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Amitryptiline

M

Marchhare

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Founding Member
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Mar 25, 2008
Messages
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Hi, anyone any experiences taking this AD?
I have to be off present meds for two weeks before starting Amitriptiline which is worrying me a lot, any advice on how to cope? maybe I will be fine with no meds BUT!!!!
Cheers
MH
 
NeoDelta

NeoDelta

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Feb 23, 2010
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Southampton
Im guessing your on a maoi, which is why you need to be off the meds for 2 weeks before you can start on amitriptyline. Ive been on amiytriptyline and it plunged me further into depression, not saying it will you, this is my experience, Im not allowed on this med again due to a suicide attempt with it.

I dont remember any side effects except sedation.

Hope that helps and all the best for it, hope it helps you.
 
D

DELATEXT

Guest
How's this ?

Amitriptyline is approved for the treatment of major depression, as well as clinical/endogenous depression and also involutional melancholia or "depression of late life", which is no longer seen as a disease in its own right. Adult typical dosages are 25 to 150 mg daily, with half this dose initially for elderly or adolescent patients.

Children between the ages of 7 to 10 years typically have a dose of 10 to 20 mg; older children 25 to 50 mg at night. It should be gradually withdrawn at the end of the course, which overall should be of no more than three months.[3]

Amitriptyline is used in ankylosing spondylitis for pain relief and in some European countries it is officially approved as a preventive for patients with frequent/chronic migraines, usually 25 to 75 mg. It is also used as a preventive for patients with recurring biliary dyskinesia (sphincter of Oddi dysfunction), usually 10 mg daily[4].
[edit] Unapproved/Off-label

Amitriptyline may be prescribed for other conditions such as insomnia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD),[5] migraine, rebound headache, chronic pain, tinnitus, chronic cough, postherpetic neuralgia (persistent pain following a shingles attack), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), fibromyalgia, vulvodynia, interstitial cystitis, male chronic pelvic pain syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), diabetic peripheral neuropathy, neurological pain, and painful paresthesias related to multiple sclerosis and at low doses as a prophylaxis (preventive) for patients with chronic migraines.[6] Typically lower dosages are required for pain modification of 10 to 50 mg daily.[3]

Amitriptyline in low doses is also sometimes prescribed to help ease the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome. It is thought to help combat symptoms of insomnia primarily, in addition to other selected symptoms of the affliction.[citation needed]

A randomized controlled trial published in June 2005 found that amitriptyline was effective in functional dyspepsia that did not respond to a first-line treatment (famotidine or mosapride).[7]
[edit] Pharmacology

Amitriptyline acts primarily as a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, with strong actions on the norepinephrine transporter, and moderate effects on the serotonin transporter.[8][9] It has negligible influence on the dopamine transporter and therefore does not affect dopamine reuptake, being nearly 1,000 times weaker on it than on serotonin.[9]

Amitriptyline additionally functions as a 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT6, 5-HT7, α1-adrenergic, H1, and mACh receptor antagonist, and σ1 receptor agonist.[10][11][12][13] It has also been shown to be a relatively weak NMDA receptor negative allosteric modulator at the same binding site as phencyclidine.[14] Amitriptyline inhibits sodium channels, L-type calcium channels, and Kv1.1, Kv7.2, and Kv7.3 voltage-gated potassium channels, and therefore acts as a sodium, calcium, and potassium channel blocker as well.[15][16][17]

Recently, amitriptyline has been demonstrated to act as an agonist of the TrkA and TrkB receptors.[18] It promotes the heterodimerization of these proteins in the absence of NGF and has potent neurotrophic activity both in-vivo and in-vitro in mouse models.[18]
[edit] Side effects

Common side effects of using amitriptyline are mostly due to its anticholinergic activity, including: weight gain, dry mouth, changes in appetite, drowsiness, muscle stiffness, nausea, constipation, nervousness, dizziness, blurred vision, urinary retention, insomnia and changes in sexual function. Some rare side effects include tinnitus, hypotension, mania, psychosis, sleep paralysis, hypnagogia, hypnopompia, heart block, arrhythmias, lip and mouth ulcers, extrapyramidal symptoms, depression, and hepatic toxicity.
[edit] Overdose
Main article: Tricyclic antidepressant overdose

Hope this helps you, wikipedia information




:oops::grouphug:
 
Astrid

Astrid

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Joined
Mar 24, 2010
Messages
75
Location
USA
I have been taking it for about 10 years, but it was prescribed to me for insomnia, not depression (though I do have MDD). I have not experienced any bad effects from it except that my body seems to be addicted to it, meaning if I don't take for say a few days to a week, I feel physically ill and unable to get to sleep (I have tried going off it several times and haven't managed to go without it, even when gradually decreasing the dose). So that would be my only concern for you.
 
B

BP2

Guest
Good luck - I hated it.

I was only taking 10-20mg to help me sleep. It gave me the worst dry mouth, headaches and sweats that I had ever experienced. I was unable to function at all the next day and it did little for my sleep.

I can only assume I had a very bad reaction to it. I couldn't imagine having to titrate to an effective dose for Depression.

I hope your experiences are much more favorable than mine.
 
M

Marchhare

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Founding Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
986
Location
SW
Thanks BP2. I was originally prescribed 10mg for pain relief but now it is being upped to 25mg. Just spoken to psych doc about my concerns which wasn't particularly helpful (he means well :)
Don't really know what to do but as he said if I don't try it I will never know if it is helpfull. Mmmmmmmmmmmmm.:confused:
mh
 
S

*Sapphire*

Guest
I'm on 25 mg, and I must admit I have been getting headaches since i have had it. It does help me sleep better, I'm certainly not the insomniac I was when I first joined this forum a year ago (or I still am but the meds are counteracting it!).
 
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