Adolescent depression male mood swings

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FartherDane

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
5
#1
Dear reader,

My son is a young man and still only 16. He had a fast developed in growth and became for one year ago a teen in an adult body. All that with pimples, beard growth and deep voice. He is very nice and loving boy, quite reasonable, does not smoke, drink, take drugs etc. but of cause a teen and he does not want to talk with everything with his parents. That is natural behavior. He has previously been playing football and was quite active. Now he is playing a loft of PS4 and stay indoor playing with his online friends.

My son got sick last winter where is started due the seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and apparently because of lack of natural sun light and then a depression. We know for sure this a genetic factor he got from me and that his cousin also inherited this defect.
My son is now on 300 mg venlafaxine because we have not yet seen a significant stabilization improvement in his mood. I mean 75% of the time he has improved in his health and fell almost like normal. The last 25% say every week or 2nd week he still gets some back drops (or mood swing) where he gets really depressed. Then he is sick with major depression again with all know symptoms and this is very hard for him and us because it is very demotivating. This pattern has been going on for nearly 10 months.

His also getting light therapy every morning and all the necessary vitamins that may have a known positive influence on depression.
He psychiatrist also says that he needs to wait until the 300 mg venlafaxine really starts to work ‘in depth’ say from 3-4 after he has been on the 300 mg dose permanently. His psychiatrist also say this depression back drops/mood swing with a duration of 3-5 day this is not a normal pattern.

But why does this back drops/mood swing with a duration of 3-5 day pattern just continue to come? – Or any similar experiences with the age? Any good advice we are missing?
Or is there any specialist in the US which really know how to handle or cure this disorder for teenagers? Thank you so much!
 
C

chefbengenie

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
58
Location
New Jersey
#2
i am not too familiar with it only that my daughter played video games all of the time and has pale skin and can get depressed. She is a lot better but has moved to NYC with girlfriend. The only thing that comes to mind is to create some sort of a journal and observe his actions and what might be causing the 25%. There might be some triggers that can be identified, and if they are consistent, come up with some sort of game plan (i don't know, game night, movie night, go out for pizza, go for a walk?). See how that helps, but make sure you don't stop your love and support and if you figure out these triggers, that is the time to maybe show more love and support and understanding. It might also be the time to re-examine his medication and the need for another mood stabilizer or a supporting one. if you are able to create a time table, then you have evidence that you can share with the psychiatrist that might be helpful. hope this helps.
 
F

FartherDane

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
5
#3
Thanks for your thinking chefbengenie. Good thoughts!

But it is odd that my son still have this back drops/mood swing as I described above with a duration of 3-5 day pattern and they just continue to come. Also this week.
What can be the actual reason? Is it some psychology inside him and his thinking or is it the brain chemistry where he just need some additional medication?
And how many smaller day-to-day challenges can you give to depressed teenager e.g. saying ‘I expect you do some exercise in a fitness/gym minimum twice a week this would also help to your healing’.
Or maybe I can say ‘If you don’t prefer fitness/gym twice a week you shall go to school on your bike both ways’.
I know these questions sounds odd if you think I was a normal healthy teen but this young man has drops up and down in mood swings so I find it difficult to push him. Please advice us.
 
C

chefbengenie

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
58
Location
New Jersey
#4
there is no formula

i have a daughter who caused us a lot of grief growing up, not necessarily from her being a bad girl (drugs and such) but her depression, isolation, lack of interaction, lies about school, and whole host of things just kicked our butt. There were a lot of tough times, and even at 26, she still has issues but refuses to use medication, especially with my family history. I really wish i could give you secondary advice, but i can't. One thing to remember, is that as a person who has mental problems, the struggle that we face internally isn't even close to what others don't have to deal with. If others could see into our minds, it could change the way things are understood, but science isn't quite there. The internal struggles are exhausting and demoralizing and can have a devastating affect on confidence, self worth, and a whole host of other things. I truly wish i could say something that would be a panacea, but there really isn't one when it comes to how the brain works. I have daily ups and downs, and my wife has to deal with that, but as she has said before, when she can see it in my eyes, she'll ask "are you ok?". All i usually say is i'm ok or just having a moment. Maybe the only thing you can do is just ask him if he is ok and if he wants to talk about it. I'm sorry things work like this from both sides of it. it isn't easy and i hope you can find some peace in my words or a direction.
 

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