment.

Lots of Love and Support
I live in the US, and I have to have medical insurance to get treatment. I was on state assisted insurance also known as Medicaid but I was cut off because I have no source.of income. I am not sure if even if my brother pays if I could get insurance because of my lack of income. I am not sure because I have only been seeing doctors for a couple years now, and my mother has a higr phobia of them and I think she has given me a lot of misleading information.

Although, I plan to go to the hospital regardless the next time I go into another psychotic or manic episode.....or have my brother take me to the hospital, I have informed him of my declining mental health so he's supposedly watching out for me.
 
firestorm

firestorm

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 14, 2013
Messages
200
Location
Johannesburg, South Africa
Our constitution has a bill of rights that is sacred to us all. The reality however is that the political elite make up rules and break them as they wish without any accountability or consequences of any sort.

A while back 143 mentally ill patients who were in permanent state care died due to starvation and neglect. It was called the Life Esidimeni Tragedy. According to me they died from our government‘s apathy, because the patients kept on dying while they knew it was developing into a crisis. The media and citizen groups were all over it, but everyday the number of dead increased. To my best knowledge no has been jailed, or fired for the horrific treatment of very vulnerable people. I don’t even think the United Nations or WHO did anything about it.

I often say that our sacred constitution as well as Nelson Mandela’s dream were both shattered into a million unfixable shards by this single event. The dream is now gone.
 
R

Rex Smith

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 30, 2020
Messages
259
Location
San Diego
When you guys go into mania what triggers it? if it's personal/sensitive you don't have to answer. Just curious.

I'm Bipolar too but my mania stopped years ago
If you're bipolar 2 then it's not that uncommon to have stopped experiencing manic episodes. From what I know about that classification, depression is the primary focus with small amounts of mania. Bipolar 1 has the difficult manic episodes that happen to occur regularly.

Triggers such as stress and anxiety in your home and work environment plays a big part in becoming overwhelmed with rage, especially for those living without medications.

There's a big difference between bipolar 1 and 2 so it's quite common that the people with the different type can't relate with one another.
 
7920NewbridgeCovina

7920NewbridgeCovina

Active member
Joined
Aug 19, 2020
Messages
32
Location
Minnesota
Sounds like I’m a 1. They never went into great detail when they slapped the label on me
 
M

Murasakibee

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 25, 2020
Messages
239
Location
Midwest USA
When you guys go into mania what triggers it? if it's personal/sensitive you don't have to answer. Just curious.

I'm Bipolar too but my mania stopped years ago
Sorry I hadn't seen this.

Mine is generally triggered by things becoming unstable. I sometimes have what I call smaller or calmer episodes but there are but three instances of really bad episodes.
These episodes were triggered by;

2016, on my birthday the ceiling caved in and my mom went off to bingo with the last of the money after she had promised to buy me McDonald's...after I had given the only food we had left to my brother in law....and then I got into a huge fight with my brother. I decided to runaway and things escalated from there....I was gone for nearly a week. Most of it was a blur. I eventually I ended up at my dad's raging and breaking his stuff telling him he was so terrible and I don't really remember most of what happened then either but he almost didn't give me back to my mom but I begged to go back

2017, by far the worst year, my dad died (exactly 1 week after my birthday, and actually I had gone out and celebrated my birthday that day with relatives....hench the birthday curse). My son was also taken from me a month after for awhile, and instead of sinking into deep depression I went very manic. I got into many arguments with family members, especially my mom, I never slept. I wrote lots and drew lots of art. I also got addicted to benadryl which did not help me sleep but it put me in a worst mood, and it caused me to hallucinate and I was convinced the neighbors were plotting against. I was really scary during that time and then lost my job at that point too. I was way out of control and probably should have been admitted to a hospital. This episode led to a very depressive episode following it, eventually I did get my son back.

2019, was still notable but I did not go as extreme. The cause was we ended up homeless at start of the year and we were living in a motel. I started working nightshift which for some reason triggered a pretty bad manic episode (hey I did write an entire book!) But things got pretty out of hand, not as bad as the other two time although I did threaten to punch the maid because he had tried to pick my son up after I said no (he was really creepy with both me and my son, he would call out to him to come to him and he would touch me and make me very uncomfortable ugh). I also screamed at my mom for a good two hours for really no reason and I would not let anyone help me with my son despite the fact that I was running on like zero sleep.
In 2019 about halfway through I had my worst depressive episode which really didn't make sense I got so depressed because by then everything was going RIGHT.
 
Top