• Welcome! It’s great to see you. Our forum members are people, maybe like yourself, who experience mental health difficulties or who have had them at some point in their life.

    If you'd like to talk with people who know what it's like

20+ years after a traumatic event

K

Keesha

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Hey again Miss M; :)

Ah new parenthood; my trigger also. It's amazing how babies coming into your life can shake up the most stoic of avoidance resolves. It's no wonder you're reaching out. It seems by your responses [to us] that it's finally time to be heard, acknowledged and validated yeah?

Unlike me back in the day, you have self awareness and people to turn to, so facing your past can be shared. Mine was in ignorance/silence until I found a great psychologist and began reading educational material on my diagnosis.

The feeling of caffeine overdose (lol; a great way of describing it) is very normal. In abusive families, adrenaline and cortisol rises due to threats to our safety. (Real or perceived) We don't cause this, it's just how the brain works. (Fight, flight and flee response)

These hormones are supposed to protect/save us when our lives are at risk by heightening our senses. As children don't have experience or knowledge to rely on, they fear everything and so begins the hyper vigilance roller coaster you describe.

Yes, your broken brain. I smiled when I read that as it's the same as what I tell people. It's a really common expression on these pages. @Keesha (hey girrrl) suggested a book; the title says 'Complex PTSD' which is completely different to PTSD on its own. Finding info relating to C-PTSD will serve you well in understanding what's happened/happening to your brain and personality.

She also mentions Dr Wayne Dyer; an amazing man/writer. I met him in Sydney about 25 yrs ago during a seminar. His books are positive, affirming and full of tips to cope while you process past trauma.

I'm so glad you decided to keep posting. :) There's been some wonderful responses to you so I hope you feel more at-home with being here. We're here for you...

Take care;
Liz x
You described this so well Liz. It’s like we are wired up completely different. It’s like we have emotions that are exaggerated. Startle reflexes are off the charts. Counselling does seem to help some but it’s also stressful.

I’m so impressed that you actually met Dr. Wayne Dyer. He somehow manages to explain human psychology in a welcoming way that is easy to understand. I think I read everything he wrote or listened to it through a tape or phone audio. Every time I’ve read or listened to his words, it’s brightened my world up tenfold. Perfect to counteract the intense therapy needed to treat this.

Yes this book is about complex PTSD, not PTSD and they are very different. The symptoms she describes are addressed in the book. Plus I found it helpful getting his point of view because he’ actually has/had complex PTSD so his narration is most believable. It’s definitely written from the heart and is very relatable.

We hope you keep writing MissMusic. ❤
 
Rex Smith

Rex Smith

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To the moderator who edited my post- please just delete it. I guess some things are just best kept to myself. I regret posting about it and I will never make the mistake of discussing it again.
Happens to me a lot. :doh: Sometimes even after proofreading. :confused:
 
K

Keesha

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Trigger warning: extreme violence and abuse

It’s common for violent abusers to stalk their prey. They like to document how well their abuse worked and even encourage others to join in.

After being kidnapped and violently tortured beyond belief, my abusers made sure to share details of my recovery ( of lack of it ) just to add more humiliation. If anyone was expecting normal after that, then they’d be hugely disappointed but unfortunately they do. It’s pathetic that others would take advantage of a damaged mind but people do, especially if they know they can get away with it.

Brutally damaged people don’t instantly recover and often never do even with conventional treatment. The mind does unbelievable things to protect itself that are automatic. Most people don’t understand this because most people haven’t ever experienced this type of abuse.
Thank goodness.
 
OCDguy

OCDguy

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Jun 13, 2016
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I agree the mind can be very delicate and possibly easily manipulated. Unfortunately there are educated people all over the World who actually get a buzz out of playing with peoples' minds? We have to ask ourselves who would encourage and employ these people? There are probably some who even look up to and admire these people??
 
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