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A Theory for the root Cause of BPD

S

SJS

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I preface this by saying i'm not a professional, and i do this just as a passion and a hobby..

I don't suffer from BPD myself, but i've been thinking of the potential causes. What makes someone borderline compared to another person, and you'll have to let me know if this resonates with any of you who do suffer from it.. However, i have to explain a couple of relevant things first for this to fully make sense.

When believing something it involves investing agreement into an idea. A belief when broken down into it's parts is simply an idea + agreement. An idea you've agreed is true. However, what i have discovered is there are degrees to which people invest agreement into ideas.

Some people will invest a LOT of agreement, and this makes a belief feel very solid and secure. Some people however, take everything with a pinch of salt. They don't go all in on a belief, and reserve some doubt.

So my theory is this :

The black and white thinking, which is a key symptom of borderline personality, could be due to investing too much agreement into an idea.

So say you put all your trust in someone very easily, this belief feels extremely secure, you're feeling very happy.. Suddenly you find out this person has betrayed you in some huge way. What happens? What once felt so secure now emotionally swings completely to the opposite side. Like having the rug pulled out from under you.

Could BPD be a result of simply not having enough doubt when committing to a belief? If so, taking everything with a pinch of salt might negate the symptoms of borderline personality disorder completely.

This is easier said than done of course, because the brain actually automatically forms beliefs without you consciously having to do anything. But perhaps if it were ingrained as a practice to throw in a little doubt with everything, it might form a habit that could resolve this issue of emotional instability.

Let me know what you think of this, and if it sounds accurate.
 
D

Dagoon

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I agree with you to some extent. I have borderline personality disorder and how I have managed to overcome some of the obstacles is by saying to myself that no one persons beliefs are right or wrong they are just their own perceptions based on what they know. And those beliefs change as their information is added too. Its very hard to overcome bpd in that you have to constantly monitor what you are saying and doing. So you have to have various amounts of therapy/interactions with others that don't have it or at least are aware they do so you can relearn social educate. Most if not all bpd sufferers were triggered by abuse of some kind as children. Mine was no different. And this abuse as a child during important milestones can set you back massively. You learn as a child from the adults around you. And if those adults are teaching you inappropriate age related issues then if you dont have natural instincts of survival then your outcome can be very badly effected.

Just my view and I do go on tangents as my concentration is hard today.
 
PetPetsPelts

PetPetsPelts

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So my theory is this :

The black and white thinking, which is a key symptom of borderline personality, could be due to investing too much agreement into an idea.

So say you put all your trust in someone very easily, this belief feels extremely secure, you're feeling very happy.. Suddenly you find out this person has betrayed you in some huge way. What happens? What once felt so secure now emotionally swings completely to the opposite side. Like having the rug pulled out from under you.

Could BPD be a result of simply not having enough doubt when committing to a belief? If so, taking everything with a pinch of salt might negate the symptoms of borderline personality disorder completely.

This is easier said than done of course, because the brain actually automatically forms beliefs without you consciously having to do anything. But perhaps if it were ingrained as a practice to throw in a little doubt with everything, it might form a habit that could resolve this issue of emotional instability.

Let me know what you think of this, and if it sounds accurate.
no.

for me it is an uncontrolled perspective of greatness toward an individual that is unattainable by anyone. So inevitably I will go from full on respecting, cherishing, complementing and loving them; or rather obsessing over them; to slowly pointing out their imperfections. This leads to eventually internally building resentment for failing to meet my expectations.
Rather, it's expecting perfection and blowing it out of proportion when it ends up less than perfect.

For me, I believe this stems from a lack of self acceptance... Self-hate. Trying to love absolutely without loving myself leading to observing the flaws in others because all I can do is see the flaws in myself.

I trust nobody, I have nearly zero naivety and already expect the worst in everyone. But there are those few exceptions (favorite persons) who; somehow; tower above on their pedestal in my eyes until I slowly chop away at the throne I built for them only to watch it all fall apart.
 
B

Butterfly3

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I appreciate your attempt to think about why we suffer from BPD and your theory is very interesting. However one of the symptoms of BPD is dissociation/paranoia. Paranoia means that I do go into everything with suspicion. While I am very black and white about everything I am also extremely paranoid. I absolutely adore and whole heartedly love my favourite person, but I am also extremely paranoid that she likes other people more than me, is cheating, is going to abandon me etc. However thank you again for thinking so much about this and I’d be interested to hear any other theories you have x
 
S

SJS

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I appreciate your attempt to think about why we suffer from BPD and your theory is very interesting. However one of the symptoms of BPD is dissociation/paranoia. Paranoia means that I do go into everything with suspicion. While I am very black and white about everything I am also extremely paranoid. I absolutely adore and whole heartedly love my favourite person, but I am also extremely paranoid that she likes other people more than me, is cheating, is going to abandon me etc. However thank you again for thinking so much about this and I’d be interested to hear any other theories you have x
Interesting.. So maybe it goes both ways. So then i would add to the theory, not only do people with BPD invest too much agreement in a belief, but also too much doubt when any suspicions are raised. Like two sides of the same coin.
 
S

SJS

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no.

for me it is an uncontrolled perspective of greatness toward an individual that is unattainable by anyone. So inevitably I will go from full on respecting, cherishing, complementing and loving them; or rather obsessing over them; to slowly pointing out their imperfections. This leads to eventually internally building resentment for failing to meet my expectations.
Rather, it's expecting perfection and blowing it out of proportion when it ends up less than perfect.

For me, I believe this stems from a lack of self acceptance... Self-hate. Trying to love absolutely without loving myself leading to observing the flaws in others because all I can do is see the flaws in myself.

I trust nobody, I have nearly zero naivety and already expect the worst in everyone. But there are those few exceptions (favorite persons) who; somehow; tower above on their pedestal in my eyes until I slowly chop away at the throne I built for them only to watch it all fall apart.
Reminds me of a couple of quotes :

"Never meet your heroes"

and

"The quickest way to fall out of love is to get to know someone." (or something like that, can't remember the exact quote).

After the last couple of comments, i would have to expand the theory to try and fit this side in too, but only for some individuals. That not only do people with BPD maybe invest too much agreement into a belief, but perhaps they also do the opposite too. They invest a lot of disagreement too.

This would result emotional in fluctuations both ways. Going from deep feelings of greatness and love. OR perhaps it need only go one way, and then you slowly come back to reality.

So your emotions only fluctuate to the side of agreement, suggesting you invest more agreement in a belief, but when chopping it down? You only add small helpings of doubt, which result in this "chopping" you described. But this doubt is also assisted by reality.

So :

A quick and large burst of agreement in a belief, then doubt assisted by reality slowly tempers the flame of the large investment of agreement.

What is interesting is that you mention the lack of control. So, not all beliefs we make are conscious. Our brain is always making beliefs as we live our everyday lives without any real conscious awareness it is happening.

Also, it is always easier to see the flaws in ourselves, because we know ourselves best. We can see everything that is going on with us. Where as other people, it takes time to see the flaws for the illusion to dispel.

I also see that you have a lot of investment in the idea that you should trust no one. But then that flame is tempered by reality too.

Agreeing with a belief, and disagreeing with it are the same thing, i always thought. Why? Because if you're disagreeing with a belief, it means you're agreeing with the opposite, so it is actually just a new belief.. But now i'm not sure that is the case. It seems like once a belief is placed, disagreeing with it and unbelieving it is not as simple as just investing agreement in the opposite.
 
S

SJS

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Joined
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Messages
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Location
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I agree with you to some extent. I have borderline personality disorder and how I have managed to overcome some of the obstacles is by saying to myself that no one persons beliefs are right or wrong they are just their own perceptions based on what they know. And those beliefs change as their information is added too. Its very hard to overcome bpd in that you have to constantly monitor what you are saying and doing. So you have to have various amounts of therapy/interactions with others that don't have it or at least are aware they do so you can relearn social educate. Most if not all bpd sufferers were triggered by abuse of some kind as children. Mine was no different. And this abuse as a child during important milestones can set you back massively. You learn as a child from the adults around you. And if those adults are teaching you inappropriate age related issues then if you dont have natural instincts of survival then your outcome can be very badly effected.

Just my view and I do go on tangents as my concentration is hard today.
Yes, the reason i would say it is exceptionally difficult to counteract it is because many beliefs are made without you even having to invest conscious effort. The brain is just a belief making machine that operates with or without your input.

There are many times i'll introspect and look into my own mind and find things that i believe that are just ridiculous, even to the very core of who i am. Things you pick up as a child that dictate your life from your subconscious; and you have to go back there and dig it all up to see what is going on.
 
stevie_sloth

stevie_sloth

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I absolutely adore and whole heartedly love my favourite person, but I am also extremely paranoid that she likes other people more than me, is cheating, is going to abandon me etc.
Yep, yep and SO YEP.
 
PetPetsPelts

PetPetsPelts

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I appreciate your attempt to think about why we suffer from BPD and your theory is very interesting. However one of the symptoms of BPD is dissociation/paranoia. Paranoia means that I do go into everything with suspicion. While I am very black and white about everything I am also extremely paranoid. I absolutely adore and whole heartedly love my favourite person, but I am also extremely paranoid that she likes other people more than me, is cheating, is going to abandon me etc. However thank you again for thinking so much about this and I’d be interested to hear any other theories you have x
I agree with this. There are a lot of trust issues with me and an FP. Suspicions, jumping to conclusions, and requiring constant reassurance is also part of my "slowly chopping away at their throne". I feel this is also part of my self-hate struggle, it's kind of like imposter syndrome I guess. Waiting for the moment I'll be abandoned because they'll eventually "figure" me out.
 
I

IndigoCorkscrew

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Perhaps add to the list the inbuilt obsession with secrecy and an inability to share feelings, emotions and even basic information with people, in case they invade your headspace and do damage to your inner world.
I have BPD of the 'quiet' variety. I cannot share things with people, even if it results in my quality of life being compromised. I must defend my mind at all costs. I trust no one and expect others to harm, ridicule or confuse me, so I keep as much of the world out as possible and give little of myself to the world.
 
D

Dwight7

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Genetics plays a role. I believe my mom has BPD and never had the courage to change. She and I are so much alike...scares the hell out of me.

I’ve had trauma also. But I think my genetic predisposition is the core of my BPD
 
D

Dagoon

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I agree with this. My mother my sisters we all have it due to her raising of us. My family is pretty messed up.
 
D

dewey

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When believing something it involves investing agreement into an idea. A belief when broken down into it's parts is simply an idea + agreement. An idea you've agreed is true. However, what i have discovered is there are degrees to which people invest agreement into ideas.

Some people will invest a LOT of agreement, and this makes a belief feel very solid and secure. Some people however, take everything with a pinch of salt. They don't go all in on a belief, and reserve some doubt.
Firstly I would say, it is quite nice of you to take an interest in BPD not having it, most people wouldn't care.

However I have trouble with "investing too much agreement into an idea". You could say that people with BPD can be very invested in ideas, but that doesn't go very far into explaining 'the root cause' of BPD. That is more just an observation on the symptoms/ manifestation of BPD.

The root causes are complex, including:
  • being born much more sensitive and prone to BPD
  • having an invalidating environment
  • relation to primary care-givers/ experiences in childhood
a combination of these factors, result in a different brain function. Now we are getting closer to 'root cause'.
People with BPD quite literally have different brains that are structured differently. See the brain scans:
Its All In Your Head: Borderline Personality Disorder and the Brain

To cut a long story short, the way people with BPD react to things, results from heightened responses in the amygdala, which in turn lead to distress/ over-emotional responses. Treatment for BPD Is mainly about getting people away from "emotion brain" i.e. limbic system/ amygdala response, and getting them into using their pre-frontal cortex which is used for processing things more rationally/ seeing things from multiple perspectives.

You are certainly right with the inability to
" take everything with a pinch of salt. They don't go all in on a belief, and reserve some doubt",
though once again this is a symptom more than root cause.
The most effective treatments for BPD encourages this ability to not "go all in one belief", to see something from more perspective than one.
Hence the word "dialectical" in "dialectical behavioural therapy": dialectical in this context meaning "concerned with or acting through opposing forces." i.e. being able to see the two opposing sides to something rather than holding on to one firmly.

You could describe "dialectical behavioural therapy" as the therapeutic form of "taking everything with a pinch of salt". I like to remember that the "dia" means two. See one thing in two ways.

As you rightly say, the typical BPD responses are more often automatic, and not conscious. This is because the brain becomes comfortable taking certain routes. i.e. neural pathways. It is quite hard to re-wire those pathways though it is possible.
 
B

Butterfly3

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Messages
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Firstly I would say, it is quite nice of you to take an interest in BPD not having it, most people wouldn't care.

However I have trouble with "investing too much agreement into an idea". You could say that people with BPD can be very invested in ideas, but that doesn't go very far into explaining 'the root cause' of BPD. That is more just an observation on the symptoms/ manifestation of BPD.

The root causes are complex, including:
  • being born much more sensitive and prone to BPD
  • having an invalidating environment
  • relation to primary care-givers/ experiences in childhood
a combination of these factors, result in a different brain function. Now we are getting closer to 'root cause'.
People with BPD quite literally have different brains that are structured differently. See the brain scans:
Its All In Your Head: Borderline Personality Disorder and the Brain

To cut a long story short, the way people with BPD react to things, results from heightened responses in the amygdala, which in turn lead to distress/ over-emotional responses. Treatment for BPD Is mainly about getting people away from "emotion brain" i.e. limbic system/ amygdala response, and getting them into using their pre-frontal cortex which is used for processing things more rationally/ seeing things from multiple perspectives.

You are certainly right with the inability to
" take everything with a pinch of salt. They don't go all in on a belief, and reserve some doubt",
though once again this is a symptom more than root cause.
The most effective treatments for BPD encourages this ability to not "go all in one belief", to see something from more perspective than one.
Hence the word "dialectical" in "dialectical behavioural therapy": dialectical in this context meaning "concerned with or acting through opposing forces." i.e. being able to see the two opposing sides to something rather than holding on to one firmly.

You could describe "dialectical behavioural therapy" as the therapeutic form of "taking everything with a pinch of salt". I like to remember that the "dia" means two. See one thing in two ways.

As you rightly say, the typical BPD responses are more often automatic, and not conscious. This is because the brain becomes comfortable taking certain routes. i.e. neural pathways. It is quite hard to re-wire those pathways though it is possible.
I love and agree with every word of this! Very informative and well put, take care x
 
M

Mistral

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Apr 28, 2011
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747
So say you put all your trust in someone very easily, this belief feels extremely secure, you're feeling very happy.. Suddenly you find out this person has betrayed you in some huge way. What happens? What once felt so secure now emotionally swings completely to the opposite side. Like having the rug pulled out from under you.
Yes fear of abandonment is a big issue for many people with BPD.
 

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