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Advice RE: Psychoanalysis

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ReneeWalker

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2010
Messages
19
Location
Australia
Hi All,

I have been referred to a Psychoanalysis by my Psychiatrist and Psychologist because they say they cannot help me and I need to see one of them.

I see him in 2 weeks.

Does anyone have experience of seeing one?
Or know of anyone who as seen one?
Or in general does anyone know what they do in there treatments?

Any information or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
 
D

DELATEXT

Guest
Psychoanalysis (or Freudian psychology) is a body of ideas developed by Austrian physician Sigmund Freud and continued by others. It is primarily devoted to the study of human psychological functioning and behavior, although it can also be applied to societies. Psychoanalysis has three applications:

1. a method of investigation of the mind and the way one thinks;
2. a systematized set of theories about human behavior;
3. a method of treatment of psychological or emotional illness.[1]



from wikipedia, hope this helps ??

:unsure: :grouphug:
 
R

ReneeWalker

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2010
Messages
19
Location
Australia
Thanks

Thanks, that does help for now!

But I am looking more at someone who has been to one or knows of someone who has!!

xx
 
oneday

oneday

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2010
Messages
5,019
Location
London
Hi Renee (posted this somewhere else you asked, but just in case you missed it)

I'll try and post something more another day - it's a big question - but in the meantime, you could have a look at these links:

Booklet on 'Understanding Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis' on Mind's website
http://www.mind.org.uk/help/medical_...psychoanalysis

You could also contact the British Association for Counselling & Psychotherapy (BACP)'s Client Information Helpdesk: 01455 883316 to discuss your queries or concerns - they used to publish a little booklet about counselling and psychotherapy but I don't know if they do still.

I've had several years experience of psychoanalytic psychotherapy myself (among other types of counselling and therapies) and have done training in psychotherapy, so could have lots to say! But I don't have time now.

So in answer to your particular questions - Q1 yes and Q2 yes, and finally Q3 'that would take too long to answer just now - check the Mind booklet for some info on this....'

I'll be back. Hope other people have ideas/experiences too.
 
oneday

oneday

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2010
Messages
5,019
Location
London
Renee,

Also noticed the sticky above the 'Recovery...'(etc) section on the forum, posted by admin - that the Mental Health Foundation publish a booklet entitled 'Talking Therapies Explained' which can be downloaded via a link at.....

http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/publi...herapies¬

It discusses talking therapies in general, and has a section on "psychodynamic psychotherapy" - 'psychodynamic' and 'psychoanalytic' psychotherapies are basically the same thing.

As the booklet says, you probably need to be interested in devoting time (and mental energy, I'd say) to self-exploration to benefit from - well, again, I'd say from all but especially - psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy.

I remembered that I was involved in putting together a description of the various types of counselling and therapy in a guide I was involved in producing a few years back with local charities and user groups. Under the section 'Psychoanalytic 'Psychotherapy & Psychodynamic Counselling' (and this was approved by the British Psycho-analytic Society), I said:

"On the whole, psychoanalytic and psychodynamic therapies are based most closely on the ideas of Freud and other therapists who developed his theories. The psychotherapist or counsellor aims to help you gain insight into how inner conflicts, feelings, thoughts and fantasies are affecting your current life and difficulties. Often this involves exploring the influence of past experiences and relationships, particularly those from childhood, with the aim of enabling you to be freer to make changes in the present.

Psychodynamic and psychoanalytic approaches tend to be more long term (lasting anything from several months to several years). You might arrange to meet a counsellor or therapist for an hour a week (an actual hour or the 'analytic hour' of 50 minutes), while some therapists will prefer to see you two, three of four times a week. Psychoanalysts providing full psychoanalytical treatment (the closest to Freud's own way of working) will expect to see you four or five times a week. There are also group therapies based on psychoanalytic ideas - group analytic therapies.

Jungian analysis, also known as 'analytical psychology', developed by Freud's contemporary Carl Jung, has its own particular theories and focus. The Jungian approach is particularly concerned with areas such as creativity and growth, mythology, spirituality, and a personal search for meaning in life."

Also, at the beginning of the chapter on 'talking treatments' I/we wrote:

"Selecting a talking treatment from the many alternatives out there can be a daunting task. Reading more about what is available can help, as can advice or recommendations. Different approaches can suit different people at different times. Probably the most important thing is to choose someone you feel you can relate to and trust. Make sure he or she is properly qualified or belongs to a reliable professional body."
 
R

ReneeWalker

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2010
Messages
19
Location
Australia
Thanks

Thanks for replies,

I shall keep you updated on how it goes.
 
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