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Acupuncture for Schizophrenia and mental illness

A

Adrienn

Guest
At dinner the other night, my sister in law said she had spoken to her acupuncturist about hearng voices and psychosis, and mental illness.
He said that he had treated people for these things, and that acupuncture was very effective. He said that he saw it as a process, or cycle that the person had to go through. The problem with medication was that it blocked the process, and so they were not able to complete the cycle, and became stuck.

So I have decided to a bit of a look up on Acupuncture, and see what comes up on the internet.

Here is the first link, describing the points they treat it with, http://www.acupuncture.com/conditions/schizo.htmnd

the tongue diagnosis is interesting.

This woman here is trying to do some research on its effctiveness
http://www.scienceblog.com/cms/schizophrenia_and_acupuncture_9249

"3. ACUPUNCTURE AND SCHIZOPHRENIA

Several studies (mainly in China) have found positive results for acupuncture in the treatment of schizophrenic patients. I would like to give some examples here: several studies treated schizophrenic patients with electro acupuncture combined with chlorpromazine, these patients were able to use less chlorpromazine and had better results than control groups that used chlorpromazine alone (Bosch & Jørgensen, 2005; Dey, 1999; Flaws & Lake, 2001). Unfortunately, acupuncture was not found to have an effect on delusions. Specific effects, however, that were found in many studies with all kinds of modalities of acupuncture (manual acupuncture, electro acupuncture, laser acupuncture) on schizophrenic patients (see Dey, 1999 for a review) were: a decrease in auditory hallucinations, an improvement in patients with catatonic stupor and a reduction in the amount of western medicine that was required. One study on insomnia found that acupuncture was highly effective for patients who were ineffectively treated with western drugs before. The EEG waves of effectively treated patients showed lower alpha numbers, decreased alpha rate, and lowered alpha wave amplitude. There was even a gradual increase of Q waves (Dey, 1999)."

Here is a link to a book on the subject called
Soothing a troubled mind, by Thomas Dey
http://www.paradigm-pubs.com/html/sootromin.html

Here is a link to a study that found it was as effective as drugs, but i do not know how to access it, and it is in Chinese. Maybe someone else here has read it?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1860386&dopt=Abstract

"Psychiatric hospital of kai luan mine bureau, Tangshan.

A controlled study of clinical therapeutic effects of laser acupuncture was made for 33 patients suffering from schizophrenia. As evaluated by BPRS, CGI, a rating scale for extramidal side effects and chinese clinical assessments for therapeutic effects. Our clinical practise suggests that laser acupuncture was as effective as chlorpromazine in the treatment of schizophrenia."

Last one for the night
http://www.itmonline.org/arts/acubrain.htm
"Acupuncture was applied in the treatment of depression and psychosis in aged patients at the Institute of Mental Hygiene in Beijing (14). The patients were aged 50-74 and suffered from conditions such as manic-depressive psychosis, reactive psychosis, and neurosis. The treatment focused on baihui (GV-20) and yintang (M-HN-3), using electroacupuncture stimulation. Of 30 patients treated, it was claimed that marked effects were observed in 19 (about 2/3). The claimed improvements were in depressed mood, suicidal intention, anxiety, insomnia, and irritability, as well as alleviation of some accompanying physical symptoms.

Anxiety neurosis was treated at the Qindao Medical University using acupuncture in 80 patients, some of which were young students (aged 18 or over), but most were older workers, up to age 72 (15). The main points used were zusanli (ST-36), neiguan (ST-25), taichong (LV-3), shenshu (BL-23), mingmen (GV-4), and quchi (LI-11). Treatment was every other day for 10 treatments, with a break of 3-7 days before beginning another course of treatment, up to 40 treatments. The therapy was reported to be highly effective, with 55 of the patients showing obvious alleviation of symptoms. "

And this on a study in Mongolia
"A study on treatment of schizophrenia, involving acupuncture and herbs, was reported from a hospital in Mongolia (7). Acupuncture was performed with three groups of points, with one group treated each day consecutively, then repeated. The point groups were:

renzhong (GV-26), shangxing (GV-23), neiguan (PC-6), xuangzhong (GB-39);
yintang (M-HN-3), hegu (LI-4), taichong (LV-3), yanglingquan (GB-34); and
baihui (GV-20), shanzhong (CV-17), quchi (LI-11), yongquan (KI-1).
Several of the points were treated by acupuncture through to a nearby point, such as neiguan through to waiguan, or hegu through to houxi. The authors claimed that all patients were cured by the treatment, though the condition recurred in 11 cases of 53, which could then be controlled by 1-2 courses of additional treatment. A course of treatment lasted one week to one month, depending on the patient, with daily acupuncture."

The research was from this source

Wu Fengqi, Treatment of schizophrenia with acu-moxibustion and Chinese medicine, Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine 1995; 15(2): 106-109.

Okay, just one more

http://www.medicalacupuncture.org/acu_info/articles/acupuncture_bibliography.html

"Zhou, G., Jin, S. B., and Zhang, L. D.; Comparative clinical study on the treatment of schizophrenia with electroacupuncture and reduced doses of antipsychotic drugs. Am J Acupunct 1997. Vol.25[1], p.25-32. Twenty-five of 40 patients were treated with electroacupuncture (EA) at 180 Hz for 36 sessions with points based on TCM diagnosis and compared to 15 receiving only anti-psychotic drugs. Drug use was translated into chlorpromazine equivalents (ie, 1.6 mgm haloperidol equals 100 mgm, etc.) DSM-III criteria were used for diagnosis with those scoring over 35 on the brief psychiatric scale rating accepted for study. Five TCM diagnostic catagories were also used. The EA treated were needled at Yintrang deeply, PC 6, 7, and Taiyang (Ex-HN 5), with supplemental needles at ST 36, 40, or SP 6 depending on TCM diagnosis. EA patients used 60% less medication for an effect equivalent to the control group, with much less side effects. Calmed behavior occurred in 2 weeks in the EA group versus 4 in controls. Plasma levels of both beta- endorphin and cyclic AMP were markedly lower than normal in the patients before study and increased with symptom improvement. Yintang punctured to the nasal bridge heart zone calms and tranquilizes and helps mental equilibrium and clears "Heart Fire" as do the other main points used. Comment: An impressive study, with statistics given that can be recalculated by the purist. The randomization method is not given. The duration of diagnosis averaged 8.2 years. The exact placing of electrodes is not given, with two pairs of points used each day.

Zhuge, D. Y. and Chen, J. K.; Comparison between electro-acupuncture with chlorpromazine and chlorpromazine alone in 60 schizophrenic patients. [Chinese]. Chung Kuo Chung Hsi I Chieh Ho Tsa Chih 1993. Vol.13[7], p.408-9,:388. Yangzhou 2nd People's Hospital, Yangzhou [225(À)2]. Thirty schizophrenic patients were treated with electro-acupuncture and chlorpromazine therapy compared to the thirty patients in the control group only utilizing chlorpromazine. The curative effect was evaluated for each group with a brief rating scale, I$1'RS. Data demonstrated that the overall "curative" effects of the two groups were similar. However, clinical improvements appeared earlier in the combined therapy group. Less chlorpromazine was indicated in that combined group; hence, the patients in that group displayed fewer side effects.

Thats me for now.

Regards
Adrienne
 
S

student2011

New member
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
1
Hello Adrienne,

I recently came across your post in my Google search. I am a Chinese medical student and am studying acupuncture as part of my scope of practice.

I was wondering if your sister-in-law found any relief or decrease of symptoms with acupuncture? Was she using it as her sole therapy or in conjunction with medications? Did she use other forms of therapy - cupping, moxa, herbal formulas?

I recently have had an interest in perhaps specializing in brain disorders. Classically, there are many protocols to relieve 'depression' (which we call 'Melancholia'); however, many of the protocols for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders are not translated in English as much.

Any sort of information would greatly be appreciated.

Thanks
 
F

Fnf2017

New member
Joined
Oct 5, 2017
Messages
1
Hello Adrienne,

I recently came across your post in my Google search. I am a Chinese medical student and am studying acupuncture as part of my scope of practice.

I was wondering if your sister-in-law found any relief or decrease of symptoms with acupuncture? Was she using it as her sole therapy or in conjunction with medications? Did she use other forms of therapy - cupping, moxa, herbal formulas?

I recently have had an interest in perhaps specializing in brain disorders. Classically, there are many protocols to relieve 'depression' (which we call 'Melancholia'); however, many of the protocols for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders are not translated in English as much.

Any sort of information would greatly be appreciated.

Thanks
Hi student2011
Was wondering how you got on with your studies? Did you specialise in brain disorders? I wanted some advice on chinese medicine for the treatment of schizophrenia/psychosis? Can it work alone without antipsychotics?
 
N

natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
16,316
HI Adirenne,


I think I pprefer to stick with what i know, apart from and I'll do cross stitching with those sort of needs which are sometimes tiny to small, or large depending on the size of needle eye wish to work with, for the sewing, now I get nervous, even for a blood test needle, so let alone for accupuncture for szchophrenia.


Regards,


I'm Natalie, and I have mild szcohphrenia conditions, which are annoying when rearing their ugly heads. Particularly, anxiety, and also paranoia, hearing voices, well, I can manage thankfully through oral medication.



A note for moderating team, I hadn't realised this was such an old thread, I wouldn't have posted my opinon, otherwise. Thanks.
 
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