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    Thread: More Resources for 'Schizophrenia' Recovery.

    1. #11
      Senior Member delatext's Avatar
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      this very moving and gives food for thought, was outraged by Irish hospitals , Amnesty should investigate them !

    2. #12
      coraline1664
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      Just a story of recovery (or at least better times) here. My uncle was diagnosed with schizophrenia in his twenties and is now a visiting academic at a uni with expertise in communication systems. He has a caring partner and seems a lot happier now than he was when I was little- I would say that it has worked out for him.

    3. #13
      Apotheosis
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      Quote Originally Posted by coraline1664 View Post
      Just a story of recovery (or at least better times) here. My uncle was diagnosed with schizophrenia in his twenties and is now a visiting academic at a uni with expertise in communication systems. He has a caring partner and seems a lot happier now than he was when I was little- I would say that it has worked out for him.
      Thank you - Glad that things worked out.

      There are lots of such stories.

    4. #14
      Apotheosis
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      Carl Jung, another drug-free recovery from psychosis



      http://bipolarblast.wordpress.com/20...nt=Yahoo!+Mail

    5. #15
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      Default Non acceptance of diagnosis

      My mum is has been diagnosed with schizophrenia. She is now 55 and still does not accept her diagnosis. She only gets ill when she stops taking her mediaction. She has just been sectioned for the first time in 10 years. The only thing I wish more than anything in the world is that she keeps taking her medication and stays well. Maybe people whi have insight into their diagnosis may benefit from withdrawing from medication but I think your post is misleading and assumes it is a positive thing to be drug free. I would be happy to hear if you have any advice for me, as the hardest thing for me and my family is that my mu does not think she has any mental health issues. And truely I thin the only way to move forward wold be if she accepts she has schizophrenia.

    6. #16
      Apotheosis
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      Frances - Genuine love, kindness, support, acceptance, healing, open dialogue, trust, help & support.

      Accept what? Some nonsense label? Medication can sometimes help - often it doesn't. I agree with your mother - why accept the label? Good luck to her.

      I try to accept that I have a condition - but it isn't what the Doctors say it is! & it's only a tiny part of who I am; it's not what defines me.

      If you don't find any of the information that I have posted here helpful in any way - then ignore it. Simple.

    7. #17
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      Thanks for the swift supply. I am very close with my mum and we are open about everything, accept she will not talk about her mental health as she does not acknowledge that she has any' problems' at all. We are a very close family but feel at a loss of how to help, I belive talking is a powerful healing tool but mum just gets angry and talking is difficult. I am very much into alternative therapies, like my mum, wholesome food and being open. I watched a TV documentary called ' The Doctor who hears voices' about a Dr who has having psychotic episodes and was treated with out medication. It intrigued me and I wish mum could get the support she needs to live life free of medication but as she has no insight into her condition ( as she calls it) then how can she be helped or help herself? I find the most difficult thing, seeing someone I love dearly, ill and not able to talk to her about it directly as when I try she accuses me of not loving her and not understanding. I try very hard to understand and try to expain things to her from my viewpoint, what I have seen and heard whilst growing up, she goes not want to know, or denies things. I believe this is a defence mechanism, as it must be painful and difficult to talk about things. I phone her everyday. I am appauled at the way she has been treated recently in hospital. I always challenge the professionals, but at the end of the day I just want her to lead a fullfilling life and it appears at present that means taking medication. . I guess every person is an individual and different things work. To me schizophrenia is also just a label, I am studying Social work and challenge collegues on their inappropriate sterotypesd views of schizophrenia. Thanks again.

    8. #18
      Apotheosis
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      Thank you for the considered reply Frances.

      It is very difficult. Even when we have very loving & supportive families; these things are hard to discus & work through. I am very close to my family; but there has been battles.

      I've found that living as independently as I can & creating my own social network to have been a great help with things. It's taken me 20 years to get to some level of acceptance around taking a low dose of one medication. & some people find it incredibly difficult to accept taking one. I do think that this is very understandable.

      Medication can help to steady people up & especially lower doses can help people to process what they are expereincing. I'm not opposed to the wise of medication. I don't know what to suggest in your situation.

      I found the following very helpful in this matter; which is from the book 'One in a Hundred' by Aiden Shingler -

      "Neuroleptic drugs [also known as anti-psychotics or major-tranquillisers] are powerful & complex substances. There is a vast amount yet to be understood about the intricate interplay & specific interactions of these drugs on the neurological system. I feel, however, that they can fulfil a valuable role in assisting individuals in their quest for balance, but only if there is a balance of interests between those prescribing & those receiving.

      It is lamentable that the means & methods by which these drugs are systematically imposed by clinicians gives rise to a profound conflict of interests.

      Neuroleptics have the capacity to act upon the human psyche via the realm of alchemy rather than pharmacy.

      My understanding is that schizophrenia is a psychic experience that manifests itself as spiritual conflict. The openness & susceptibility to the effects of paranormal stimuli by those undergoing Psyche-sensitivity can be overwhelming: a dam burst causing a flash flood of psychic activity that fills the planes of the mind.

      If neuroleptics are administered sensitively, then rather than suffocating psychic activity through chemical saturation, these compounds can function as a filter, & posses the potential to limit the frequency & intensity of paranormal occurrences by reducing the psychic aperture, thus enabling psychic activity to be channelled & assimilated. Used minimally, these drugs can improve the life of the individual rather than impoverish it. All too often major tranquillisers are administered as an overdose that nullifies the neurological system rendering the recipient brain-dead.

      The expression less is more springs to mind. Anti-psychic drugs need not be a bitter pill to swallow."

    9. #19
      Robbert
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      Quote Originally Posted by Apotheosis View Post
      Medication can help to steady people up & especially lower doses can help people to process what they are expereincing. I'm not opposed to the wise of medication. I don't know what to suggest in your situation.
      I agree. If you're unable to process information because of neuroleptic 'overdose', then it's very difficult to find the routes of your problems, and even disprove negative thoughts and thinking patterns. You will also be likely to attribute successes in dealing with life to your high dose of medication, and not your coping resources. Medication needs to given carefully and responsibly. Unfortunately, that's usually not the case.

      I hate to think of the potential damage I've caused my brain (whilst it's still developing) over the last 5 years by taking too higher doses of neuroleptic drugs.
      Likes britneylove liked this post.

    10. #20
      maudikie
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      If a patient has repeated breakdowns when stopping their prescribed medication it indicates that they have the condition on a long term basis.
      If this is so then they need to take whichever prescribed medication suits them best. There is a great deal of research at present with brain scans which are able to identify which part of the brain is affected, but will doubtless take some time before they are uiversally available. Perhaps the incidence of schizophrenia appears to be higher in the western world than in the pre-indurial contries is that their social expectations are different.The industrial world has added to greed, and the finances sent to the other countries have been diverted through fraud to those who hanker after power, leaving their own poorer people to wallow in their present difficulties.

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