Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
    Results 1 to 10 of 11

    Thread: Social Isolation and Mental Illness

    1. #1
      Senior Member cpuusage's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 2012
      Location
      Planet Lunatic Asylum
      Posts
      37,411

      Default Social Isolation and Mental Illness

      Social Isolation and Mental Illness | Brain Blogger

      Think about what it would be like to spend most of your time alone because being around other people is just too difficult. You feel that others are judging you for your mental illness, and so you are scared to face the world. You withdraw to avoid this stigmatization. This social withdrawal is emotionally very costly. But this is a two-way street — the mentally ill withdraw from society–society withdraws from them.

      An Australian survey reported that two-thirds of people affected by a mental illness feel lonely “often” or “all of the time”. The research says in contrast, just 10 per cent of the general population reported feelings of loneliness. (1)

      Social relationships are important for anyone in maintaining health, but for the mentally ill it is especially important. People with mental illness value contact with family. But families may be unwilling to interact with their mentally ill family member. Social isolation is also sometimes due to the unwillingness of others to befriend the mentally ill. The public may avoid them altogether. The stigma associated with mental illness creates huge barriers to socialization.

      People with severe mental illness are probably the most isolated social group of all. They are judged, disrespected and made into pariahs. They fear rejection from others, who may be afraid of the mentally ill, so the mentally ill person may feel overwhelmed by the thought of attempting to form new friendships. Just avoiding any contact is often the choice. Or, they may make a great effort to conceal their condition from others, which results in additional stress from worrying about their true condition being discovered.

      It is sometimes the case that the severely mentally ill person becomes homeless. This in itself is isolating, and they then must suffer the double stigmatization of being homeless as well as mentally ill.

      Another reason the person with mental illness may experience social isolation is the nature of their mental illness. Social phobias like agoraphobia, or severe anxiety or depression often cause the suffering person to be afraid to venture out into society.

      When anyone, mentally ill or not, does not have enough social contact, it affects them mentally and even physically. Loneliness creates stress, taking a toll on health. Other things affected can be the ability to learn and memory function. High blood pressure is also seen. It can be the trigger of depression and alcoholism. (2) Imagine the consequences, then, if you are already depressed or have other mental illnesses? Loneliness can make you worse. Loneliness and loss of self-worth lead many mentally ill to believe that they are useless, and so they live with a sense of hopelessness and low self-esteem.

      Social isolation is both a cause and an effect of mental distress. When the person isolates more, they face more mental distress. With more mental distress, they want to isolate. This vicious cycle relegates many people with severe mental illness to a life of social segregation and isolation.

      Many people with severe psychiatric disabilities say that the stigma associated with their illness is as distressing as the symptoms themselves. This stigmatization not only prevents them from interacting with others, but may prevent them from seeking treatment, which in turn exposes them to a greater risk of suicide.

      Too often the public does not understand the challenges of the mentally ill and doesn’t want to try. It is therefore necessary to confront biased social attitudes in order to reduce the discrimination and stigma of people who are living with mental illness.

      References

      1. Mentally Ill ‘neglected by communities’. (05/08/2002). Yahoo. AU.

      2. Psychology Today. The Dangers of Loneliness. Morano, Hara Estroff. (Aug. 21, 2033).
      http://healingsanctuary.proboards.com/
      https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjpva1C3gypWvOf7iONui1g/videos
      This site does not align itself to any one political, religious, medical or cultural bias.
      Thanks Dita85, clouds gave thanks for this post.
      Likes N/A, Callalily liked this post.

    2. #2
      Founding Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2008
      Location
      london
      Posts
      10,863

      Default

      you've said it all
      Thanks cpuusage gave thanks for this post.

    3. #3
      ACCOUNT CLOSED
      Join Date
      Apr 2013
      Posts
      2,979

      Default

      Good we are as doomed as I had hoped that we were or are? how fabtaboulous to be so outcast is the only way in.#

      katss

    4. #4
      Founding Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2008
      Location
      london
      Posts
      10,863

      Default

      When i was in highcroft they put on my notes that i spend all day lieing on my bed reading sf science fiction was very suspect in those days, then i saw a psychiatrist who was a sf fan in outpatients, he said in Asimiv's The Naked Sun, it's hard to believe how schitzoprenia could exist (they all live alone with robots) he said you don't know what i mean

      I didn't realise it was a problem i was living with my parents at the time, now i realise it is living the independent living thing

    5. #5
      Senior Member cpuusage's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 2012
      Location
      Planet Lunatic Asylum
      Posts
      37,411

      Default

      Quote Originally Posted by ramboghettouk View Post
      I didn't realise it was a problem i was living with my parents at the time, now i realise it is living the independent living thing
      Until people are in that situation then I'm not sure that they can really understand? I've been 15 years single, & 12 years living alone. It's hard & very lonely at times. I do have some friends, but I need to try & increase my social circle again; people don't visit very often.
      http://healingsanctuary.proboards.com/
      https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjpva1C3gypWvOf7iONui1g/videos
      This site does not align itself to any one political, religious, medical or cultural bias.
      Hug Callalily hugged this poster.

    6. #6
      Senior Member firemonkee57's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 2009
      Posts
      7,806

      Default

      I have really noticed the social isolation since my wife died. Sometimes it's worse than others. I think we all like time to ourselves but when you have little choice in the matter it's quantifiably different .Now i have the recovery/rehab team coming in i'm on my own 96-97% of the time. A slight improvement.
      I find non mentally ill people hard to connect with. Truth is many make me feel anxious and threatened. A legacy of being teased and bullied.
      I go to the men's group as regularly as i can. The social interaction is limited. Last week a new man came . He was very chatty but i didn't like the racist/right wing undertones.

      It's a shame they've(Rethink) closed the local drop ins and befriending service for a time limited recovery and self management service. Still it was what the PCT demanded off Rethink for continuing to fund them.
      F*ck the service users -eh?! It's all about what management wants. Who cares if the SMI are more severely isolated as a result.
      My "newspaper" https://paper.li/f-1299495251
      Support mental health research http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
      http://mcpin.org/ https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/
      Hug Callalily hugged this poster.

    7. #7
      Founding Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2008
      Location
      london
      Posts
      10,863

      Default

      It's all about recovery now and if thats no feasible your left, my local mind gave me a glossy brochure about a recovery college in nw london, i thought theres money for that, was thinking of doing a course about mooving on but where do you move on to, a job isn't possible on these drugs even if they were to employ someone in his 50s with my unemployment history, study i've gone as far as i can down that route

      The isolation became a problem after social services left me in the area from hell saying i wasn't a priority, the more i leant on people the more they disapeared

      When i had a support worker he said we can't make friends for you, yes but they could help me avoid losing what friends are left
      Hug Callalily hugged this poster.

    8. #8
      Senior Member shaky's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 2009
      Location
      Warwickshire
      Posts
      7,291
      My Mood
      Busy

      Default

      Quote Originally Posted by firemonkee View Post
      It's a shame they've(Rethink) closed the local drop ins and befriending service for a time limited recovery and self management service. Still it was what the PCT demanded off Rethink for continuing to fund them.
      F*ck the service users -eh?! It's all about what management wants. Who cares if the SMI are more severely isolated as a result.
      They've taken this approach here too.
      It's all about 'outreach'. But how they are reaching out I haven't worked out yet.
      Also, they don't want the same people to keep using the services for ever and ever.
      Yet our doctors tell us that we are incurable, so how can we NOT need the services for ever and ever?
      Sometimes naked, sometimes mad. Now the scholar, now the fool.
      Thus they appear on earth: the free men.
      — from Avadhoota Gita
      Likes Callalily liked this post.

    9. #9
      Senior Member firemonkee57's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 2009
      Posts
      7,806

      Default

      Not only have Rethink closed stuff but the local mh day centre has closed as a result of mh services moving to smaller premises.(financial reasons not better service user provision) There seems to be no recognition that for some recovery is at best partial and at worst illusory. Ongoing support has become a dirty word.
      My "newspaper" https://paper.li/f-1299495251
      Support mental health research http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
      http://mcpin.org/ https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/
      Likes shaky liked this post.

    10. #10
      Founding Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2008
      Location
      london
      Posts
      10,863

      Default

      recovery just means functioning at a level were you don't need expensive services and support and preferably with a big benefit cut as well

      I find my local mind place unusable there are some very aggressive people there and the staff don't tackle them as they see it as part of the illness, been small and nervous doesn't help me
      Hug shaky hugged this poster.

    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •