Advice sought

J

Jubags

New member
Joined
Mar 15, 2018
Messages
3
#1
Wondering if anyone can advise me please. My mum is 84 she has health problems which consist of COPD & overactive thyroid, all managed well with inhalers and medication. My mum is mentally very fit, does crosswords and puzzles and knits beautiful garments following intense knitting patterns. 4 months ago we lost my father. My mum couldn't cry - she said she hadn’t the energy! She has had around the clock support from her family. Just over a week ago she started to become distracted and lacking in concentration ( would lose train of thought mid sentence). This developed over the next few days as becoming confused and talking “mumbo jumbo” talking about present day and reverting back to past and childhood! We contacted the doc after we considered it may be a water infection. Doc agreed and antibiotics were given but no improvement made. She has now been admitted to hospital and they are concentrating on her breathing rather than her mental state and now say there was no water infection. I think they think she has dementia but she doesnt! My theory - could it be a breakdown after the death of my dad? I am meeting with doc tomorrow to try and get some answers but I’m not sure they fully realise that my mum was so mentally capable up to a fortnight ago and how could she deteriorate so quickly? Hi
 
calypso

calypso

Well-known member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2011
Messages
40,486
Location
Lancashire
#2
People don't "suddenly" get dementia and you must fight for your mother. It sounds like intense grief and the elderly have a different way of expressing it often. I think you should ask for grief counselling for her and get her to open up if you can. CRUSE are a charity which help with all types of grief and can advise the hospital as well as help your mother.

It might be an idea to read Psychosis and the Elderly Person - Information from the Mental Health Forum in case there is anything there that might help you. Don't let the diagnosis of dementia be put on her as it colours all treatment from then on in. Being in hospital is enough for many elderly people to lose their insight into their world as they wake up in a strange place.
 
Cazcat

Cazcat

Well-known member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 12, 2013
Messages
2,421
#3
Definitely make it clear to the hospital staff that these cognitive problems are new. This needs to be properly investigated. There are many physical problems that can cause confusion and delirium in elderly people such as infections, constipation and dehydration. Strokes can also just affect people's cognition sometimes. Then of course it is highly possible that there is a psychological cause in response to the grief. Depression is very common in the elderly and often under treated in this group too. Keep fighting for your Mum to get the right diagnosis.
 
B

Bellamilo

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 9, 2018
Messages
55
Location
UK
#4
Ive worked nearly five years with dementia and it is a very slow but long oncoming. Depression or grief can hit people in many way. Many people have delayed grief
 
J

Jubags

New member
Joined
Mar 15, 2018
Messages
3
#5
Thank you

Ive worked nearly five years with dementia and it is a very slow but long oncoming. Depression or grief can hit people in many way. Many people have delayed grief
Thank you. I just wanted the reassurance that what I was thinking was right. I will fight tooth and nail for her !
 
J

Jubags

New member
Joined
Mar 15, 2018
Messages
3
#6
Thank you. I just wanted the reassurance that what I was thinking was right. I will fight tooth and nail for her !